Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPlayer Salaries
IN THE NEWS

Player Salaries

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
The owners want sweeping changes. The players want nothing to change.The owners say they want to save baseball from financial ruin and preserve the delicate competitive balance that allows Milwaukee to beat New York and Pittsburgh to clobber Los Angeles.The players say baseball has never been more balanced, and the owners know it.The owners say they don't want a fight, but will defend their interests if they have to.The players say much the same.Welcome to baseball's labor squabble for 1994.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Robbie Levin | August 8, 2011
As the Orioles continue to get tossed around by their American League East rivals, it's easy to cite disparities in player salaries as the main culprit. After all, the Red Sox and Yankees spend at least $80 million more than the Orioles annually. However, during a recent series against the Yankees, Buck Showalter looked past the large salary gaps and found another startling difference between the division's haves and have-nots. "I know [payrolls are] what everyone looks at when you're talking about this division," Showalter told Bill Madden of The New York Daily News . "But the real disparity, the disparity that's hurting baseball, is the disparity that no one sees -- the amount of money being spent on scouting and player development.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
CINCINNATI -- Major-league owners appeared to set the stage for baseball's angriest confrontation yesterday when they approved by unanimous vote a labor proposal believed to create broad new limits on player salaries.Details of the management proposal were the subject of intense speculation yesterday, mostly because owners leaving a lengthy afternoon meeting refused to discuss them until after a negotiating session Tuesday with player representatives.But a central point of the plan almost certainly is a salary cap that would limit player salaries by tying them to owners' overall revenues.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
When the Ravens were in Tampa, Fla., for the Super Bowl in January 2001, owner Art Modell surprised the players with daily gifts. They would return from practices to find video recorders, CD players and bags of workout clothes in their hotel rooms - largesse intended as Modell's thank-you to those who had made his dream come true. Pat Moriarty, the Ravens' director of football administration, smiled when he heard about the gifts. But he also cringed. "The league is always looking for situations where teams are compensating players without calling it compensation," said Moriarty, a former banker and college and pro football player who manages the salary cap for the Ravens.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1998
In a major blow to the NBA players union, an arbitrator ruled yesterday that the owners will not be obligated to pay salaries during the lockout to the 226 players with guaranteed salaries.The ruling by John Feerick is a major victory for the owners, who appear now to have the upper hand in the lockout since they won't be obligated to pay the nearly $800 million in guaranteed contracts during the course of the season.With the cancellation last week of the first two weeks of the season -- and more games expected to be canceled next week during the league's board of governors meetings -- lost wages by players are expected to total $100 million.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
The price of playing championship-caliber baseball just went up again, but Orioles owner Peter Angelos said yesterday that he remains committed to rebuilding his club on a budget that makes sense for local fans. Obviously, that won't be easy in the wake of a string of megabucks signings that has sent baseball's salary spiral into the stratosphere. Superstar shortstop Alex Rodriguez signed a 10-year contract with the Texas Rangers worth $252 million on Monday, more than doubling the record $123.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,World Features Syndicate, Inc.Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
Rarely has an American institution tinkered with a successful product the way the NFL has this year.As it celebrates its 75th anniversary season, the league seemingly has changed everything but its name. And with the season ready to open Sunday, it hopes that fans won't soon be clamoring for the old NFL."The NFL's future promises to be as exciting as its past," said commissioner Paul Tagliabue to promote the beginning of the new year.That remains to be seen. The one thing that's certain is that it will be different.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | February 24, 1991
The Baltimore Orioles appear to be holding fast to their grand plan to mold an American League pennant contender with players who play hard and play relatively cheaply.But the price has gone up.The Orioles payroll, which was a major-league-low $7.9 million last year, will increase to about $14.6 million in 1991, according to information supplied by management and player sources.Orioles president Larry Lucchino declined to comment on his team's payroll, saying the information was confidential.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
When the Ravens were in Tampa, Fla., for the Super Bowl in January 2001, owner Art Modell surprised the players with daily gifts. They would return from practices to find video recorders, CD players and bags of workout clothes in their hotel rooms - largesse intended as Modell's thank-you to those who had made his dream come true. Pat Moriarty, the Ravens' director of football administration, smiled when he heard about the gifts. But he also cringed. "The league is always looking for situations where teams are compensating players without calling it compensation," said Moriarty, a former banker and college and pro football player who manages the salary cap for the Ravens.
SPORTS
By Robbie Levin | August 8, 2011
As the Orioles continue to get tossed around by their American League East rivals, it's easy to cite disparities in player salaries as the main culprit. After all, the Red Sox and Yankees spend at least $80 million more than the Orioles annually. However, during a recent series against the Yankees, Buck Showalter looked past the large salary gaps and found another startling difference between the division's haves and have-nots. "I know [payrolls are] what everyone looks at when you're talking about this division," Showalter told Bill Madden of The New York Daily News . "But the real disparity, the disparity that's hurting baseball, is the disparity that no one sees -- the amount of money being spent on scouting and player development.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
The price of playing championship-caliber baseball just went up again, but Orioles owner Peter Angelos said yesterday that he remains committed to rebuilding his club on a budget that makes sense for local fans. Obviously, that won't be easy in the wake of a string of megabucks signings that has sent baseball's salary spiral into the stratosphere. Superstar shortstop Alex Rodriguez signed a 10-year contract with the Texas Rangers worth $252 million on Monday, more than doubling the record $123.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1998
In a major blow to the NBA players union, an arbitrator ruled yesterday that the owners will not be obligated to pay salaries during the lockout to the 226 players with guaranteed salaries.The ruling by John Feerick is a major victory for the owners, who appear now to have the upper hand in the lockout since they won't be obligated to pay the nearly $800 million in guaranteed contracts during the course of the season.With the cancellation last week of the first two weeks of the season -- and more games expected to be canceled next week during the league's board of governors meetings -- lost wages by players are expected to total $100 million.
NEWS
October 11, 1998
THOUGH IT is difficult to choose sides in the dispute between National Basketball Association owners and players, a referee would have to hit owners with a technical foul for whining about outrageous salaries of their own making.Team owners drove a gigantic loophole through a strict salary cap in 1983 to allow the Boston Celtics to re-sign superstar Larry Bird for an amount that exceeded that limit. It was this salary cap that was supposed to rein in owners' competitive impulses when bidding on top players.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Mike Preston and Jay Apperson contributed to this article | August 19, 1998
In a sign of the good times for professional athletes in America, the skyboxes at Ravens stadium will be populated not just by corporate bigwigs and government VIPs but by friends and families of players like Eric Green, Cal Ripken and a handful of others looking for recreation or a haven.Six Ravens players are considering or have leased suites at the stadium, either by themselves or in combination with others: Green, Ray Lewis, Rod Woodson, Tony Siragusa, Stevon Moore and Michael Jackson.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
After two years in Baltimore, the Ravens are finally in financial shape to shop for quality instead of quantity during the free-agency period that began at midnight, but the team did not accomplish one of its biggest off-season goals when negotiations on a multi-year contract broke off with center/guard Wally Williams late last night.The Ravens were forced to label Williams, their most versatile and athletic offensive lineman, with the franchise-player tag, which requires the team to pay him $3.052 million, the average salary of the top five offensive linemen in the league, for the 1998 season.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
HAMILTON, Ontario -- Looking to end the owners' lockout, NHL players last night offered to accept limits on rookie salaries, calling the move a "significant concession."The offer, coupled with a request that owners drop their demand for all-encompassing salary controls, came after a seven-hour negotiating session in Buffalo, N.Y.Bob Goodenow, the NHL Players Association's executive director, declined to elaborate."Conversation, hopefully, leads to progress," he said. "It's important to talk and extend the process.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
HAMILTON, Ontario -- Looking to end the owners' lockout, NHL players last night offered to accept limits on rookie salaries, calling the move a "significant concession."The offer, coupled with a request that owners drop their demand for all-encompassing salary controls, came after a seven-hour negotiating session in Buffalo, N.Y.Bob Goodenow, the NHL Players Association's executive director, declined to elaborate."Conversation, hopefully, leads to progress," he said. "It's important to talk and extend the process.
NEWS
October 11, 1998
THOUGH IT is difficult to choose sides in the dispute between National Basketball Association owners and players, a referee would have to hit owners with a technical foul for whining about outrageous salaries of their own making.Team owners drove a gigantic loophole through a strict salary cap in 1983 to allow the Boston Celtics to re-sign superstar Larry Bird for an amount that exceeded that limit. It was this salary cap that was supposed to rein in owners' competitive impulses when bidding on top players.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,World Features Syndicate, Inc.Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
Rarely has an American institution tinkered with a successful product the way the NFL has this year.As it celebrates its 75th anniversary season, the league seemingly has changed everything but its name. And with the season ready to open Sunday, it hopes that fans won't soon be clamoring for the old NFL."The NFL's future promises to be as exciting as its past," said commissioner Paul Tagliabue to promote the beginning of the new year.That remains to be seen. The one thing that's certain is that it will be different.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
The owners want sweeping changes. The players want nothing to change.The owners say they want to save baseball from financial ruin and preserve the delicate competitive balance that allows Milwaukee to beat New York and Pittsburgh to clobber Los Angeles.The players say baseball has never been more balanced, and the owners know it.The owners say they don't want a fight, but will defend their interests if they have to.The players say much the same.Welcome to baseball's labor squabble for 1994.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.