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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 20, 2012
Apparently Americans aren't happy with their chins. Chinplants are the fastest growing plastic surgery, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. And both men and women are getting the procedure. The chin and jawline are among the first parts of the face to show signs of aging and chin implants can make people look more youthful, the group said. The procedure saw a 71 percent increase from 2010 to 2011, when 20,680 people got chin augmentation. Women had led the trend with 10,087 of the surgeries, but men weren't far behind with 10,593 procedures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Derek Chavis and For The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
MEOW! The claws were out and ready to stab hearts, backs and everything in-between during tonight's "The Real Housewives of Miami" reunion finale! We pick up right where we left off Monday, with Joanna cracking up in her dressing room as her makeup artist calls Lisa a whore, cheap, untalented and broke. The guy seriously looks like Danny DeVito, though, so I don't know. Lisa comesw back and she and Joanna immediately get into it. Lisa starts airing all of Joanna's dirty laundry: her jewelry was on loan all season, she has heard Joanna was a hooker.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland health officials may ask state lawmakers for permission to oversee plastic surgery centers, a move inspired in part by the death of a Lochearn woman after liposuction. The state health department had already been considering whether to ask for a change to the legal definition of free-standing surgery centers to align regulations with medical risk instead of insurance billing practices, Secretary Joshua Sharfstein said. Surgical centers currently are subject to state inspection only if they meet certain criteria in how they bill insurance companies, he said.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
For reporter Jean Marbella to take shots at Dr. Ben Carson for his political views makes her look like she is not too bright - particularly in a Baltimore-based (albeit liberal) newspaper ( "Carson is quoting Lenin to criticize Obamacare. Is the reference bogus?" Oct. 12). I know that Dr. Carson is not a Democrat, but that doesn't make him a criminal, does it? Is that what we have come to? Dr. Carson is a phenomenal individual with a pretty good resume I would gladly put up against anyone at The Sun. Despite having been raised in dire poverty in a single-parent household in Detroit, he rose to become a full professor of neurosurgery, oncology, plastic surgery and pediatrics and directed the department of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins for more than 25 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrea K. Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
With each cute baby Crystal Neilson delivered, she found her body more unattractive. Her breasts sagged a little more. The skin on her stomach stretched out like a deflated balloon. “There was stuff falling out all over the place,” said the 34-year-old real estate broker. After four kids, Neilson had enough of camouflaging her flab and flaws with circulation-binding Spanx. In March, Neilson decided to say goodbye to her post-baby body. She had her breasts lifted and increased two cup sizes, her stomach smoothed and flattened with a tummy tuck and her love handles shaped and slimmed with liposuction.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | June 1, 2007
In the midst of the obesity epidemic, is it true that some people are having surgery to increase the size of their derrieres? It's not only true, but the practice is booming! According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the number of "buttock lifts" increased nationwide 283 percent between 2000 and 2005, from 1,356 to 5,193. An American pioneer of the so-called "Brazilian Butt Lift," Dr. Anthony Griffin, a Beverly Hills, Calif., plastic surgeon, said the most popular form of buttock enhancement, or gluteal augmentation, is "autologous fat transfer."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | October 27, 2007
Roxanne Guy and Stephen M. Milner are the two faces of plastic surgery. In Melbourne, Fla., Guy performs tummy tucks, face-lifts, Botox and breast augmentations. Miller, who heads the burn unit at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, honed his skills as a plastic surgeon with the British army in the first Persian Gulf war. They will meet with colleagues from around the country in Baltimore this weekend as the American Society of Plastic Surgeons begins its five-day annual convention here.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1991
Considering all that the little German shepherd puppy has been through, it seems entirely appropriate that her name turns out to be Lucky.Abandoned by her owners and subsequently injured in a hit-and-run accident in Cape St. Claire, 17-week-old Lucky is now one of the few dogs to have undergone sophisticated plastic surgery."
BUSINESS
By Julie Claire Diop and Julie Claire Diop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
Some people turn to career coaches or resume doctors for help finding jobs. Others join networking groups to locate new clients. And then there are those who seek out plastic surgeons to give them an edge. Brian Bretan wants no one to think that he's run out of steam. The 59-year-old job seeker from Smithtown, N.Y., has had doctors remove the bags under his eyes, give him a fuller head of hair and erase his age spots. Now, he said, "I like the way I look." He's had two job interviews for pharmaceutical sales positions in the past couple of weeks, and expects to have at least two more in the coming weeks.
FEATURES
By Gail Shister and Gail Shister,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 2004
Can we cut? In a stroke of master casting, funny fashionista Joan Rivers will play herself in the season finale of Nip/Tuck, FX's hit drama about a booming plastic-surgery practice in Miami. It runs Oct. 5. "This is like John Gotti being on The Sopranos," says creator-executive producer Ryan Murphy. "It's the ultimate typecasting and the ultimate hot-button discussion topic." In the story line, Rivers, 71, who has done riffs on her many nips and tucks, goes to Drs. Sean McNamara (Dylan Walsh)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrea K. Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
With each cute baby Crystal Neilson delivered, she found her body more unattractive. Her breasts sagged a little more. The skin on her stomach stretched out like a deflated balloon. “There was stuff falling out all over the place,” said the 34-year-old real estate broker. After four kids, Neilson had enough of camouflaging her flab and flaws with circulation-binding Spanx. In March, Neilson decided to say goodbye to her post-baby body. She had her breasts lifted and increased two cup sizes, her stomach smoothed and flattened with a tummy tuck and her love handles shaped and slimmed with liposuction.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 23, 2013
A Swiss businessman has given the The University of Maryland School of Medicine $2.5 million to create a professorship in plastic and reconstructive surgery with the first awarded to the doctor who recently performed a groundbreaking face transplant. Dr. Eduardo D. Rodriguez will be invested at a ceremony later this year. He led a team last year in a 36-hour face transplant that included replacement of both jaws, teeth, tongue, skin and underlying nerve and muscle tissue from the scalp to the neck.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland health officials may ask state lawmakers for permission to oversee plastic surgery centers, a move inspired in part by the death of a Lochearn woman after liposuction. The state health department had already been considering whether to ask for a change to the legal definition of free-standing surgery centers to align regulations with medical risk instead of insurance billing practices, Secretary Joshua Sharfstein said. Surgical centers currently are subject to state inspection only if they meet certain criteria in how they bill insurance companies, he said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
A bill to give health regulators more oversight of facilities like the now-closed Monarch Medspa in Timonium is making a late surge in the General Assembly after weeks of discussions among state and industry officials. The House of Delegates unanimously passed the legislation Monday afternoon. It needs to clear the Senate, including an extra procedural step, within the next week. The legislative session draws to a close April 8. If passed, the law would close a regulatory gap that does not allow state health officials to proactively inspect and oversee plastic surgery centers.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Ace, a youthful Labrador, bounds across his lawn, fielding tennis balls and hurrying them back to his owner. His tail wags. His coat is thick and shiny. He barks with enthusiasm. To the naked eye, Ace is a strapping example of dogdom. Who would guess that he's had work done? An eye job, in fact. Ace is one of thousands of dogs who've had plastic surgery. A little nip. A little tuck. Eye lifts. Nose jobs. Exactly the sorts of procedures people get. But unlike cosmetic surgery for humans, dogs and cats aren't doing it to look better at their high school reunion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Dr. Bernard "Bernie" Kapiloff, a retired plastic surgeon who had also been the longtime publisher of the Montgomery County Sentinel as well as a civil rights activist and philanthropist, died Oct. 10 from complications of a stroke at Roland Park Place. The Homeland resident was 95. "Bernie was fiercely independent, engaged and very bright. He was interested in being out in the community and spoke his mind. He knew the facts," said U.S. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, a friend for more than 40 years.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 22, 2003
Cable channel FX is not afraid to shock or offend. That willingness to take risks helped The Shield, FX's intensely violent and morally ambiguous cop drama, cut through the clutter two years ago. And, hard as it might be to imagine, the network has an even more graphic, bloody and daring drama premiering tonight. Nip/Tuck is a medical series set in the world of plastic surgery in Miami's South Beach. I thought I couldn't care less about the milieu until I saw the pilot. The script features a skillfully crafted variation of the buddy-film narrative that takes two male partners, breaks them up and then brings them back together once they've been bloodied and wizened.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 27, 1998
NEW YORK -- Standing in front of the full-length mirror, the girl fights back tears. Her thighs are too big, her breasts too small and her nose bumpy. Or so this 16-year-old thinks, comparing herself with "Baywatch" babes and Victoria's Secret models.To make matters worse, boys never call, and getting undressed for gym is a mortification. But such problems have quick fixes, the magazine ads promise."If I can look better, why not?" the girl asked during a recent consultation with a plastic surgeon.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Darren O'Day doesn't just transcend the dumb-jock stereotype. He shatters it into tiny pieces. He scored high enough on his entrance exam to get into medical school. Scored high enough on another entrance exam to get into law school. But right now he's too content with his gig as a quietly effective side-arm reliever for the Orioles to think about doing anything else. "I knew I wanted to play baseball," the 29-year-old right-hander says now. "You can't give up that opportunity for anything.
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