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By Kim Clark | September 19, 1990
Time was, the best thing about plastic laundry soap bottles was that nothing happened to them. They didn't break when dropped. The detergents inside didn't dissolve them. They lasted forever.Nowadays, though, the worst thing about those plastic laundry bottles is that nothing happens to them. Long after they have been emptied and discarded, they endure.As a result, at least three area plastics and detergent companies have begun looking for ways to make the cheap and colorful packaging a little friendlier to the environment.
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NEWS
April 9, 2014
Purging the drawers, cubbies, shelves, under-sink storage, and medicine chest in the bathroom is a dreadful job, one that must be done at regular intervals. That's every 17 years, in my opinion. I prefer to do it myself, rather than to let Doug try. He can't tell the difference between the leg-shavers that slice my shins to shreds and the ones that don't, which can lead to surprises in the shower that resemble the murder scene from "Psycho. " Our bathroom contains the usual complement of shampoos, conditioners, body wash, toothpaste, mouthwash, various unguents, salves and gels; and a collection of tweezers, cuticle scissors, hair dryers, toenail clippers, nose- and ear-hair trimmers, and make-up applicators — and that's just the stuff on the countertop.
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NEWS
June 9, 2010
Thanks to the gutless city council, all of the advertising money spent by the beverage industry has paid off by defeating the bottle tax. Instead of a tax that would at least partially (if not mostly) raise money from people coming into the city and on goods that are either not good for your health (sugar drinks) or for the environment (plastic bottles), now we have a plan with more taxes that affect only residents. We have an increase in the income tax rate, increase on telephone line taxes, and a reduction to early property tax payment discounts.
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Editorial from The Aegis | April 18, 2013
Some things retain value long after their usefulness is part of history. Pen knives are a case in point. No one, save the occasional Colonial era re-enactor, uses bird quills as writing implements, yet pen knives, the pocket-sized folding blades that made it possible to turn feathers in to pens, are as popular as ever. It's likely there are more homes that own a pen knife or two than homes that don't. They're not necessarily all that useful, but they have a practical appeal. Same goes for gourds.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | August 15, 1991
Marylanders who are ecology-conscious but buy products in plastic containers have some good news:Empty two-liter soda bottles are more easily recycled today than they were a year ago.But, while those who recycle their plastic bottles may take pride in knowing they are diverting some wastes from landfills, there are some plastics they still can't recycle.Workers at area recycling centers are turning away people who bring such containers as margarine tubs, packages for baby wipes and yogurt cups.
NEWS
July 6, 2007
Bottle bill helps put plastic in its place I was glad to see the editorial about San Francisco's ban on bottled water for city departments ("Thirst quencher," July 1). Americans' love of individual containers of water is not only costly to drinkers but has other, more harmful effects. We have seen an explosion of plastic bottles showing up as debris in our rivers and the bay. Last September, at the International Coastal Cleanup's event in Maryland, 6,239 plastic bottles were collected.
NEWS
January 9, 1991
The County Commissioners are encouraging citizens to participate in recycling programs that will help meet the state recycling law.The following information will assist you in joining the countywide effort.A. Carroll County Recycling Center: Route 97 near airport; 848-CANS, 848-4124 or 857-2177; open 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; drop off available at all timesAccepted items:* Aluminum cans: (purchased from you by the pound)* Cardboard: (corrugated, flat, clean; includes cereal boxes)
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Editorial from The Aegis | April 18, 2013
Some things retain value long after their usefulness is part of history. Pen knives are a case in point. No one, save the occasional Colonial era re-enactor, uses bird quills as writing implements, yet pen knives, the pocket-sized folding blades that made it possible to turn feathers in to pens, are as popular as ever. It's likely there are more homes that own a pen knife or two than homes that don't. They're not necessarily all that useful, but they have a practical appeal. Same goes for gourds.
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By L'Oreal Thompson | November 22, 2011
Thinking green all year long? Whether it's bling for a holiday party or a bone for the family pooch, it's easy choosing great green gifts this season. 1. Perfect for a night out with the girls or a day at the mall, a fun magazine clutch is hand woven from recycled magazines. $35 at Uncommongoods.com . 2. Get ready to rock and roll with these record bookends handmade from vintage 45 rpm records. This gift is sure to be a hit with the music lover on your list.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
As you rinse those bottles and cans, bag your waste paper and lug out your recycling bin, take heart: In helping the environment, you're also saving some tax money.But maybe not as much as you'd think.Though recycling looked like a financial bonanza for local governments just five years ago, Howard County now has to pay processing plants to take its tons of recycled bottles, cans and paper.The reason: the surprising success of local recycling programs, which now send one out of every four tons of Maryland's household and office trash to a recycling plant, not a landfill.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Will consumers pay $20 for a reusable glass drinking bottle? Walt Himelstein thinks so. The Owings Mills environmental chemist and entrepreneur invented the Pure reusable glass drinking bottle, which features a shock-absorbing plastic sleeve that holds the glass together if it breaks. Himelstein, 59, hopes to tap a surging interest among environmentally conscious consumers who want their own reusable bottles, rather than buying beverages in single-use glass, metal or plastic containers.
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By L'Oreal Thompson | November 22, 2011
Thinking green all year long? Whether it's bling for a holiday party or a bone for the family pooch, it's easy choosing great green gifts this season. 1. Perfect for a night out with the girls or a day at the mall, a fun magazine clutch is hand woven from recycled magazines. $35 at Uncommongoods.com . 2. Get ready to rock and roll with these record bookends handmade from vintage 45 rpm records. This gift is sure to be a hit with the music lover on your list.
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October 11, 2011
Editor: Pay attention, folks. We are trashing the world and hurricanes and the ensuing floods are throwing it back at us. Making a wreck of our world is not like making a wreck of our childhood bedrooms; Mother Nature, unlike our own mothers, cannot pick up the garbage we strew and the municipal, county, state and federal services are either unwilling or unable to take care of the mess.  Delighted by the perfect autumn weather this past...
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2010
Everyone in the neighborhood knows Mary Dantzler won't tolerate trash on the sidewalks or in the streets. A homeowner in Druid Heights for 15 years, she sweeps every day and believes along the way she's cleaning out all sorts of other urban ills. "I've stayed on the job with a broom," said Dantzler, who was out Saturday morning with a couple of dozen other neighbors, business owners and church members to pick up in some other corners and alleys. They joined about 2,000 people in 124 Baltimore neighborhoods who were participating in the city's fall cleanup day. In addition to collecting old food wrappers and plastic bottles, they hoped to build an anti-littering ethic in a town where many still don't think twice about tossing waste onto the street or out of the car window.
NEWS
June 9, 2010
Thanks to the gutless city council, all of the advertising money spent by the beverage industry has paid off by defeating the bottle tax. Instead of a tax that would at least partially (if not mostly) raise money from people coming into the city and on goods that are either not good for your health (sugar drinks) or for the environment (plastic bottles), now we have a plan with more taxes that affect only residents. We have an increase in the income tax rate, increase on telephone line taxes, and a reduction to early property tax payment discounts.
NEWS
September 8, 2008
Columbia Democrats to hold forum on slots The Columbia Democratic Club will hold a community forum on November's slot machine gambling referendum Wednesday night. The event will feature Del. Frank S. Turner, a Howard County Democrat who helped craft the proposal, and Aaron Meisner, the chairman of Stop Slots Maryland. Voters will decide in November whether to amend Maryland's constitution to allow 15,000 slot machines divided among five locations around the state. The forum, which is open to the public, is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. at the Jeffers Hill Neighborhood Center, 6030 Tamar Drive.
NEWS
September 8, 2008
Columbia Democrats to hold forum on slots The Columbia Democratic Club will hold a community forum on November's slot machine gambling referendum Wednesday night. The event will feature Del. Frank S. Turner, a Howard County Democrat who helped craft the proposal, and Aaron Meisner, the chairman of Stop Slots Maryland. Voters will decide in November whether to amend Maryland's constitution to allow 15,000 slot machines divided among five locations around the state. The forum, which is open to the public, is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. at the Jeffers Hill Neighborhood Center, 6030 Tamar Drive.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2003
Summertime is getting easier for coffee lovers as choices expand in the bottled-coffee category. Starbucks' successful Frappuccino is getting some competition on store shelves, and competition is good news for consumers. For folks more comfortable with a familiar brand of coffee than with a $3-a-cup java habit, Folgers has good news. Its new Jakada drink offers a sweet combination of Mountain Grown Folger's coffee and low-fat milk. The drink comes in 10.5-ounce, single-serve plastic bottles - no need to worry about broken glass with this drink - and is available in three flavors: French Roast, Vanilla and Mocha.
NEWS
September 15, 2007
Progress in Iraq will prove fleeting Reports of "progress" in Iraq - and really, the claim is about progress in one province - deserve our skepticism ("`Uneven' progress in Iraq," Sept. 11). Here's what some of the approximately $3 billion per week the United States is spending on the war in Iraq is doing: We are now giving money and military aid to Sunni militias who were insurgents. In return, they have done two things: First, they have forced many of the Shiites out of Anbar province, and second, they are fighting al-Qaida.
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