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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 7, 1991
NEW YORK -- The crowd is with her now, instead of against her. When her nerves are raw, when her serve cracks under presure, they scream her name.It wasn't always this way for Martina Navratilova at Louis Armstrong Stadium. But she's 34 years old, now, and Chris Evert is retired and she is the familiar face in a game overrun with teen-agers.So there she was yesterday in the semifinals of the U.S. Open, trying to dodge every peril her psyche and 22-year-old Steffi Graf could throw her way. Every time she hit a winner the crowd screamed, and when it was over, after Navratilova had somehow put together a 7-6 (7-2)
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 23, 1995
I was learning how to play tennis for about the 15th time in my life. After several sweaty minutes of chasing down elusive tennis balls, of trying to keep my racket back, of trying to keep my wrist loose and my eyes on the ball, I took a break. It was hot. It was humid. The air was so heavy it actually hurt to breathe deeply. It was summer in Maryland.Everybody else in my tennis class had brought along plastic bottles, the kind that professional athletes sip from to restore their precious bodily fluids and to renew their inner strength.
SPORTS
By SKIP MYSLENSKI | March 30, 2006
The kid's fun. That's the best way to put it. He is vibrant and passionate, savvy and skilled, well-versed and well-traveled, and all of it makes him fun to watch, fun to interview. Everywhere he has flair - in his hair, in his words, in the way he goes about his business on the court. He may be only 21 and best known as Florida's 6-foot-11 sophomore forward. But numbers and labels can't confine him, can't confine all that is Joakim Noah. "I am large, I contain multitudes," Walt Whitman wrote in Leaves of Grass.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
NEW YORK - She came. She played. And she was conquered. But Martina Naravatilova, 43, still can hold an audience. She packed each stadium she played during her women's doubles and mixed doubles matches at the U.S. Open and said the crowd's appreciation surprised her. "I mean, what I'm getting from the crowd I never got in my life, even the last couple years on the tour," she said, after she and Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario lost their third-round match to...
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 29, 1991
Their weapons of choice are tennis rackets, not guns. They're sportsmen, not soldiers. And they're angry and scared and even a little confused.They want to be at the U.S. Open, but they also want to be in Yugoslavia. They play for money in the United States and Europe and Asia. But back home, others are playing for greater stakes in a percolating civil war.Excuse Goran Ivanisevic and Goran Prpic for bringing politics and passion to the U.S. Open yesterday. They are Croatians who by the quirk of a draw were placed on the same back court in Flushing Meadow while thousands of miles away their homeland in Yugoslavia was under siege.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Petr Korda is a wisp of a man. At 6 feet 3 and 160 pounds, he often looks overmatched on the tennis court.But then Korda unleashes those devastating passing shots, that leave stronger opponents stranded in their footsteps.Or, his humorous side breaks out and he startles them by juggling tennis balls soccer style on his knees and feet -- just to break the tension.A year ago, Petr Korda was ranked No. 69 in the world of tennis. Today, he is No. 5 and the top seed here at the NationsBank Classic.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | September 5, 1992
NEW YORK -- Sixteen wasn't so sweet for Jennifer Capriati, after all.She lost 30 pounds, gained an Olympic gold medal and signed another multimillion dollar endorsement contract.But she didn't win a Grand Slam title.Yesterday, the "Dream Teen" of tennis was taken out in the third round of the U.S. Open by a 27-year-old named Patricia Hy.Final score: 7-5, 6-4."Well, I had a pretty good summer," Capriati said. "I guess, stuff happens."It certainly does at the Open.After a day of rain, they served up so many matches to complete the men's second round yesterday that you could walk around the National Tennis Center and find superstars playing in out-of-the-way places.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
NEW YORK -- She was the "Chubby Czech" when she arrived here from Czechoslovakia, a plump 18-year-old with promise.But the ugly duckling turned into Martina Navratilova, the greatest player the women's tennis tour ever has seen. And tonight, at Madison Square Garden, she will begin play in the Virginia Slims Championships, the last singles tournament of her professional career."Getting old is very annoying," said Navratilova, 38. "But I have been in the twilight of my career longer than most people have careers, so I am ready to retire."
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | August 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Andre Agassi sat in a comfortable chair inside a white tent at the William H.G. Fitzgerald Tennis Center yesterday afternoon with sweat sliding down the side of his face. The white-hot sun combined with the bright lights of a dozen television cameras made the setting less than comfortable for the sport's veteran star, who is retiring after the coming U.S. Open. But Agassi, his clean-shaven head glistening, showed no sign that he even noticed, as he patiently answered questions about his career and his last appearance at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, a tournament he has won five times in 16 previous appearances.
NEWS
By Pam Lobley | September 1, 2003
HERE ARE some things I did not do this summer: Straighten closets, write my play, organize my desk, turn my mattress, clean out the toy box/garage/basement/attic. I did not go through my linens, figure out how to use a bookmark on the Web, plant new perennials or play tennis. I didn't send my drapes to the cleaner, I didn't get my winter coats cleaned and mended, I still haven't gone through last year's handouts from the school. Frankly, I've done darn near nothing. I did not enrich, enhance, advance, promote or otherwise improve my children.
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