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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 7, 1991
NEW YORK -- The crowd is with her now, instead of against her. When her nerves are raw, when her serve cracks under presure, they scream her name.It wasn't always this way for Martina Navratilova at Louis Armstrong Stadium. But she's 34 years old, now, and Chris Evert is retired and she is the familiar face in a game overrun with teen-agers.So there she was yesterday in the semifinals of the U.S. Open, trying to dodge every peril her psyche and 22-year-old Steffi Graf could throw her way. Every time she hit a winner the crowd screamed, and when it was over, after Navratilova had somehow put together a 7-6 (7-2)
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 22, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Wimbledon, it's not.But what the tennis tournament at the Summer Olympics lacks in tradition, clout and drama, it makes up for in . . .That's the problem. No one has figured out how to turn what is essentially another stop on a world-wide serve-and-volley tour into a grand Olympic moment.This week, Barcelona. Next week, Indianapolis.Wimbledon champion Steffi Graf is here. So are American's Jim Courier, No. 1 in the world, and Michael Chang and Pete Sampras. And Arantxa Sanchez Vicario, the local heroine, will aim for a gold medal on red clay at the La Teixonera Municipal Tennis Club.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Petr Korda is a wisp of a man. At 6 feet 3 and 160 pounds, he often looks overmatched on the tennis court.But then Korda unleashes those devastating passing shots, that leave stronger opponents stranded in their footsteps.Or, his humorous side breaks out and he startles them by juggling tennis balls soccer style on his knees and feet -- just to break the tension.A year ago, Petr Korda was ranked No. 69 in the world of tennis. Today, he is No. 5 and the top seed here at the NationsBank Classic.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | September 5, 1992
NEW YORK -- Sixteen wasn't so sweet for Jennifer Capriati, after all.She lost 30 pounds, gained an Olympic gold medal and signed another multimillion dollar endorsement contract.But she didn't win a Grand Slam title.Yesterday, the "Dream Teen" of tennis was taken out in the third round of the U.S. Open by a 27-year-old named Patricia Hy.Final score: 7-5, 6-4."Well, I had a pretty good summer," Capriati said. "I guess, stuff happens."It certainly does at the Open.After a day of rain, they served up so many matches to complete the men's second round yesterday that you could walk around the National Tennis Center and find superstars playing in out-of-the-way places.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
NEW YORK - She came. She played. And she was conquered. But Martina Naravatilova, 43, still can hold an audience. She packed each stadium she played during her women's doubles and mixed doubles matches at the U.S. Open and said the crowd's appreciation surprised her. "I mean, what I'm getting from the crowd I never got in my life, even the last couple years on the tour," she said, after she and Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario lost their third-round match to...
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 29, 1991
Their weapons of choice are tennis rackets, not guns. They're sportsmen, not soldiers. And they're angry and scared and even a little confused.They want to be at the U.S. Open, but they also want to be in Yugoslavia. They play for money in the United States and Europe and Asia. But back home, others are playing for greater stakes in a percolating civil war.Excuse Goran Ivanisevic and Goran Prpic for bringing politics and passion to the U.S. Open yesterday. They are Croatians who by the quirk of a draw were placed on the same back court in Flushing Meadow while thousands of miles away their homeland in Yugoslavia was under siege.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
NEW YORK -- She was the "Chubby Czech" when she arrived here from Czechoslovakia, a plump 18-year-old with promise.But the ugly duckling turned into Martina Navratilova, the greatest player the women's tennis tour ever has seen. And tonight, at Madison Square Garden, she will begin play in the Virginia Slims Championships, the last singles tournament of her professional career."Getting old is very annoying," said Navratilova, 38. "But I have been in the twilight of my career longer than most people have careers, so I am ready to retire."
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart | October 9, 1990
He's the No. 3-ranked tennis player in the world, and he's from Baltimore County.No, Lendl, Becker and Co. have not taken up local residence. This is Kevin Whalen, who lives in Woodlawn, and you might not have heard of him.Whalen, 33, has been a quadriplegic since a 1984 swimming accident. A former collegiate player, he took up wheelchair tennis seriously only three years ago.He has made such progress that not only is he up to No. 3, but he also will be bidding to improve on that status in this week's U.S. Open championships in Irvine, Calif.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | August 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Andre Agassi sat in a comfortable chair inside a white tent at the William H.G. Fitzgerald Tennis Center yesterday afternoon with sweat sliding down the side of his face. The white-hot sun combined with the bright lights of a dozen television cameras made the setting less than comfortable for the sport's veteran star, who is retiring after the coming U.S. Open. But Agassi, his clean-shaven head glistening, showed no sign that he even noticed, as he patiently answered questions about his career and his last appearance at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, a tournament he has won five times in 16 previous appearances.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | July 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Did you ever wonder how John McEnroe can live with himself the way he plays tennis these days?But, of course, you know the answer. It drives him nuts.Other things used to drive him nuts, and they probably still do. But this has got to be fingernails-on-the-blackboard stuff. This has got to be the pits of the world.I saw him the other night at the Sovran tennis tournament. To say McEnroe, at 32, was a shadow of his old self is to slander shadows. In a routine, first-round match, he nearly choked away (his words)
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