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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 25, 2013
The flu continues to infect people in Maryland as state health officials described the intensity of the virus as high and widespread for the week ending January 19. But a report by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the flu activity appears to be hitting a plateau and beginning to trend downward. A total of 198 people were hospitalized for the week with flu-like symptoms and problems. About 59 percent, or 116 patients were older than age 65. No deaths were reported.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | January 21, 2014
Forward Chase Plummer led the UMBC men's basketball team with 21 points and seven rebounds Monday night and became the 12th player in school history to reach the 1,200-point plateau, but the Retrievers lost to visiting Stony Brook, 81-62. Plummer was named the Retrievers' Player of the Game, while senior guard Dave Coley earned the honor for the visitors. Coley led all scorers with 22 points, hitting 13 of 15 free-throw attempts. UMBC (5-14, 1-5 America East) went toe-to-toe with the Seawolves (13-6, 5-0)
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 3, 2003
WASHINGTON -- As policy director for the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1995, Wesley K. Clark accompanied President Clinton's national security adviser, Anthony Lake, on a trip to try to sell a peace plan for Bosnia to leaders in Europe. Settling into a small Air Force plane, Clark started to make small talk. "Nice suit," he quipped to Lake. Lake gestured to Clark's attire -- Army greens adorned with a general's three stars, ribbons and a shoulder combat patch. "I'll trade you," he said. Clark realized then that he was wearing "the ultimate power suit," as he would later write, describing his uniform as an ensemble "connoting authority and experience and helping its wearer stand out in a crowd."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 25, 2013
The flu continues to infect people in Maryland as state health officials described the intensity of the virus as high and widespread for the week ending January 19. But a report by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the flu activity appears to be hitting a plateau and beginning to trend downward. A total of 198 people were hospitalized for the week with flu-like symptoms and problems. About 59 percent, or 116 patients were older than age 65. No deaths were reported.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch | November 3, 1991
A Maryland engineer plans to lead an expedition next year deep into the core of a 6,500-foot-high limestone plateau in Mexico, wiggling through crevasses, climbing down thundering waterfalls and scuba diving through uncharted caverns.The payoff? William Stone and the 11 other expert cave climbers and divers on his international team hope to travel more than a mile beneath the surface, deeper into the planet's crust than anyone else has ever gone."This ranks with [Sir Edmund] Hillary's climbing of Mount Everest," said Heather Sloan, a spokesman for the U.S. Deep Diving Team, one of the expedition's sponsors.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2004
Howard County school officials have predicted for some time that pupil enrollment would peak by 2008 and then start falling off, a theory that has driven school and home construction decisions. But no more. A new "plateau theory" has taken hold at school board headquarters, and it's winning confidence among often-skeptical county officials, parents and school board members trying to plan how many additional classrooms will be needed. David C. Drown, manager of school planning, said he believes school enrollments will continue climbing -- but at a slow pace, reaching a plateau of about 50,700 children by 2010.
NEWS
February 24, 2011
June 25, 1984: Ken Singleton became the 150th player in baseball history to reach the 2,000-hit plateau.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2004
JOS, Nigeria - President Olusegun Obasanjo declared a state of emergency in the central state of Plateau yesterday, suspending its elected officials and putting a retired general in charge of a region racked for months by sectarian violence. In an announcement on state radio and television, Obasanjo accused Plateau officials of having "wittingly and unwittingly encouraged acts that have subverted peace and tranquillity." The president suspended the state governor, his deputy and the state assembly.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
LANEVILLE, W.Va. -- Dolly Sods is the land of the one-sided spruce. The wind blows so hard from the northwest that trees grow branches only on the southeast side.As in the arctic tundra, shrubs become low, thick and tough from the harsh weather. You can crawl over the top of some.Few other wildernesses 4,000-feet high have beaver ponds, wild cranberries in bogs and humans examining in solitude the edelweiss-like stonecrop and other rare plants.But in this remote corner, workers find and destroy live mortar shells left over from World War II, when the area was used as an artillery range.
NEWS
April 21, 2001
THE NATION'S new center of population, according to the 2000 federal census, is once more in Missouri but farther south and west -- deeper in the Ozarks. The population center, which crossed the Mississippi in 1980, had been near DeSoto and then Steelville. Now the nearest road junction is said to be Edgar Springs. Lower Missouri does have its special place names -- Annapolis, Liberal, Plato, Herculaneum Humansville. The Ozark Plateau, with its forests and folkways, is sometimes thought of as West Appalachia.
NEWS
July 29, 2012
Most of the attention after the release of results from this year's state exams for elementary and middle school students has focused on Baltimore City, where scores appear to have leveled off after years of rapid gains. But Baltimore isn't the only school system where progress has slowed. It's a statewide problem, which is why Maryland's new superintendent of schools, Lillian Lowery, has made figuring out how to get the ball rolling again one of her highest priorities. Ms. Lowery, who previously served as state school superintendent in Delaware before taking over Maryland's top education job July 1, recently visited The Sun to talk about the kinds of improvements she believes are needed to keep up the momentum for Maryland students.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | March 3, 2012
College baseball UM now 6-1; Towson's Gottlieb wins his 600th Ryan Holland delivered a two-out, bases-loaded single in the bottom of the ninth to break a 2-2 tie and lift host Maryland (6-1) to a 3-2 victory over Manhattan (1-4). The Terps are off to their best start in 37 years and have an ERA of 1.20. ... Coach Mike Gottlieb earned his 600th and 601st career victories as Towson (3-5) earned 9-2 and 6-0 victories over visiting Central Connecticut (0-2)
NEWS
February 24, 2011
June 25, 1984: Ken Singleton became the 150th player in baseball history to reach the 2,000-hit plateau.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 31, 2008
If you were not paying close attention, you probably missed much of the countdown to Manny Ramirez's imminent entry into the once-exclusive 500 Home Run Club. The Boston Red Sox arrived in town for a four-game series at Camden Yards with their big-swinging left fielder sitting at 499, which used to be considered the threshold of every power hitter's dream, but - sadly - 500 just ain't what it used to be. It was a pretty big deal when Willie Mays and Hank Aaron did it in the 1960s. It was still a big deal when Reggie Jackson did it in the 1980s.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | January 23, 2008
Genie Johns was working 12-hour shifts as a nurse at Carroll Hospital Center and holding down a part-time job in a clinic. Toss in friends and studies toward an advanced degree and her plate was full - full of everything but healthful food. Eating had become something to do in her car or in one big sitting late at night. Weary of a family history of health maladies, the 27-year-old contacted a registered dietitian about a year ago for help getting in shape. And she stuck with it, for a while anyway.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 24, 2006
Employers may have temporarily exhausted their ability to hold down increases in their annual health-benefit costs. For several years, employers have whittled the annual growth rate in their total health-benefit costs - by embracing new types of insurance plans, by redesigning plans and by shifting more costs to employees. But the National Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, released this week by Mercer Health & Benefits, says those efforts appear to have hit a plateau. Nationally, total health-benefit costs to employers rose by 6.1 percent this year, the same rate as last year and the same as expected next year, the Mercer report said, based on a survey of 3,000 U.S. employers.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham | April 6, 2001
National Conference Wichita Wings (18-21) at Toronto ThunderHawks (21-19) Tonight: Opener of best-of-three series, 7:35. Regular-season series: T-Hawks won, 4-3. Outlook: The Wings took two of the teams' last three meetings, including a 19-13 victory in Saturday's regular-season finale. Task for Toronto? Stop Wichita forward Dino Delevski, who posted a team-high 139 points - 31 against Toronto, nine on Saturday - after being tabbed a developmental player in preseason. For Toronto, which won three of four at home against the Wings, Mauro Biello, Giuliano Oliviero, and Chris Stathopoulos each reached the 100-point plateau.
TRAVEL
By Gwen Musk | November 19, 2006
For my husband and I, the moorland of Dartmoor National Park is our favorite place to hike in England. Famous as the setting for the Sherlock Holmes mystery, The Hound of the Baskervilles, the moor is actually a large granite plateau dotted with high rock formations called tors. It's mostly covered in gorse, heather and bracken, but also has a soft, marshy ground. The weather can be very unpredictable and storms can blow in without warning, causing you to lose your bearings in an instant.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - Just eight seconds into No. 24 Maryland's 112-68 victory over Liberty last night, Terrapins point guard John Gilchrist hit a three-pointer and then pounded the Comcast Center floor with his hands before getting back on defense. Gilchrist sprinted on and off the court before and after timeouts and even when he went to the bench for extended stretches of a lopsided first half in which the Terps enjoyed runs of 10-0, 16-1 and 17-3, he barely sat down. At one point, he raised his fist from the bench, glared at all five of his teammates on the court and exhorted each to keep playing hard.
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