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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - Pressure mounted on baseball to toughen its steroid-testing regimen, as the White House yesterday urged "strong steps" to combat the drugs and a well-placed senator said it was time for the players union to end its history of "stonewalling." "The president has made it very clear that he believes Major League Baseball needs to act to address the problem," White House press secretary Scott McClellan said at his daily press briefing. "Players who use drugs undermine the efforts of parents and coaches to send the right message to our children.
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By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Now that the NFL and the NFL Players Association have implemented human growth hormone testing as part of a revised performance-enhancing drug policy, Ravens veteran defensive end Chris Canty is hoping that ensures a level playing field. As the Ravens' player union representative, Canty voted in favor of the policy. The changes include a suspension of four games without pay for a first violation, a 10-game suspension without pay for a second violation and a minimum two-year ban for a third violation.
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By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - The last time his old team, the Raiders, reached the Super Bowl, Gene Upshaw was a newly hired labor chief desperately trying to save the football union. The Raiders will once again appear in the championship tomorrow, but Upshaw is in a better position to enjoy the game. The NFL Players Association he has led for two decades has not only averted disaster but grown into the richest union in sports, largely due to a pioneering subsidiary that he founded. Players Inc. goes beyond the commercial endeavors traditionally pursued by players associations.
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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The timing of Bud Selig's pre-retirement news conference at Camden Yards Tuesday was delicious. It was 20 years to the day after major league players walked out and initiated the most disastrous labor showdown in baseball history. The great work stoppage of 1994-95 turned the fans against both the players and owners, and the owner with the biggest target on his back was the acting commissioner, who would eventually become the permanent commissioner and run Major League Baseball for a total of 22 years.
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By Dallas Morning News | May 19, 1994
NEW YORK-- Major-league owners didn't make a contract proposal to the players union in a meeting yesterday that did nothing to lessen the possibility of a late-season strike.This was the third meeting since March between the two sides, who have yet to do more than exchange preliminary financial information.The sides scheduled another meeting Monday in Los Angeles, but it is expected to be next month, at the earliest, before owners make their formal proposal for a new salary compensation system that will include a salary cap to trigger revenue sharing.
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By BOSTON GLOBE | July 3, 1997
An on-again, off-again agreement between the players' union and Major League Baseball designed to resolve Wil Cordero's playing status was agreed upon last night after a day of intensive negotiations.Cordero and his wife, Ana, met in New York with doctors retained by Major League Baseball and the players' union who will oversee his future counseling program.Under terms of the agreement between the union and the owners' Player Relations Committee, Cordero will spend seven days in New York meeting with Dr. Robert Millman and Dr. Joel Solomon.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1997
Major League Baseball's disciplinary summit failed to produce any change in the way the sport handles unruly players, but representatives of the Major League Baseball Players Association and the umpires union agreed to form a study group to examine baseball's disciplinary system.The meeting, held yesterday in West Palm Beach, Fla., was part of an agreement reached in federal court last October to prevent a postseason boycott by umpires, who were outraged that Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar was allowed to postpone the five-game suspension he received for spitting on umpire John Hirschbeck.
NEWS
January 17, 2005
MAJOR LEAGUE Baseball players will report to spring training camps in Florida and Arizona in just five weeks, and clubhouse managers across the show are apt to be busy finding smaller jerseys for not a few pros. Even with baseball's toothless stab at drug testing last season, some ball players showed up with noticeably deflated physiques, the apparent result of having forsaken the juice of steroids. This season, with baseball now having been shamed into the tougher testing protocol announced last week, look for the games to be played on a much more human scale.
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By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
CINCINNATI -- Major-league owners appeared to set the stage for baseball's angriest confrontation yesterday when they approved by unanimous vote a labor proposal believed to create broad new limits on player salaries.Details of the management proposal were the subject of intense speculation yesterday, mostly because owners leaving a lengthy afternoon meeting refused to discuss them until after a negotiating session Tuesday with player representatives.But a central point of the plan almost certainly is a salary cap that would limit player salaries by tying them to owners' overall revenues.
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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The timing of Bud Selig's pre-retirement news conference at Camden Yards Tuesday was delicious. It was 20 years to the day after major league players walked out and initiated the most disastrous labor showdown in baseball history. The great work stoppage of 1994-95 turned the fans against both the players and owners, and the owner with the biggest target on his back was the acting commissioner, who would eventually become the permanent commissioner and run Major League Baseball for a total of 22 years.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- The Orioles had their annual spring players union meeting before today's workout here at the Ed Smith Stadium Complex. Following the meeting, we had a chance to catch up with new union chief Tony Clark and ask about a multitude of subjects, including the qualifying offer compensation process and performance enhancing drugs. Clark said he has some concerns about the qualifying offer process that has allowed the Orioles to sign two free-agents tied to draft-pick compensation - right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez and designated hitter/outfielder Nelson Cruz - to club-friendly, below-market deals.
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By Brian Griffiths | February 3, 2014
Last week, in what has to be one of the more ridiculous stories that I have seen in a while, football players at Northwestern University in Chicago filed the necessary paperwork to begin the process of forming a union. Certainly, you can say that college athletes have a reason to be displeased in many instances. One need only to look at the O'Bannon lawsuit regarding royalties surrounding video game likenesses, or the recent revelation of unsanitary and unsafe conditions at Grambling to know that players have a beef with the system.
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Sports Digest | October 13, 2013
Colleges UMBC, Albany draw in men's soccer, 0-0 The No. 8 UMBC men's soccer team shook off a tough opening half and outplayed visiting Albany over the final 65 minutes, but had to settle for a 0-0 double-overtime draw before an announced homecoming crowd of 1,758 at UMBC Stadium on Saturday. The Retrievers are 10-1-1 overall and 1-0-1 in America East play, while Albany is 2-7-3, 0-1-1. The game was played on the turf at UMBC Stadium because of the heavy rain in the area over the past 72 hours, which drenched the Bermuda grass surface of Retriever Soccer Park.
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Peter Schmuck | August 5, 2013
Maybe someday we will all look back at the decisive action taken by Major League Baseball to discipline Alex Rodriguez and 12 more players in yet another scandal involving performance-enhancing drugs and view it as the seminal moment when professional sports gave us back our innocence. That would be nice, but while you're holding your breath waiting for that happy moment, there is a sleazy chemist somewhere who is moving a couple atoms around on a molecule and creating some new compound that will drag the national pastime through the mud again.
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By Lance Pugmire, Tribune newspapers | September 20, 2011
LAV VEGAS — Billy Hunter, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Assn., emerged last week from a meeting with one-tenth of his 400-plus locked out players. With NBA owners pushing hard on the idea they need to significantly slash payroll and institute a hard salary cap as a response to their claim 23 of 30 teams are losing money, Hunter's players appear headed to a fall — and perhaps winter — without paychecks. Player unity, then, is a crucial element of avoiding a salary free fall.
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By Steven Goff, The Washington Post | August 17, 2011
The women's pro soccer team in South Florida employs several of the U.S. stars from this summer's World Cup, including Abby Wambach and Hope Solo, but the figure who has drawn much of the attention this season has been its owner, Dan Borislow. As magicJack - which is named after Borislow's broadband telephone device - enters the Women's Professional Soccer playoffs this week, a cloud of contentiousness and uncertainty hovers over the club. The team was formerly known as the Washington Freedom before the 49-year-old entrepreneur purchased it from Discovery Channel founder John Hendricks last fall and moved it from Maryland SoccerPlex in Montgomery County to near his Palm Beach home.
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By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1995
NEW YORK -- On a day when the baseball players union took what the clubs view as a fantasy step in their ongoing labor dispute by filing 123 players for salary arbitration, a union official also raised a possibility yesterday that would provide all-too-real consequences for major-league managers, coaches and trainers.Eugene Orza, the Major League Baseball Players Association's associate general counsel, said union officials soon will talk to managers, coaches and trainers about their intentions of working with the replacement teams that clubs are forming.
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By PETER SCHMUCK and PETER SCHMUCK,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1997
The Major League Baseball Umpires Association has announced that its members will be much quicker to eject players, coaches and managers who get out of line during the 1997 season.That announcement, made early this month, was the latest fallout from the Roberto Alomar/John Hirschbeck spitting incident last September in Toronto. The umpires still believe that Alomar was dealt with too leniently and are trying to flex their combined muscle the only way they can - on the field.Off the field, the umpires union does not have nearly the same clout as the Major League Baseball Players Association, a fact that became obvious when American League president Gene Budig suspended Alomar for only five days after the second baseman spit on Hirschbeck at SkyDome during the Orioles' final regular-season series.
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By Dave Zirin | July 9, 2011
In death, legendary Baltimore Colts tight end John Mackey will undoubtedly be remembered for how he played the game. The 6-foot, 2-inch, 230-pounder who played from 1963 to 1972 set the standard for his position, combining speed and power like no tight end who had ever taken the field. As his former coach Don Shula told the Baltimore Sun, "Previous to John, tight ends were big strong guys like [Mike] Ditka and [Ron] Kramer who would block and catch short passes over the middle. Mackey gave us a tight end who weighed 230, ran a 4.6 and could catch the bomb.
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By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
When decertification became a reality for the NFL Players Association, Derrick Mason braced for what comes next: lockout, court battle and lots of disgruntled fans. Speaking from his home in Nashville, Tenn., Friday night, the Ravens' veteran wide receiver and player rep talked about the greed that pushed the NFL to the verge of its first work stoppage since 1987. "That's just killing the golden goose," Mason said of the owners' demand for a giveback in total league revenues. "It might not be all the owners that think that way, so I'm not going to classify all owners that way. "[But]
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