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NEWS
February 8, 2014
I was amazed to learn the Baltimore City Council has failed to pass a 10-cent tax on plastic bags provided by grocers and other vendors ( "Bag tax economics," Jan. 22). Baltimore City lags many other large cities in the U.S. in the pursuit of eliminating this wasteful means to carry home one's groceries. Many cities have eliminated the bags altogether since they will remain in landfills for many years before disintegrating. In addition, the highways are littered with the bags, which are very unsightly to say the least.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Environmentalists will team up Saturday to build support for a 5-cent plastic bag fee in Baltimore by handing out reusable bags and taking part in a citywide cleanup effort. Blue Water Baltimore, Waterfront Partnership, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Trash Free Maryland Alliance, Clean Water Action and volunteers will fan out across Baltimore to pick up litter in a show of support for legislation introduced by Councilman James B. Kraft that would impose a fee on most plastic bags distributed in the city.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
M ore holiday shoppers this year are using cash or debit cards to avoid overspending with credit cards. But what about the rest of the year? Is it possible in a credit-dependent society to get by without plastic? "Credit cards are not necessary," says Ed Fredericks, a finance professor at Pepperdine University. "Originally, credit was seen as a privilege. Soon it kind of turned into something that everyone had to have. Multiple cards were mailed out to people, whether they were able to carry credit or not."
NEWS
May 14, 2014
The check-out inquiry was "paper or plastic?" But it's no longer a choice. Merchants love plastic. It's easy to store and less expensive than paper. Multiple bags can handle heavier items. Thin plastic wraps around whatever is in the bag and around one's hand. But that clinging feature is horrible for the aquatic environment ( "Plastic bag fee for city shoppers proposed - again," May 9). The new bag ban fans are local governments. Montgomery County and Washington, D.C., have them.
NEWS
March 24, 2010
Everyone wants "to see fewer bags tossed onto streets and alleys," as your editorial puts it ("Paper, plastic or meaningless legislation?" March 18). Fortunately the Baltimore City Council did not agree that a confusing new tax is the only way to achieve this. Most states and cities that have wrestled with bag policy have opted for strong recycling programs and citizen education -- not new taxes. Baltimore shoppers today have ample access to recycling bins for plastic retail bags, dry cleaning bags, product wraps -- even this newspaper's delivery bags!
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2010
A woman whose body was found wrapped in plastic has been identified as a 42-year-old who had been reported missing Wednesday. She was found in her own home, police said. Police responded to the 1800 block of 29th St. Saturday afternoon for a report of a body wrapped in a tarp. Detective Kevin Brown, a city police spokesman, said a relative found the body in the basement and called police. Brown said the victim, Karen Ferrell, had been reported missing Dec. 15. A cause of death had not been confirmed pending an autopsy, and no suspects or motives were available.
NEWS
December 27, 1999
Imagine life without the plastic development in the last 100 years -- from your nylon stockings to your contact lenses. The Greek word "Plastikos" means it plastic is the moleblages of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and other atoms are unwiedly chain or ring structures that can't be packed closely, so they are flexible. The first 19th-century plastics were cellulose-based: Bandaging material, billiard balls, false teeth, combs, shirt collars. New each year the world produces about 225 billion pounds of plastic -- press-on fingernails, hip-replacement joints, Spandex, packing peanuts, cheap explosives for terrorists.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | February 20, 1993
A Senate committee has approved a bill that would give the state Department of the Environment broad powers to regulate new landfills.Another measure to require that certain plastic bottles and containers sold in the state contain 25 percent recycled material also received a favorable vote.But the Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee delayed the effective date until 1996.The landfill bill, Senate Bill 310, authorizes the state to take into account several factors when licensing new trash disposal areas or expansions of old facilities.
BUSINESS
By Allison Becker and Allison Becker,Cox News Service | July 29, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Americans are throwing away billions of pounds of the clear plastic that soft-drink bottles and other containers are made of, even as demand for the recycled material soars. The plastic, polyethylene terephthalate, or PET, appears on grocery shelves and in vending machines as containers for soft drinks, water, shampoo, ketchup and other products on a list that gets longer every year. The most recent survey by the National Association for PET Container Resources, an industry trade group, shows that last year more than 5 billion pounds of PET was used in plastic containers.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 23, 2013
A Swiss businessman has given the The University of Maryland School of Medicine $2.5 million to create a professorship in plastic and reconstructive surgery with the first awarded to the doctor who recently performed a groundbreaking face transplant. Dr. Eduardo D. Rodriguez will be invested at a ceremony later this year. He led a team last year in a 36-hour face transplant that included replacement of both jaws, teeth, tongue, skin and underlying nerve and muscle tissue from the scalp to the neck.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
A renewed effort is underway in Baltimore to impose a fee on most plastic bags handed out in city stores - and supporters believe that charging a nickel for each bag, rather than a dime, will allow the measure to gain enough backing to become law. But some local retailers have joined environmentalists in saying that the city needs to put the charge on both paper and plastic bags. Environmentalists want to encourage city shoppers to carry reusable bags to preserve resources and reduce litter.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Having circumnavigated the Americas on his own, Annapolis-based sailor Matt Rutherford has turned his attention to researching plastics' effects on environment Matt Rutherford is more comfortable on water than he is on land. As he sat recently for an interview at the U.S. Sailing Hall of Fame in Annapolis, Rutherford was clearly eager to get the next expedition for his Ocean Research Project underway. Talk about having cabin fever: Rutherford spent much of the winter cooped up in the same 42-foot steel schooner on which he and marine biologist Nicole Trenholm sailed to the Azores last summer to research the effects plastics have on the North Atlantic Gyre, one of the world's five major ocean current systems.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | April 15, 2014
Cash or credit? Cash: At the Hot Stove restaurant on Cape Cod, which I visit every summer vacation for one of their tasty burgers served on English muffins, patrons must pay their tab in cash or by check. A few years ago, the pub stopped taking credit cards to avoid paying transaction fees to Visa and MasterCard. There's an on-site ATM for customers unaware of the new policy. If this sounds like a stupid, even selfish business decision, think again: Each year the Hot Stove's owners donate the amount saved in transaction fees to local charities.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
Baltimore County school officials found a gun that shoots plastic pellets in the backpack of a student at Charlesmont Elementary School in Dundalk on Wednesday. Students tipped off school officials who went to the student's class and found the air soft gun, according to Dale Rauenzahn, Baltimore County's executive director of student support services. The student first brought the gun to school Tuesday, Rauenzahn said, and school officials are trying to encourage students to come forward immediately when they have information about a weapon.
NEWS
February 8, 2014
I was amazed to learn the Baltimore City Council has failed to pass a 10-cent tax on plastic bags provided by grocers and other vendors ( "Bag tax economics," Jan. 22). Baltimore City lags many other large cities in the U.S. in the pursuit of eliminating this wasteful means to carry home one's groceries. Many cities have eliminated the bags altogether since they will remain in landfills for many years before disintegrating. In addition, the highways are littered with the bags, which are very unsightly to say the least.
NEWS
February 1, 2014
The city's proposed 10-cent bag tax was unwarranted and burdensome to the citizens of Baltimore ( "City Council votes down 10-cent bag fee," Jan 27). I along with most of my neighbors in Belair-Edison reuse or recycle our plastic and paper bags. The disposable bags are a hygienic necessity for those with small children, invalids or pets. We also use them to store and carry items. (For example, most of the food donated by individuals to food banks for the poor is in plastic bags.)
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | July 19, 1992
When military production ended after World War II, American plastics manufacturers cashed in on their technology, using leftover materials to create something really explosive -- a fashion boom from Broadway to Burbank. Style-conscious women in the 1950s craved the "New Look" of heavy, hard-edged, and whimsically eccentric plastic pocketbooks, lugging around those clunkers for a decade until soft vinyl liberated them in the '60s.Thousands of passe plastic pocketbooks were sent to attics and Goodwill stores across America and are re-emerging now as collectibles.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | August 3, 2007
I recently bought three bottles of water, which the cashier promptly placed in a plastic bag, doubling it for good measure. In a single transaction, I became environmental enemy No. 1. In the ever-growing list of things you must do to save the planet, eschewing plastic -- whether as a bag or a bottle for water -- is having its moment. Cities like Annapolis are seeking to ban plastic bags, convenient for hauling groceries home but often ending up littering the curb, floating up to become entangled in tree branches or landing in the bay, where they threaten marine life.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
Obviously Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the rest of Baltimore's city leaders have solved all of the serious issues facing the city of Baltimore, because tonight the Baltimore City Council is going to be once again taking up the idea of a 10-cent tax on plastic bags in the city of Baltimore. There are of course several very good reasons why this is a very bad idea: Taxes or outright bans of plastic bags don't save cities any money on litter collection. A 2013 study of such bans and taxes by the National Center for Policy Analysis "shows no evidence of a reduction in costs attributable to reduced use of plastic bags" when it comes to litter collection in city budgets.  When compared to other forms of litter, plastic bags constitute a very small portion of our litter problem, a point which has been made both by researchers and by anecdotal evidence here in Baltimore.
NEWS
January 26, 2014
Call it what you like, the proposal to charge 10-cents for plastic bags is a tax on the people of Baltimore ( "Shoppers in city may see 10-cent bag fee," Jan 21). As for Councilman Brandon Scott's comment, "This is a good step for us to be a sustainable city moving forward," how are we going to accomplish this by charging 10 cents a bag? If you are serious about this, councilman, then flat out ban the bags. Oh, wait a minute, if you do that, the city loses $1.5 million, half of which goes into the mysterious "General Fund.
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