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By Suzanne Loudermilk | September 22, 1999
Clearly colorful plastic wrapWhy settle for boring clear plastic wrap, when you can jazz up treats, school lunches and gift baskets with colorful coverings in rose, yellow, blue, green and violet from Reynolds Crystal Color Plastic Wrap? For recipes and other ideas, order a free "Quick and Easy Treats for Kids" brochure by calling the Reynolds Kitchens at 800-745-4000.Food for ThoughtSeveral nationally recognized chefs and cookbook authors will demonstrate their culinary skills at the Baltimore Book Festival this weekend in Mount Vernon Place on Charles Street.
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By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
My husband had no more turned from the grave of his mother than he said, "Now begins the search for the Holy Grail." By that, he did not mean the search for the secret offshore bank accounts. He did not mean the box of faded letters that would reveal his family to be exiled royals. He did not even mean her will. He meant her recipes. And particularly, her cookie recipes. Everybody's mother makes great cookies, except, of course, my children's mother. At a recent office bake-off, mine were the first ones dismissed from the competition.
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By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service NfB | September 18, 1991
Covering foods in your microwave serves much the same function that it does on the stovetop: It holds in moisture and heat and lets foods cook more quickly. Also, trapped steam aids in tenderizing foods, and the cover prevents splatters. (When microwaved foods are uncovered, moisture will evaporate and liquids thicken -- but not as much as in conventional cooking.)Here's a brief primer on some different ways to cover microwaved dishes:*Plastic wrap: This provides a good seal for trapping steam and creates the ideal environment for cooking vegetables and fish.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | February 25, 2004
These days nuts are no longer a dietary no-no. Walnuts, for example, are rich in omega-3 fatty acids that are good for the heart. They also contain fiber and a form of vitamin E. Here's an easy and healthful recipe from the Walnut Marketing Board to begin your day: Spray an ovenproof skillet with nonstick cooking spray, then saute 1/3 cup each of julienne yellow, red and green peppers; 1/3 cup chopped onions; and 1/2 cup chopped walnuts. In a separate bowl, beat 1 1/2 cups egg substitute and add 2 tablespoons of nonfat yogurt.
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By Susanne A. Davis and Susanne A. Davis,EATING WELL | October 1, 1997
It's the crust that generally keeps people from knowing the joys of piedom. Here, I've created a practically foolproof dough for an exceedingly tender crust.Nut pastry doughMakes 1 small crust; quantities in parentheses are for 1 large crust. To make two crusts, double the ingredients.1/4 cup walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds or pecans (use 1/3 cup for large crust)1 cup all-purpose flour (1 1/2 cups for large)1 tablespoon granulated sugar (1 1/2 tablespoons for large)1/2 teaspoon salt ( 3/4 teaspoon for large)
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | November 12, 1994
Around the house* When baking, keep a small strainer in the flour canister. That way, you can flour baking pans neatly and quickly with a few sprinkles.* Avoid messy plastic wrap that clings to frosted cakes and confections. Simply spray cooking oil onto one side of wrap, cover baked goods and dessert will be ready to serve with icing intact.* Store cartons of waxed paper, foil and plastic wrap neatly. Use empty six-pack soda or beer cartons to stash items upright, out of the way.* Oil small appliances with moving parts.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | March 18, 1995
Around the house* Store sack of sugar in plastic bag to keep from drying out. When ready to open, transfer into dry, plastic milk jug; sugar will stay dry and can be poured easily.* Open jars easily. Wrap a rubber band around lid to ensure a firm grip and twist. After opening, slide a piece of plastic wrap over top and screw on lid. Next time, lid can be twisted off easily.* Save paper dividers that are found in packages of sliced cheese; place beneath cut lemons, tomatoes or fruit when storing in refrigerator.
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | April 4, 1992
Grow an Easter basket garden. Your kids will be brimming with excitement when they observe the first sprouting seeds in their Easter basket garden. And the fast-growing spring turf will surely spur your children's imagination when they decorate the living centerpiece with miniature Easter decorations, eggs and fresh flowers.* For lush green growth by Easter weekend, be sure to start your garden in the next day or two. You'll need a medium-size Easter basket lined with heavy-duty aluminum foil or strong plastic.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | February 25, 2004
These days nuts are no longer a dietary no-no. Walnuts, for example, are rich in omega-3 fatty acids that are good for the heart. They also contain fiber and a form of vitamin E. Here's an easy and healthful recipe from the Walnut Marketing Board to begin your day: Spray an ovenproof skillet with nonstick cooking spray, then saute 1/3 cup each of julienne yellow, red and green peppers; 1/3 cup chopped onions; and 1/2 cup chopped walnuts. In a separate bowl, beat 1 1/2 cups egg substitute and add 2 tablespoons of nonfat yogurt.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 10, 2000
I'm sure that my mom's care packages were partially responsible for my marriage. When I was in college, my friends used to follow me to the mail room to be first in line to share the cartons of cookies, cakes and brownies that arrived regularly from home. But no one else ever made mother's care package list until I began dating my future husband. After Mom met him, Jeff began to receive his own sweet packages and romance blossomed from there. He wasn't about to quit dating me and lose that sweet deal.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro | October 22, 2003
Kathy Reid takes her eggs out of the refrigerator about 10 to 15 minutes before using them, so they blend more easily with the sugar and margarine in her recipes. Reid also lets the batter sit in the pan for five minutes before baking. "It seems to help the bread rise better if I do this," she says. In The Best Quickbreads, Beth Hensperger stresses beating the wet and dry ingredients separately. When mixed together, combine them "with a quick and light hand." "Bake quick loaves on the middle shelf with at least two inches of space between each pan," Hensperger says.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2003
Be honest. When you were a kid and opened your lunchbox, didn't you dig down to the bottom right away to look for the cookie? I sure did. Now, I am the one packing the cookies in the lunchbox. I want to make my cookies exceptional ones that will guarantee that the dig to the bottom of the lunchbox or bag ends happily. That the cookies taste good should be a given, but I try to add something nutritious to the ingredients. "Try this; it is good for you" is a guaranteed "cookie stopper," if I ever heard one. Instead, I play it sneaky and do not mention the healthful part.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,Special to the Sun | March 18, 2001
Fellow gardeners just have a way of bringing some of us back to earth when we get too focused on the esoterica of gardening rather than the nitty-gritty issues. For instance, at a talk I gave not so long ago, the first question asked was not about the subject I spoke on. Instead, what I heard was: "Yes, that's all wonderful and very interesting, but tell me, how can I get sweet corn on the table by the Fourth of July?" Whomp! Yet, if one person wants to know, I expect a lot of others do, too. So for those who are wondering how to perform this minor magic in their own garden, here's how to do it. First, be picky in choosing the variety.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 10, 2000
I'm sure that my mom's care packages were partially responsible for my marriage. When I was in college, my friends used to follow me to the mail room to be first in line to share the cartons of cookies, cakes and brownies that arrived regularly from home. But no one else ever made mother's care package list until I began dating my future husband. After Mom met him, Jeff began to receive his own sweet packages and romance blossomed from there. He wasn't about to quit dating me and lose that sweet deal.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | September 22, 1999
Clearly colorful plastic wrapWhy settle for boring clear plastic wrap, when you can jazz up treats, school lunches and gift baskets with colorful coverings in rose, yellow, blue, green and violet from Reynolds Crystal Color Plastic Wrap? For recipes and other ideas, order a free "Quick and Easy Treats for Kids" brochure by calling the Reynolds Kitchens at 800-745-4000.Food for ThoughtSeveral nationally recognized chefs and cookbook authors will demonstrate their culinary skills at the Baltimore Book Festival this weekend in Mount Vernon Place on Charles Street.
FEATURES
By Susanne A. Davis and Susanne A. Davis,EATING WELL | October 1, 1997
It's the crust that generally keeps people from knowing the joys of piedom. Here, I've created a practically foolproof dough for an exceedingly tender crust.Nut pastry doughMakes 1 small crust; quantities in parentheses are for 1 large crust. To make two crusts, double the ingredients.1/4 cup walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds or pecans (use 1/3 cup for large crust)1 cup all-purpose flour (1 1/2 cups for large)1 tablespoon granulated sugar (1 1/2 tablespoons for large)1/2 teaspoon salt ( 3/4 teaspoon for large)
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro | October 22, 2003
Kathy Reid takes her eggs out of the refrigerator about 10 to 15 minutes before using them, so they blend more easily with the sugar and margarine in her recipes. Reid also lets the batter sit in the pan for five minutes before baking. "It seems to help the bread rise better if I do this," she says. In The Best Quickbreads, Beth Hensperger stresses beating the wet and dry ingredients separately. When mixed together, combine them "with a quick and light hand." "Bake quick loaves on the middle shelf with at least two inches of space between each pan," Hensperger says.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | March 20, 1993
Around the house* Clean salt stains from shoes and boots. Wipe with a damp cloth that has been dipped in a mixture of 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon vinegar. Buff dry.* Remove purple price-tag spots from counter tops. Dampen a soft cloth with rubbing alcohol and take away stains.* Store bananas in the refrigerator without the skins turning dark. Place fruit inside a white plastic bag, such as a kitchen trash bag, and store inside crisper. Skins will remain yellow for several days.* Organize this year's tax files.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
Most people throw out their rotting fruits and vegetables.Alley Watada studies them for a living.Watada, a plant physiologist at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, has spent four years studying how produce breathes -- and rots. The point is to find the right temperatures and packing materials for preserving everything from asparagus to zucchini after it is picked, shipped and cut for consumption."They take in oxygen the way that people do, so how much oxygen they get is critical," said Watada, 66, of College Park.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 12, 1996
Let's prepare food for a quiet, relaxing picnic. What's on the menu? Let's start with a fabulous sandwich of nitro chicken with bread and butter pickles as hot or as mild as you like, and a little potato salad to round out the meal.Nitro chicken is hot! Hot means rich with flavor to match your taste. The flavor comes from the mustard, paprika, cumin and coriander, so it's controllable.There is something about being outdoors that makes good food taste even better. But sometimes boring, bland food just will not do. In these recipes, we have created different textures in the crusty sandwich, crispy pickles and silky potato salad.
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