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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 18, 1990
Washington "The Playboy of the Western World" -- John Millington Synge's 1907 drama about a young man who unexpectedly finds himself treated as a hero after he reveals he has murdered his father -- might seem a quaint and foolish fable nowadays. But consider the celebrity status often awarded to criminals by our supposedly sophisticated, upstanding society.A fascination with the doers of bloody deeds appears to span cultures, times and better judgment. (If you doubt it, take a look at the article in the current Vanity Fair on the two Menendez brothers, accused of killing their parents in Beverly Hills.
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By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
When the Playboy Club in Baltimore opened in 1964, it quickly carved a niche for itself in the city. Like its counterparts across the nation, the local franchise prided itself on being upscale and professional, former Playboy Bunnies who worked there said. More than 100 former Bunnies, who worked in clubs internationally from the '60s to the '80s, converged on Baltimore to share stories of the bygone businesses this weekend at their semiannual reunion. Several who worked in Baltimore's club said its appeal was much the same as the magazine's - they were mysterious and provocative.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | March 9, 1996
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Playboy Entertainment Group Inc. won a temporary restraining order yesterday that halts the portion of the new federal telecommunications law that forces cable companies to further scramble or block "indecent programming."U.S. District Judge Joseph Farnan, in issuing the order, said Playboy has demonstrated that it is likely to succeed in its argument that the new cable rule violates the First and Fifth Amendments, and would suffer irreparable harm if the new scrambling rule were implemented.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Baltimore, don't be surprised if you see bunny ears around town this weekend. About 100 former Playboy "Bunnies" will converge on Baltimore for a reunion. The women, who generally meet up every other year, worked as waitresses and hostesses at what was once a national chain of Playboy Clubs, donning silk leotards, bunny ears, tails and three-inch heels to serve customers. Some of the Bunnies also became Playboy magazine centerfolds. "It was the hardest job I ever had," said Marsha Flynn, a nurse practitioner from St. Louis who organized the reunion.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 19, 1990
''Playboy of the Western World'' isn't terribly exciting theater. Time has taken some of its thunder away. It is, however, an interesting play, one that has not lost its relevance. Its theme, that man, given the right conditions, is the animal he always was, is as pertinent today as it was in 1907 when the play, written by J.M. Synge, was produced in Ireland.At the time, the Irish threw things at the actors. They didn't like the fact that the Irish were being portrayed as drunken, savage peasants every bit as cruel as those in ''Zorba the Greek.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 16, 2008
I might have to consider staying longer on the continent, especially after the discovery that they serve beer at McDonald's restaurants in some foreign countries. In particular, this revelation has given me a new appreciation for the French culture. If that isn't enough, I boarded an AirBerlin flight on Thursday and the flight attendants were handing out free copies of Playboy, which caused me to spontaneously blurt out, "What a country!" Unfortunately, it was the German language version of Playboy, so it was useless to me. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 18, 2000
Let's get right to the question everyone is asking: Is Hugh Hefner (the playboy) coming to Baltimore to see Hugh Hefner (the horse) run in the Preakness on Saturday at Pimlico? "Not one chance in 10 million," Edward Nahem, owner of the equine 'Hef,' said yesterday. But didn't the real 'Hef' travel to South Florida with an entourage of Playboy bunnies to watch his namesake run in the Breeders' Cup Juvenile in November at Gulfstream? "He did," Nahem said. "We flew [from California] on the plane together, as a matter of fact.
SPORTS
By Maryjean Wall and Maryjean Wall,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 30, 1991
In her life she'd been kidnapped, shot at and almost stabbed, posed for Playboy and ridden racehorses.But the demon that destroyed Mary Bacon's self confidence was the cancer that finally made her too weak to ride. Before she died recently in Texas, apparently of self-inflicted gunshot wounds, she must have wept over facing a life without racehorses -- no life at all to her.This seems unthinkable, to picture Mary Bacon without the zany zest for life that made her one of racing's unforgettable characters.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 1, 1991
Washington -- It's easy to get Joe Gibbs agitated.Just mention to the Washington Redskins coach that his team is being picked -- not only by such sporting publications as Sports Illustrated and Sport but also by Playboy -- to go to the Super Bowl this season.If you mention it after a frustrating, 24-21 overtime loss to the Cleveland Browns in an exhibition game, he's likely to go ballistic.Steve Buckhantz of WTTG-TV in Washington found that out two weeks ago in a post-game interview after that Browns game when he started with the somewhat exaggerated comment that, "Everyone [is]
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 18, 2012
When women complain about men who can't commit, they can thank -- or blame -- two people: Playboy magazine publisher Hugh Hefner and the former editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, Helen Gurley Brown, who died this week at age 90. Ms. Brown was the flip side of Mr. Hefner, offering women permission, even encouragement, to embrace a female version of Mr. Hefner's freewheeling "Playboy philosophy" of unrestrained sexual pleasure. Ms. Brown and Mr. Hefner offered one-way tickets to fantasyland, a journey supposedly without cost to a destination seemingly without consequences.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 18, 2012
When women complain about men who can't commit, they can thank -- or blame -- two people: Playboy magazine publisher Hugh Hefner and the former editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, Helen Gurley Brown, who died this week at age 90. Ms. Brown was the flip side of Mr. Hefner, offering women permission, even encouragement, to embrace a female version of Mr. Hefner's freewheeling "Playboy philosophy" of unrestrained sexual pleasure. Ms. Brown and Mr. Hefner offered one-way tickets to fantasyland, a journey supposedly without cost to a destination seemingly without consequences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,kevin cowherd@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
The phone rings, and when I pick up, a secretary's voice says something you don't hear every day: "May I put Mr. Hefner on?" This would be Hugh Hefner, legendary founder of Playboy magazine, High Priest of Hedonism, reality TV star, and what am I supposed to say? No, I'm too busy? No, all he talks about is that boring sex, sex, sex stuff? So, of course, I say yes, and seconds later, Hef himself - he likes to be called Hef, even by the jackals in the media - is on the horn from his California mansion.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 16, 2008
I might have to consider staying longer on the continent, especially after the discovery that they serve beer at McDonald's restaurants in some foreign countries. In particular, this revelation has given me a new appreciation for the French culture. If that isn't enough, I boarded an AirBerlin flight on Thursday and the flight attendants were handing out free copies of Playboy, which caused me to spontaneously blurt out, "What a country!" Unfortunately, it was the German language version of Playboy, so it was useless to me. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2004
Playboy magazine has had more than its share of landmark moments, both high and low, over the years. Hugh Hefner's house organ has embarrassed presidents, governors, the occasional evangelist, corporate executives, not to mention corporations, police departments and universities whose employees and students have uncovered the naked truth. But Playboy has never put a possible $3.47 billion deal in jeopardy before, which it has with the current issue. The subjects of September's Playboy interview are Sergey Brin, 30, and Larry Page, 31, the founders of Google, the Internet search engine company whose stock went on sale for the first time Friday.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2002
With John Synge's The Playboy of the Western World, Colonial Players ends its subscription season on the highest note. Judging by acting quality, believability of characters, intensity of energy, historical authenticity and sheer artistry, this production rates excellent marks. Also, director Lucinda Merry-Browne must be complimented for her comfortable pacing of the show, for coaching her actors to speak with a fine Irish brogue and for selecting a brilliant cast. She used the entire space for the theater in the round to heighten the drama as she allowed the audience a glimpse of characters through the windows before they entered a scene.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 26, 2001
FOR A breakfast interview with Playboy cover girl Christi Shake, we chose the famous Double T diner on U.S. 40 in White Marsh, because that's how we do things at this newspaper: first class all the way. "I hope she keeps her clothes on," laughed the woman behind the register when our photographer, Jed Kirschbaum, mentioned he'd be shooting a Playboy model. Jed, who has been in this business a long time, did not want to commit one way or the other for someone he hadn't even met. A few minutes after 9, Christi and her mother, Dawn Fistek, breezed in. Christi, of course, is a looker, and several men at nearby tables nearly wrenched their spines twisting around to stare at her. Right now, she is also getting her first taste of fame.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
When the Playboy Club in Baltimore opened in 1964, it quickly carved a niche for itself in the city. Like its counterparts across the nation, the local franchise prided itself on being upscale and professional, former Playboy Bunnies who worked there said. More than 100 former Bunnies, who worked in clubs internationally from the '60s to the '80s, converged on Baltimore to share stories of the bygone businesses this weekend at their semiannual reunion. Several who worked in Baltimore's club said its appeal was much the same as the magazine's - they were mysterious and provocative.
NEWS
By MONA CHAREN | July 30, 1995
Lisa Heughan gazes at the camera sadly, her lovely eyes brimming with melancholy. She has a story of mistreatment and injustice to tell.It seems that Ms. Heughan had posed nude for Playboy magazine. On her way from Canada to attend a Playboy party in Chicago in 1993, she was recognized by U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service agents at the Toronto airport. One INS agent reportedly found the relevant copy of the magazine in her briefcase and began to page through it, making lewd comments.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 18, 2000
Let's get right to the question everyone is asking: Is Hugh Hefner (the playboy) coming to Baltimore to see Hugh Hefner (the horse) run in the Preakness on Saturday at Pimlico? "Not one chance in 10 million," Edward Nahem, owner of the equine 'Hef,' said yesterday. But didn't the real 'Hef' travel to South Florida with an entourage of Playboy bunnies to watch his namesake run in the Breeders' Cup Juvenile in November at Gulfstream? "He did," Nahem said. "We flew [from California] on the plane together, as a matter of fact.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and TaNoah Morgan and Tom Bowman and TaNoah Morgan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Scores of magazines deemed "sexually explicit" after careful review by a Pentagon panel were plucked from military base stores around the world this week to comply with a 1996 decency law.The 153 magazines range from such popular staples of erotica as Penthouse, Playgirl and Hustler to lesser-known periodicals that include Locker Room Tales, Nude Readers' Wives and Naughty Neighbors.After several page-turning sessions starting last month, the Pentagon's eight-member Resale Activities Board of Review determined that 14 magazines -- including the grand old man of men's magazines, Playboy -- could continue to be sold, because they did not meet the definition of sexually explicit material.
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