Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPlastic Surgery
IN THE NEWS

Plastic Surgery

HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 20, 2012
Apparently Americans aren't happy with their chins. Chinplants are the fastest growing plastic surgery, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. And both men and women are getting the procedure. The chin and jawline are among the first parts of the face to show signs of aging and chin implants can make people look more youthful, the group said. The procedure saw a 71 percent increase from 2010 to 2011, when 20,680 people got chin augmentation. Women had led the trend with 10,087 of the surgeries, but men weren't far behind with 10,593 procedures.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Many teens are unhappy with their appearance and ask their parents for a "nose job," or rhinoplasty. But there are a lot of factors to consider, such as the limits of surgery, the long-term effects and possible complications, according to Dr. Patrick J. Byrne, a facial plastic surgery specialist who practices at the Johns Hopkins Cosmetic Center at Green Spring Station. Byrne, also an assistant professor at Hopkins School of Medicine, says there are better techniques to make the surgery successful, but this is still a big decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
Rob Groomes, the lead server and bartender at Portalli's, was severely injured on the night of March 6 while attempting to break up a fight just over the Main Street bridge in Baltimore County. The owners of Portalli's are throwing a fundraiser for Rob at their other property, the nearby Diamondback Tavern. A $5 cover, 25 percent of the food sales and a 50/50 raffle will go toward plastic surgery to repair damage done to Rob's face and eye. Drink specials include $1 domestics and $2 imports and call brands.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 7, 2011
Dr. Chi-Tsung Su, a plastic surgeon and teacher who helped establish the prominence of the burn center at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, died of cancer Dec. 27 at his Towson home. He was 74. Born in Taiwan, he earned a medical degree at the National Taiwan University. He moved to Baltimore in 1964 and became a Union Memorial Hospital surgical intern and its chief resident. Among his teachers was Dr. Bowdoin Davis, a plastic surgeon whose father, Dr. John Staige Davis, wrote a 1919 plastic surgery textbook, the first U.S. text in the field.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 24, 2010
I've always been in favor of making the most of who I am, living every day to the fullest, and being the best I can be. That's why I exercise, drink a lot of water, and write topic sentences that sound like a blend of advertising for Geritol and the United States Army. But I'm becoming increasing aggravated by the constant cosmetic-surgery messaging directed primarily at women — urging us to plump our lips, ease our wrinkles and lift our eyebrows — right on up to the advanced age when we'll need to use a wheelchair on the way into the operating room as well as on the way out. Oh, I've thought about cosmetic surgery, to be sure.
HEALTH
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
P lastic surgery might have been hurt by the recession, but it still draws a sizable following of people hoping to improve their appearance. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reports that some major cosmetic surgery procedures, such as breast augmentation and liposuction, declined between 2007 and 2008 - the most recent figures available. But minimally invasive procedures grew in popularity during the same period. That includes treatments with Botox, laser skin resurfacing, and laser treatment of veins in the legs.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | April 13, 2008
The Los Angeles Times reports that, after years of steady growth -- especially among the middle classes, the cosmetic surgery industry is suffering nips and tucks because of the shaky economy. While I'm sure that's a factor, I think there would be a lot more plastic surgery in this country if so many women my age weren't wimps. We are afraid to have any work done because we are convinced we are going to be the one that dies while under the elective knife, necessitating one of those awkward obituaries.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
The Baltimore-Washington Corridor Chamber of Commerce will hold a networking mixer and mini trade show from p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Holiday Inn Laurel West, 15101 Sweitzer Lane. The cost is $20 for members with prepaid reservations; $40 for nonmembers and at the door. Information: 301-725-4000, ext. 109. Session to focus on linking executives The Chesapeake Regional Tech Council will hold a "TechConnect Match & Pit Session" from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at Loews Annapolis Hotel's PowerHouse, 126 West St., Annapolis.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
TELEVISION LAW & ORDER / / 9 p.m. Wednesday. WBAL-TV (Channel 11). ....................... The longest-running cop drama on television returns for its 18th season this week with lots of changes. Jack McCoy (Sam Waterston) is the new district attorney, and Detective Edward Green (Jesse L. Martin) has a new partner, Cyrus Lupo (Jeremy Sisto). There are a couple of new assistant DAs as well: Connie Rubirosa (Alana De La Garza) and Michael Cutter (Linus Roache). Happily, Lt. Anita Van Buren (S. Epatha Merkerson)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.