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HEALTH
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
P lastic surgery might have been hurt by the recession, but it still draws a sizable following of people hoping to improve their appearance. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reports that some major cosmetic surgery procedures, such as breast augmentation and liposuction, declined between 2007 and 2008 - the most recent figures available. But minimally invasive procedures grew in popularity during the same period. That includes treatments with Botox, laser skin resurfacing, and laser treatment of veins in the legs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrea K. Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
With each cute baby Crystal Neilson delivered, she found her body more unattractive. Her breasts sagged a little more. The skin on her stomach stretched out like a deflated balloon. “There was stuff falling out all over the place,” said the 34-year-old real estate broker. After four kids, Neilson had enough of camouflaging her flab and flaws with circulation-binding Spanx. In March, Neilson decided to say goodbye to her post-baby body. She had her breasts lifted and increased two cup sizes, her stomach smoothed and flattened with a tummy tuck and her love handles shaped and slimmed with liposuction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 18, 2004
Like many plastic surgeons, Dr. Randal Haworth has developed a complex relationship with reality TV shows that feature surgical makeovers. Haworth, who set up shop in Beverly Hills, Calif., in 1995, readily acknowledges that he has benefited from the increased interest in plastic surgery that productions such as ABC's Extreme Makeover and MTV's I Want a Famous Face have sparked. In 2003, the number of cosmetic procedures performed nationally - from liposuction and tummy tucks to Botox treatments - jumped by 33 percent over the year before, reaching 8.7 million.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland is moving to toughen regulations on the fast-growing medspa industry - a move designed to narrow a "loophole" and prevent deaths such as one last year following a liposuction treatment at a Timonium facility. Regulations being discussed by state officials would bar plastic surgeons from performing liposuction and other procedures in medspas and medical offices unless the facilities are inspected by the government or third-party accrediting bodies, Maryland Secretary of Health Joshua Sharfstein said.
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | November 1, 2007
Juan Cruz, a former Defense Department accountant, was burned over 50 percent of his body when terrorists crashed an airliner into the Pentagon on Sept 11, 2001. "All I remember is that I was burning. My clothes were burning, and there was smoke all around," said Cruz, 57. Since then, he has been through 40 surgical procedures, two cornea transplants and major facial reconstruction. He has had to give up driving because his vision is so clouded. But Cruz, whose face was reconstructed at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, represents a patient that plastic surgeons are seeing more often these days: the kind who wouldn't have survived years ago. As military surgeons, hospital emergency departments and urban trauma centers improve survival rates for victims critically injured in fires and accidents and on battlefields, their patients are increasingly winding up in the care of specialists whose domain has long been associated with the tummy tuck and the nose job. "There's no question more people are surviving, and it's creating a whole new set of challenges," said Dr. Paul Cederna, a plastic surgeon from the University of Michigan Health Systems, who joined 6,000 colleagues in Baltimore this week for the American Society of Plastic Surgeons' annual convention.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 3, 2003
Men accounted for 21 percent of the 1.6 million cosmetic surgeries and 13 percent of the almost 5 million nonsurgical cosmetic procedures (like Botox injections and chemical peels) performed in the United States last year, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The most popular fixes were: nose reshaping liposuction eyelid surgery Fifty-four percent of patients having surgeons flatten protruding ears were male.
NEWS
December 14, 1995
An article Tuesday in the Today section should have noted that the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, which provides referrals for experienced cosmetic surgeons, is not recognized by the American Medical Association as a specialty board. (Its members practice cosmetic surgery, but their medical school training is in another field such as dermatology.) The AMA-recognized cosmetic surgery association is the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc., at (310) 595-4255. Its members are plastic surgeons.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol | December 12, 1995
CLARIFICATIONAn article Tuesday in the Today section should have noted that the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, which provides referrals for experienced cosmetic surgeons, is not recognized by the American Medical Association as a specialty board. (Its members practice cosmetic surgery, but their medical school training is in another field such as dermatology.) The AMA-recognized cosmetic surgery association is the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc., at (310) 595-4255.
NEWS
December 13, 1994
Plastic surgeons get certified by boardDrs. C. Daniel Laughlin and John L. LeRoy recently received board certification from the American Board of Plastic Surgery.Both doctors recently returned from Croatia, where they donated their services to seriously wounded Croation soldiers.NB The surgeons work at Plastic Surgery Specialists of Annapolis.Coordinator chosen to examine blood pressureNorth Arundel Hospital Professional Center (NAHPC) has named Christine Gasiorowski as its new blood pressure coordinator.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 20, 2012
Apparently Americans aren't happy with their chins. Chinplants are the fastest growing plastic surgery, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. And both men and women are getting the procedure. The chin and jawline are among the first parts of the face to show signs of aging and chin implants can make people look more youthful, the group said. The procedure saw a 71 percent increase from 2010 to 2011, when 20,680 people got chin augmentation. Women had led the trend with 10,087 of the surgeries, but men weren't far behind with 10,593 procedures.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Darren O'Day doesn't just transcend the dumb-jock stereotype. He shatters it into tiny pieces. He scored high enough on his entrance exam to get into medical school. Scored high enough on another entrance exam to get into law school. But right now he's too content with his gig as a quietly effective side-arm reliever for the Orioles to think about doing anything else. "I knew I wanted to play baseball," the 29-year-old right-hander says now. "You can't give up that opportunity for anything.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 20, 2012
Apparently Americans aren't happy with their chins. Chinplants are the fastest growing plastic surgery, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. And both men and women are getting the procedure. The chin and jawline are among the first parts of the face to show signs of aging and chin implants can make people look more youthful, the group said. The procedure saw a 71 percent increase from 2010 to 2011, when 20,680 people got chin augmentation. Women had led the trend with 10,087 of the surgeries, but men weren't far behind with 10,593 procedures.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Many teens are unhappy with their appearance and ask their parents for a "nose job," or rhinoplasty. But there are a lot of factors to consider, such as the limits of surgery, the long-term effects and possible complications, according to Dr. Patrick J. Byrne, a facial plastic surgery specialist who practices at the Johns Hopkins Cosmetic Center at Green Spring Station. Byrne, also an assistant professor at Hopkins School of Medicine, says there are better techniques to make the surgery successful, but this is still a big decision.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
Some women who want rounder, fuller buttocks are turning to a dangerous cosmetic procedure: illegal injections of silicone offered by people who lack medical training and may buy their supplies in home improvement stores. The trend — which has already sent one exotic dancer from Baltimore's Block to the hospital with silicone in her lungs — has alarmed public health officials and plastic surgeons, who say the injections can maim or kill recipients. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other agencies have been investigating the incident in Baltimore and others across the country.
EXPLORE
November 7, 2011
John Alexander a five-year employee with the Harford County Department of Public Works, Division of Water and Sewer has been selected as the Employee of the Month for October. John was nominated by his supervisors, Dave Gosnell and George Dawson, from the Division of Water & Sewer. Recently Alexander went "above and beyond" by coming to the immediate aid of his co-worker George Kmieciak, after an ATV flipped backwards and landed on him when Kmieciak was attempting to load it onto a truck, according to a Harford County press release.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 7, 2011
Dr. Chi-Tsung Su, a plastic surgeon and teacher who helped establish the prominence of the burn center at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, died of cancer Dec. 27 at his Towson home. He was 74. Born in Taiwan, he earned a medical degree at the National Taiwan University. He moved to Baltimore in 1964 and became a Union Memorial Hospital surgical intern and its chief resident. Among his teachers was Dr. Bowdoin Davis, a plastic surgeon whose father, Dr. John Staige Davis, wrote a 1919 plastic surgery textbook, the first U.S. text in the field.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland is moving to toughen regulations on the fast-growing medspa industry - a move designed to narrow a "loophole" and prevent deaths such as one last year following a liposuction treatment at a Timonium facility. Regulations being discussed by state officials would bar plastic surgeons from performing liposuction and other procedures in medspas and medical offices unless the facilities are inspected by the government or third-party accrediting bodies, Maryland Secretary of Health Joshua Sharfstein said.
NEWS
By Andrea Coombes and Andrea Coombes,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 28, 2003
While uncertain economic times slowed Americans' rush to plastic surgery, some cheaper and less invasive procedures are seeing steep increases in rates of adoption -- particularly among men. While the number of women seeing a doctor for cosmetic procedures dropped 14 percent last year from 2001, the number of men doing so stayed flat, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. And some procedures saw increases in men's adoption rates. From Botox injections to laser skin resurfacing and microdermabrasion, men are eager to make themselves look younger and healthier, experts said.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 24, 2010
I've always been in favor of making the most of who I am, living every day to the fullest, and being the best I can be. That's why I exercise, drink a lot of water, and write topic sentences that sound like a blend of advertising for Geritol and the United States Army. But I'm becoming increasing aggravated by the constant cosmetic-surgery messaging directed primarily at women — urging us to plump our lips, ease our wrinkles and lift our eyebrows — right on up to the advanced age when we'll need to use a wheelchair on the way into the operating room as well as on the way out. Oh, I've thought about cosmetic surgery, to be sure.
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