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NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2006
A new dimension of music can be experienced through New York City-based architect/artist John Diebboll's 35 colored-pencil drawings that enable viewers to see music, on display now through Feb. 4 at St. John's Mitchell Gallery. The drawings were chosen from Diebboll's collection of art-case piano representations - a 19th-century tradition of one-of-a-kind commissioned constructions to be seen as well as heard. These drawings were inspired by such classical musical forms as etudes, bagatelles, nocturnes, fugues and operas, as well as by pianists George Gershwin, Thelonious Monk, Mary Lou Williams and Randy Weston.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
Evelyn B. Butterhoff, whose spirited barroom playing and renditions of Tin Pan Alley classics took her from the old Emerson Hotel to the Glenmore Tavern on Harford Road — and many places in between — died April 11 of dementia at the Hamilton Center, a Northeast Baltimore nursing facility. She was 86. Evelyn Beck was born in Baltimore and raised in the 400 block of Curley St. By age 7, she was studying piano with a neighborhood teacher, and by 1937 was studying with Jack Rohr at Hammann Music Co. at 206 N. Liberty St. in downtown Baltimore.
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FEATURES
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
Daniel Hays is rhapsodizing about one of his life's passions:"It's not only an escape," he says. "It opens up new vistas. It's like, you open up a room, and then there's another door and then another, and it just opens up such " He pauses. What is the right word? A flash of inspiration pulls him to the piano keyboard an arm's length away."Like Chopin writing about the fall of Warsaw," he says above the heroic music rising from his Yamaha grand.In a couple of days he'll be playing at the Metro Food Market in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,glenn.graham@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
Spalding senior Stefanie Paskal has plenty to do in a short period of time as her high school days come to an end. The prom and graduation are givens, and winning an Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference championship would be a nice bonus. Paskal, a four-year starter, has moved to midfield after playing her first three years on attack, helping the No. 7 Cavaliers get off to a 7-0 start. She's made a smooth adjustment, scoring 20 goals and adding nine assists while enjoying the other responsibilities that come with playing in the middle of the field.
NEWS
September 16, 1993
CHILDREN today have to put up with a lot of things kids didn't used to face, but there's at least one compensation: Fewer and fewer parents are forcing their offspring to spend hours at the keyboard practicing the piano.The decline in piano playing is either a merciful relief from one of youth's prinicipal drudgeries or a descent into barbarism. How you see it depends mostly on how you remember the piano lessons you yourself took as a child. But one thing is certain: with fewer kids trying to find Middle C, the piano business has been in the doldrums for years, with little prospect of a recovery.
NEWS
By Nori Keston | April 22, 1993
MY MOTHER was my first and only childhood piano teacher. She was a professional and her teaching was a big part of my growing up.We lived on a street in Albuquerque set aside for faculty members at the University of New Mexico. Every child on the block had a father who taught at the university (mine taught psychology). Every day, by the time I and my brother and sisters had come home from school my mother was usually teaching. We knew that my mother, who was gifted in many ways, was a slave to the large teaching chair by the piano, where she sat day in and day out, and that her life was painful and circumscribed.
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH | June 14, 1992
As spirited as a gigue, as exacting as a metronome, Jane Tan has launched a national career as a music guru: Twenty-five years of teaching piano at Towson State University have bloomed into "The Well Prepared Pianist" series of instruction books for students and music teachers. The first 14 books of the series have won critical acclaim and fans throughout the music world.Born and raised in the Philippines, Ms. Tan came to the Peabody Conservatory in 1964 on a Fulbright scholarship to study with pianist Leon Fleisher.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 16, 1991
It used to be that his playing wasn't the only thing about Santiago Rodriguez that was hot. The Cuban-born, American-trained pianist got bent out of shape whenever he saw less talented players achieve celebrity."
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,glenn.graham@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
Spalding senior Stefanie Paskal has plenty to do in a short period of time as her high school days come to an end. The prom and graduation are givens, and winning an Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference championship would be a nice bonus. Paskal, a four-year starter, has moved to midfield after playing her first three years on attack, helping the No. 7 Cavaliers get off to a 7-0 start. She's made a smooth adjustment, scoring 20 goals and adding nine assists while enjoying the other responsibilities that come with playing in the middle of the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Benny Evangelista and Benny Evangelista,San Francisco Chronicle | June 5, 2000
A new high-tech piano could be the perfect toy for the musically challenged dot-com magnate with extra cash to burn. Lots of extra cash. The glitzy, chip-powered Yamaha Disklavier Pro 2000, on display recently in San Francisco, can literally play itself and run its own video of the pianist. It's so talented it can recreate an evening with the late George Gershwin, with the same flair and style of the master himself. The fully loaded musical instrument has enough power to make the common desktop PC jealous.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2006
A new dimension of music can be experienced through New York City-based architect/artist John Diebboll's 35 colored-pencil drawings that enable viewers to see music, on display now through Feb. 4 at St. John's Mitchell Gallery. The drawings were chosen from Diebboll's collection of art-case piano representations - a 19th-century tradition of one-of-a-kind commissioned constructions to be seen as well as heard. These drawings were inspired by such classical musical forms as etudes, bagatelles, nocturnes, fugues and operas, as well as by pianists George Gershwin, Thelonious Monk, Mary Lou Williams and Randy Weston.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2004
Loyola junior goalkeeper Akira Fitzgerald considered the trade-off more than an even one. He was about 5 years old at the time and willing to do anything to get on a soccer field. "My mom said if I wanted to play soccer, I had to learn to play the piano, too - no matter what. So as long as I've been playing soccer, I've been playing piano," he said. Fitzgerald, now 17, is into playing classical music and a little jazz, as well as keeping the No. 9 Dons (13-5-1) in every game with a complete goalkeeper package that is largely consistent, but also spectacular when called on. Loyola, coming off an impressive 2-0 win over No. 2 Archbishop Curley on Tuesday, opens the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference tournament as the fourth seed, hosting fifth-seeded Gilman this afternoon in the opening round.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2000
Ellen Nash-Martin works with ebony and ivory. Not organic materials, but plastic. She does woodworking, too. She can spray on a mean coat of high-gloss lacquer. As the Baltimore County school system's only piano technician, Nash-Martin is the magic behind the melodies of 553 instruments in use in classrooms and auditoriums. She calls them the "tanks" of musical education. From her little-known workshop in a dim corner of the Inverness Center in Dundalk, Nash-Martin, a former music education major who plays piano and organ, oversees a geriatric troop of pianos, many of which have been in circulation since the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Benny Evangelista and Benny Evangelista,San Francisco Chronicle | June 5, 2000
A new high-tech piano could be the perfect toy for the musically challenged dot-com magnate with extra cash to burn. Lots of extra cash. The glitzy, chip-powered Yamaha Disklavier Pro 2000, on display recently in San Francisco, can literally play itself and run its own video of the pianist. It's so talented it can recreate an evening with the late George Gershwin, with the same flair and style of the master himself. The fully loaded musical instrument has enough power to make the common desktop PC jealous.
FEATURES
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
Daniel Hays is rhapsodizing about one of his life's passions:"It's not only an escape," he says. "It opens up new vistas. It's like, you open up a room, and then there's another door and then another, and it just opens up such " He pauses. What is the right word? A flash of inspiration pulls him to the piano keyboard an arm's length away."Like Chopin writing about the fall of Warsaw," he says above the heroic music rising from his Yamaha grand.In a couple of days he'll be playing at the Metro Food Market in Hunt Valley.
FEATURES
June 5, 1999
They play the piano. Sometimes we listen. Mostly we eat, we shop, we talk. It's not that we don't appreciate the music, it's just that we aren't paying much attention.They play in department stores, in malls, in restaurants. They provide more than background music, but they're not performing in concert halls. They make our everyday lives a little more lyrical, but for most of us they are nameless and faceless.Here are two of their names and faces:The lamps on the dinner tables add an air of romance and gentility.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 17, 1996
Al Saunders got his start at the old Gayety Theatre, on The Block, where the entertainment carried names such as Irma the Body and Ginger Belle, who strutted their stuff while Saunders expressed his own assets sitting in an orchestra pit and improvising slightly on the alto sax."Just play what's on the paper," the older, grizzled musicians would snap at him. "You're playing too many notes. They didn't come to hear you; they just want to look at the girls."The old guys had been drinking shots since early afternoon.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Wayne J. Mules, a popular pianist at Phillips Harborplace restaurant since it opened 17 years ago, died of a heart attack Friday at his East Baltimore home. He was 59.Mr. Mules was known for his barrelhouse and honky-tonk stylings that often got customers singing.At Phillips, he wore a white shirt, red vest and sometimes a red sleeve garter.Mr. Mules often kept a burning cigarette and a vodka and orange juice sitting on the edge of the piano. His signature song was "I'll Be Seeing You.""He was a mainstay there and it wasn't uncommon to find people standing four or five deep around his piano," said Jay Wachter, director of musical entertainment for Phillips and president of Entertainment Consultants, who hired him."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 13, 1998
The Brazilian Guiomar Novaes, who made her final American appearance in 1972 and who died in 1979, was unquestionably one of the great pianists of the century.The year of her birth was a bumper year for pianists - Novaesshares 1896 with Walter Gieseking and Wilhelm Kempff - and she was the best of the three. But while the careers of Gieseking and Kempff continue to be well-documented on disc - they are nearly as famous dead as they were alive - Novaes is almost forgotten.It is sad, as well as infuriating, that in the Philips label's series, "The Great Pianists," Novaes is not among the 70-odd pianists so memorialized.
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