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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
For Lisa Menowitz-Hamburger, it's still the '70s -- in her closet at least. The bell-bottoms, miniskirts and platform shoes are all there like reminders of her younger days. Only this time around, the clothes have a '90s flair.Although Mrs. Hamburger, 28, hesitates to turn up at the office in retro wear, (she works in human resources for CMG Health, a managed mental health care company in Owings Mills), she will show her fashion devotion to the decade on March 5 when she and her husband co-chair "Saturday Night Fever," a '70s-themed benefit for Cystic Fibrosis at HarborView Marina and Yacht Club.
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By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
It was 1966, all peace signs and Beatles, 5-cent postage stamps and What's it all about, Alfie? Stokely Carmichael was elected president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, The Sound of Music won the Oscar for best picture and the first-ever episode of Star Trek aired. It was cool, man. On Baltimore's funky Read Street, a little shop had just opened, first selling handmade jewelry, then slowly adding the latest youthful fashions. The Bead Experience was an off-the-cuff venture by sisters Idy and Anne Bashoff, who -- with a shop full of bell-bottom pants, Nehru jackets and platform shoes -- single-handedly ushered in the local hippie-fashion revolution.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1994
The way Baltimore comic Andre Browne sees it, if his sense of humor doesn't leave 'em laughing, maybe his clothing will.That's why he often performs his stand-up routine in a leather-studded vest, pirate shirt and hoop earrings. "I also wear electric colors," says Mr. Browne, 31, who has been featured in Barry Levinson's "Homicide." "Folks look at me and say, 'What volt batteries do you have on that outfit?' "*Do you really dress funny?The whole idea is to be hip and smooth and funky. I do a lot of participatory stuff, so I like loose, comfortable clothes.
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By Elsa Klensch | November 2, 1995
For years I have based my wardrobe on black. I don't have a lot of money or time to spend on clothes, and black makes me look slim. I was recently promoted, and part of my new job is to give talks about the company and its services.I'm excited about it and willing to splurge on some new clothes. But not black. I want to look striking when I stand at the podium.All colors look good with black, so whatever you buy will work with your wardrobe. But if you want to look striking, choose a bright because brights look stunning with black.
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | September 24, 1992
"Your mother wears combat boots!" was once a slur against that sainted woman's attractiveness and justifiable cause to fight for her stylish honor. Don't fight; just bite the bullet. Combat boots are the last word in fashion. Chanel has done clunky black lace-ups with a gold-plated toe and heel plate to sell for $1,000 plus. Dolce & Gabanna do them up in silver to peep from beneath a frothy evening skirt. And you were worried about platform shoes?Keeping up with the fashion pack isn't easy.
FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 20, 1991
The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society recently proclaimed get this that high heels are a pain. Women have known that for years.This revelation was trumpeted on front pages of newspapers across the country, causing women with first-hand knowledge of pinched nerves, hammer toes, bunions, corns and callouses to shake their heads. What will the researchers find next? That men find neckties an uncomfortable encumbrance?After surveying 356 women, Los Angeles orthopedic surgeon Carol Frey found that 88 percent of them were wearing shoes at least a size too small.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | June 3, 1993
When you sell leopard-print lamp shades, kimonos and platform shoes, it's hard to show up for work in a T-shirt and jeans.No matter. That's hardly Elaine Ferrare's style anyway. As the owner of Killer Trash, one of Fells Point's newest and funkiest thrift shops, she likes to dress on the wild side -- and sell the stuff, too.How would you describe your style?Everyone has always told me I have my own sense of style. I dress for fun. I used to say I'd get dressed, look in the mirror, and if I laughed, then I'd go out. Today I'm more low-key about what I wear.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch | November 2, 1995
For years I have based my wardrobe on black. I don't have a lot of money or time to spend on clothes, and black makes me look slim. I was recently promoted, and part of my new job is to give talks about the company and its services.I'm excited about it and willing to splurge on some new clothes. But not black. I want to look striking when I stand at the podium.All colors look good with black, so whatever you buy will work with your wardrobe. But if you want to look striking, choose a bright because brights look stunning with black.
FEATURES
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,Chicago Tribune | May 6, 1992
NEW YORK -- Maybe the 50th anniversary of the film classic "Casablanca" had something to do with it. Or, maybe, it's because the sober-minded, recession-humbled American '90s have more than a little in common with the up-against-it, war-straitened circumstances of a half-century ago. For fall 1992, New York designers are playing the '40s again and the general reaction is, well, bewitched, bothered and bewildered.For day, it's all about men's wear the way Ingrid Bergman and Katharine Hepburn wore it, only a little more shapely and a lot leaner.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook and Catherine Cook,Sun Fashion Editor | January 16, 1992
I t's 3 a.m. The average Baltimorean is snug in bed, briefcase by the door ready for the next day's work.But downtown, in an old warehouse near Camden Yards, the music is blasting and platform shoes are stomping to the pounding beat in a frenzy of fashion fantasy.Wild young women in metallic hot pants and motorcycle boots dance alongside sweet young things in Woodstock prairie dresses. Their partners range from clean-cut young men in denim shirts and floral ties to long-haired fellows in flannel tartans and jeans.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | October 31, 1994
As further proof that people can be nostalgic for virtually anything (there are, after all, Guy Lombardo societies), I give you the latest in niche radio -- all '70s music, all the time.I'm not making this up. The concept is sweeping America, which, as the car commercial reminds us, invented rock and roll.For those of you who actually lived through the '70s -- many brave, young men, you'll recall, were lost while trying to walk on platform shoes -- this has to be a stunning turn of events.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1994
The way Baltimore comic Andre Browne sees it, if his sense of humor doesn't leave 'em laughing, maybe his clothing will.That's why he often performs his stand-up routine in a leather-studded vest, pirate shirt and hoop earrings. "I also wear electric colors," says Mr. Browne, 31, who has been featured in Barry Levinson's "Homicide." "Folks look at me and say, 'What volt batteries do you have on that outfit?' "*Do you really dress funny?The whole idea is to be hip and smooth and funky. I do a lot of participatory stuff, so I like loose, comfortable clothes.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
For Lisa Menowitz-Hamburger, it's still the '70s -- in her closet at least. The bell-bottoms, miniskirts and platform shoes are all there like reminders of her younger days. Only this time around, the clothes have a '90s flair.Although Mrs. Hamburger, 28, hesitates to turn up at the office in retro wear, (she works in human resources for CMG Health, a managed mental health care company in Owings Mills), she will show her fashion devotion to the decade on March 5 when she and her husband co-chair "Saturday Night Fever," a '70s-themed benefit for Cystic Fibrosis at HarborView Marina and Yacht Club.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | June 3, 1993
When you sell leopard-print lamp shades, kimonos and platform shoes, it's hard to show up for work in a T-shirt and jeans.No matter. That's hardly Elaine Ferrare's style anyway. As the owner of Killer Trash, one of Fells Point's newest and funkiest thrift shops, she likes to dress on the wild side -- and sell the stuff, too.How would you describe your style?Everyone has always told me I have my own sense of style. I dress for fun. I used to say I'd get dressed, look in the mirror, and if I laughed, then I'd go out. Today I'm more low-key about what I wear.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | September 24, 1992
"Your mother wears combat boots!" was once a slur against that sainted woman's attractiveness and justifiable cause to fight for her stylish honor. Don't fight; just bite the bullet. Combat boots are the last word in fashion. Chanel has done clunky black lace-ups with a gold-plated toe and heel plate to sell for $1,000 plus. Dolce & Gabanna do them up in silver to peep from beneath a frothy evening skirt. And you were worried about platform shoes?Keeping up with the fashion pack isn't easy.
FEATURES
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,Chicago Tribune | May 6, 1992
NEW YORK -- Maybe the 50th anniversary of the film classic "Casablanca" had something to do with it. Or, maybe, it's because the sober-minded, recession-humbled American '90s have more than a little in common with the up-against-it, war-straitened circumstances of a half-century ago. For fall 1992, New York designers are playing the '40s again and the general reaction is, well, bewitched, bothered and bewildered.For day, it's all about men's wear the way Ingrid Bergman and Katharine Hepburn wore it, only a little more shapely and a lot leaner.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | October 31, 1994
As further proof that people can be nostalgic for virtually anything (there are, after all, Guy Lombardo societies), I give you the latest in niche radio -- all '70s music, all the time.I'm not making this up. The concept is sweeping America, which, as the car commercial reminds us, invented rock and roll.For those of you who actually lived through the '70s -- many brave, young men, you'll recall, were lost while trying to walk on platform shoes -- this has to be a stunning turn of events.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
It was 1966, all peace signs and Beatles, 5-cent postage stamps and What's it all about, Alfie? Stokely Carmichael was elected president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, The Sound of Music won the Oscar for best picture and the first-ever episode of Star Trek aired. It was cool, man. On Baltimore's funky Read Street, a little shop had just opened, first selling handmade jewelry, then slowly adding the latest youthful fashions. The Bead Experience was an off-the-cuff venture by sisters Idy and Anne Bashoff, who -- with a shop full of bell-bottom pants, Nehru jackets and platform shoes -- single-handedly ushered in the local hippie-fashion revolution.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook and Catherine Cook,Sun Fashion Editor | January 16, 1992
I t's 3 a.m. The average Baltimorean is snug in bed, briefcase by the door ready for the next day's work.But downtown, in an old warehouse near Camden Yards, the music is blasting and platform shoes are stomping to the pounding beat in a frenzy of fashion fantasy.Wild young women in metallic hot pants and motorcycle boots dance alongside sweet young things in Woodstock prairie dresses. Their partners range from clean-cut young men in denim shirts and floral ties to long-haired fellows in flannel tartans and jeans.
FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 20, 1991
The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society recently proclaimed get this that high heels are a pain. Women have known that for years.This revelation was trumpeted on front pages of newspapers across the country, causing women with first-hand knowledge of pinched nerves, hammer toes, bunions, corns and callouses to shake their heads. What will the researchers find next? That men find neckties an uncomfortable encumbrance?After surveying 356 women, Los Angeles orthopedic surgeon Carol Frey found that 88 percent of them were wearing shoes at least a size too small.
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