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SPORTS
May 10, 2000
TORONTO -- When Mike Hargrove penciled in Cal Ripken as last night's designated hitter, he virtually confirmed that Harold Baines' status is now as a platoon player. Baines, 41, who last season batted .302 with three home runs and 17 RBIs in 53 at-bats against left-handers, is hitless in seven at-bats against them this season and apparently will not receive additional time despite the absence of first baseman Will Clark (hamstring). Baines was not in last night's lineup against Toronto Blue Jays left-hander David Wells, against whom he enjoys a career .333 average in 36 at-bats.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Kenneth Halls Masters, an attorney who represented Catonsville and Arbutus in the Maryland General Assembly, where he had been House majority leader, died of cancer Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. He was 68. Born in Washington and raised at Scientists Cliff in Calvert County, he was a 1961 graduate of Charlotte Hall Military Academy. Interested in politics as a teen, he campaigned for longtime Maryland Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein. He earned a bachelor's degree at what is now Towson University, where he was student body president.
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NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
Thirty-three years after the bravest act of his life, Alfred V. Rascon might finally get the recognition many feel he deserves.Legislation moving through Congress would allow the Vietnam War veteran, a resident of North Laurel in Howard County, to receive a Medal of Honor later this year for running into enemy fire and saving many of his fellow platoon members from certain death.It is a scene that has replayed in his head almost every day for more than half his life: the dead soldiers, the sound of machine guns, the blood, the pain.
EXPLORE
July 22, 2011
Air Force Airman 1st Class Alexander J. Kim graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, in San Antonio. He is the son of Hyo and Seong Kim, of West Friendship. Kim graduated in 2005 from Glenelg High School. Pvt. Xavier A. Johnson graduated from the United States Marine Corp basic training 2nd Battalion platoon 2052, on July 1, from Parris Island, S.C. He is the son of Barbara L. Jackson, of Columbia, and grandson of Edna M. Jackson, of Columbia.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
Through the glass front door, Sandy Seidel could see the uniformed Army officer who had come to deliver the news, and she thought for a fleeting moment that maybe, if she didn't answer, the man would go away. "But I knew what it was," she said, as the memory of that moment brought back tears yesterday. For the mother of a son serving in Iraq, "it's your nightmare." Army 1st Lt. Robert Seidel III, 23, of Gettysburg, Pa., was killed while on patrol Thursday afternoon when his Humvee was struck by an explosive device, she and her husband, Robert Seidel Jr., said yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - Cpl. Patrick Tillman, the former football star turned Army Ranger who died in Afghanistan last month, was probably killed by allied fire while leading his unit in combat, the Army said yesterday. Tillman, who died on April 22, "probably died as a result of friendly fire while his unit was engaged in combat with enemy forces," the Army said in a statement. An investigation made no specific finding of fault in the incident, it said. Lt. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., head of the Army Special Operations Command, read a statement summarizing an investigation into Tillman's death at a brief news conference at the command's headquarters at Fort Bragg, N.C. Kensinger, who did not take questions, said the manner of Tillman's death did not diminish the bravery and sacrifice of someone who responded to enemy fire "without regard to his own safety."
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It took 34 years, but Alfred V. Rascon has finally received his due. Yesterday, the North Laurel resident received the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military award for valor, for his bravery on March 16, 1966 -- the day he jumped into enemy fire not once but several times to rescue fellow platoon members. At least six of Rascon's war comrades attended the afternoon ceremony at the White House. Before they flew in earlier this week, Rascon had not seen them for more than three decades, not since the day he risked his life to save theirs.
SPORTS
By Newsday | January 19, 1994
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Having failed in their quest to obtain a full-time shortstop, the New York Mets now are thinking of platooning at the most critical defensive position.While they continue to talk with the Cleveland Indians about Omar Vizquel and Mark Lewis, they have made an offer to 30-year-old free agent Luis Rivera.Jim Bronner, one of the agents representing Rivera, confirmed the offer yesterday and acknowledged that his client stood a better chance of playing regularly with the Mets than with any of the other clubs who have expressed an interest in Rivera.
EXPLORE
July 22, 2011
Air Force Airman 1st Class Alexander J. Kim graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, in San Antonio. He is the son of Hyo and Seong Kim, of West Friendship. Kim graduated in 2005 from Glenelg High School. Pvt. Xavier A. Johnson graduated from the United States Marine Corp basic training 2nd Battalion platoon 2052, on July 1, from Parris Island, S.C. He is the son of Barbara L. Jackson, of Columbia, and grandson of Edna M. Jackson, of Columbia.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
The Orioles are close to signing free-agent infielder Bill Ripken, two club sources confirmed last night.Orioles manager Davey Johnson couldn't be reached for comment, but according to the club sources, Ripken could be used in a number of roles. If the Orioles sign one of the expensive free-agent second basemen, Roberto Alomar or Craig Biggio, Ripken would be used in a backup role, playing at second and third.If the Orioles don't sign Alomar or Biggio -- and there's a good chance of that, given Alomar's contract demands and Biggio's inclination to remain in the National League -- Ripken could be used in a platoon role, playing against left-handers.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Dan Connolly and Jeff Zrebiec and Dan Connolly and,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com and dan.connolly@baltsun.com | January 19, 2009
When the Orioles were in extensive trade talks with the Chicago Cubs last year about Brian Roberts, they wanted young outfielder Felix Pie and were told that he was unavailable. Yesterday, with the Cubs running out of both patience and opportunity for their one-time top prospect, they sent him to the Orioles for starting pitcher Garrett Olson and Single-A pitcher Henry Williamson. The trade was Orioles president Andy MacPhail's latest attempt to make the team's roster younger and more athletic, and add to the organization's young position-player depth, which has been lacking for years.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | December 9, 2007
On a clear night last spring in Afghanistan's eastern mountains, a U.S. infantry platoon went looking for an al-Qaida operative named Habib Jan, and they found him. Outside an abandoned village clinging to a rocky hillside, the platoon was ambushed in a rain of deadly rifle and machine gun fire. Twenty-seven Americans and five Afghan Army fighters together fought 90 or 100 of Habib Jan's Islamist extremists. For 17 hours, the American platoon was pinned down. Bullets snapped and hissed as the enemy slowly closed in. Ammunition ran low. Water ran out. Sniper rounds plucked at the soldiers' helmets and sleeves and drilled through boots as they shifted and returned fire.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,[Sun Reporter] | October 21, 2007
The War I Always Wanted By Brandon Friedman Zenith Press / 255 pages / $24.95 They have stories to tell, those dusty soldiers who trek through the airport in their desert uniforms and worn boots and thousand-yard stares, on their way home from Iraq or on their way back. Most will never tell their stories: They're too painful and the humor too black, altogether too complicated for someone who wasn't there. An exception is this infantry lieutenant whose memoir of Afghanistan and Iraq is a book you'll want to read parts of aloud to somebody.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
Through the glass front door, Sandy Seidel could see the uniformed Army officer who had come to deliver the news, and she thought for a fleeting moment that maybe, if she didn't answer, the man would go away. "But I knew what it was," she said, as the memory of that moment brought back tears yesterday. For the mother of a son serving in Iraq, "it's your nightmare." Army 1st Lt. Robert Seidel III, 23, of Gettysburg, Pa., was killed while on patrol Thursday afternoon when his Humvee was struck by an explosive device, she and her husband, Robert Seidel Jr., said yesterday.
NEWS
By Mark Mazzetti and Ellen Barry and Mark Mazzetti and Ellen Barry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Army has launched an investigation into whether members of an Army reserve unit in Iraq refused to carry out a convoy supply mission this week, military officials said yesterday. The incident came to light when relatives of the soldiers under investigation declared that the troops disobeyed orders to drive in the convoy because they considered it a "suicide mission." The troops believed that the poor condition of their fuel trucks and the lack of armored vehicles to escort them meant that the convoy would be too dangerous, the family members said.
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
When Pvt. Charles "Harry" Heinlein of Baltimore left a packed Queen Mary ocean liner for the port at Greenock, Scotland, in October 1942, a bagpipe band greeted him and his nearly 7,000 mates from the U.S. Army's 29th Division. He'd never imagined such sad, strange, exotic sounds. Gripping his duffel and heading for the trains south, he had no clue that 19 months later, he would be asked to take part in a seaborne invasion of the Continent, one a commanding officer would describe as "the most important military operation in the history of the world."
NEWS
February 28, 1997
The fifth annual Anne Arundel County Police Foundation Awards Banquet Tuesday honored officers and civilians whose courageous acts or extraordinary performances were above the call of duty.Silver Star Awards, given for acts of courage involving personal risk while protecting or saving the life of another, went to: Cpl. Maxwell Frye and Officers Michael Galligan, Sean Grant, Robert Mack and Clarence Whitlow.Department Commendation Awards, given for saving the life of another or for an arrest culminating in clearing one or more in a series of important cases, went to: Sgt. Raymond Schueler, Cpls.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - Cpl. Patrick Tillman, the former football star turned Army Ranger who died in Afghanistan last month, was probably killed by allied fire while leading his unit in combat, the Army said yesterday. Tillman, who died on April 22, "probably died as a result of friendly fire while his unit was engaged in combat with enemy forces," the Army said in a statement. An investigation made no specific finding of fault in the incident, it said. Lt. Gen. Philip R. Kensinger Jr., head of the Army Special Operations Command, read a statement summarizing an investigation into Tillman's death at a brief news conference at the command's headquarters at Fort Bragg, N.C. Kensinger, who did not take questions, said the manner of Tillman's death did not diminish the bravery and sacrifice of someone who responded to enemy fire "without regard to his own safety."
SPORTS
By Paul Sullivan and Paul Sullivan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 1, 2003
Late Orioles game: Last night's game between the Orioles and Minnesota Twins at the Metrodome, which went into extra innings, ended too late to be included in this edition. A complete report can be found in later editions or on the Internet at http://www.sunspot.net. CHICAGO - Former Orioles slugger Rafael Palmeiro still may be on the Chicago Cubs' radar screen, even though the former Cub doesn't appear interested in returning to Chicago. The non-waiver trading deadline passed yesterday afternoon with the Cubs making no moves, but their surprising pursuit of the Texas first baseman suggests they still are trying to improve the offense.
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