Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPlasma
IN THE NEWS

Plasma

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | February 7, 2008
About a year ago, I bought a 42-inch plasma TV. One night I went to bed without turning off the TV. I had been watching a movie on DVD, and now there is a blemish midscreen that, when at its most noticeable, shows the words "PRESS PLAY TO RESUME" in flickering chartreuse. I wrote to the manufacturer and was told to reset the TV to original specifications. I did and it's a little better, but the blemish is still there. I didn't think burning was a negative feature with plasma, but it seems at this point to be undeniable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Injured Orioles catcher Matt Wieters had a platelet-rich plasma injection in his strained right elbow last Monday in hopes of accelerating his recovery. “Thought it could only help speed up the healing,” said Wieters, who is not scheduled for any more PRP injections at this time. Wieters, who has been on the 15-day disabled list since May 11, has no set timetable for his return. Because the discomfort only occurs when he throws, the plan was for Wieters to rest the elbow for at least two weeks before attempting to throw again.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2003
The torch of plasma, or superheated atmospheric gas, that investigators believe brought down the shuttle Columbia might have been leaving the craft's wheel well, not entering it, having cut a channel of destruction all the way from the leading edge of the wing near the fuselage, officials involved with the inquiry said yesterday. The new theory of the loss of the shuttle is gaining prominence on the board led by Adm. Harold W. Gehman Jr., but no single theory has emerged as a clear leader yet, one official said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Multiple myeloma is cancer of the bone marrow, an incurable type of the disease that kills about 10,700 people a year. But for the 22,000 diagnosed annually, including recently Tom Brokaw, former NBC news anchor, there are new options for treatment and more kinds of therapies in the works, according to Dr. Gary I. Cohen, medical director of the Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He answers questions about the disease. What is multiple myeloma?
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1997
It's the battlefield of the near future, and some despotic goon has just launched cruise missiles filled with anthrax at an American air base.Cleanup troops arrive with gear straight out of the "Ghostbusters" movies -- backpacks with long wands that emit a strange blue glow. Walking amid contaminated Humvees and toilet seats that could dissolve human organs, the troops wave the wands over the objects. In moments, the objects are germ-free.Environmental Elements Corp. of Baltimore has won an Air Force contract to try to make that eerie cleanup possible.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1996
My older brother was recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma. His several courses of treatment have been accompanied by blood tests, which are said to determine whether the treatments are working.I would like to know how these blood tests work, and if I should get these tests in case the disease runs in families.Multiple myeloma (or just myeloma) is an uncontrolled, malignant proliferation of plasma cells (blood cells that produce antibodies to protect against infections). The cancer results from the proliferation of exact copies of a single plasma cell, which secrete large quantities of an abnormal antibody into the blood.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2003
CHICAGO - Baxter International Inc., noting a worsening competitive squeeze on profits at a key blood-products group, disclosed plans yesterday to eliminate 2,500 jobs - about 5 percent of the Deerfield, Ill., company's work force - and warned investors that full-year earnings will fall short of its earlier guidance. The medical products giant said costs associated with the retrenchment, which includes the pending closure of more than a score of plasma-collection facilities and a company-wide work force streamlining, will burden second-quarter net earnings with a hefty $200 million after-tax charge.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2000
Scientists working in Europe claimed yesterday to have achieved a key goal of modern physics, the re-creation of a form of matter that briefly filled the universe 10 millionths of a second after its birth. Other physicists questioned the announcement, saying they want to see more evidence. "My initial reaction is somewhere between skepticism and doubt," said Thomas Cohen, a nuclear physicist at the University of Maryland. The European Laboratory for Particle Physics, called CERN, said in a news release that one of its teams had found "compelling evidence" that it had created a quark-gluon plasma, a hot soup of what are believed to be the fundamental constituents of matter.
SPORTS
November 23, 2007
A weekly look at a fun place to catch a Ravens game: Viewing pleasure: Eight plasma TVs ranging from 20 inches to 36 inches Porters Pub 1032 Riverside Ave., Baltimore Best seat in the house: Any booth with a TV above it. Crowd: Ravens fans are most prevalent, but the crowd is mixed. Pre-game meal: There are food and drink specials every Sunday based on what stock is available. On the wall: Old and historic photos of Federal Hill. Phone: 410-539-1999 Web site: portersfederalhill.
FEATURES
By Jordan Rane and Jordan Rane,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2007
Venture into a home-entertainment store to shop for a new flat-panel TV and very little seems clear beyond those ludicrously sharp, bright, oversized images of sweat beads on some jock's face or taste buds on a grasshopper's tongue. The sales staff, weary of explaining the difference between seemingly identical models - "They're all good. How big's your wall?" - doesn't illuminate much. Still, the reduced prices on the sets are very tempting. "I think most customers who come in are pretty bewildered right now," says Pam Crane, executive vice president of the Los Angeles area's Ken Crane home-entertainment stores.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Many patients taken to the University of Maryland's Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore cling to life, barely able to breathe, much less consent to participate in a medical trial, a reality that makes trauma research extremely difficult. With life-saving advances so hard to identify, researchers at Shock Trauma now hope to get around that problem — and answer one of trauma medicine's vexing questions — by declaring nearly everyone a potential test subject. The Baltimore hospital is one of 12 trauma centers around the country aiming to use a controversial bureaucratic tool to bypass individual consent and conduct the type of large-scale medical experiment that has proved elusive in the messy, life-and-death specialty of trauma care.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Did you make it up to the new Gino's? Or did you make it a point to stay as far away as possible from the corner of Joppa and LaSalle in Towson? I've been looking at Facebook commenting and the response seems mostly positive, with hour-long waits to place orders but reasonable waits for food. But apparently the lines shut down before the official closing time, which upset the people waiting in line. Some guy who said he helped to open TWO CHIPOTLES actually wrote "Shame, Shame!
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2008
Wende Zimmerman Project manager, Plasma Protein Therapeutics Association Professional organizer and owner, Saving Spaces Salary: $54,000 Age: 39 Years on the job: 6 How she got started: After working for the Humane Society of the United States for nine years as a project coordinator, she decided to change jobs and went to work full time for the Plasma Protein Therapeutics Association (PPTA), based in Annapolis. Always being interested in organization, Zimmerman also started attending meetings of the Maryland Association of Professional Organizers.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | February 7, 2008
About a year ago, I bought a 42-inch plasma TV. One night I went to bed without turning off the TV. I had been watching a movie on DVD, and now there is a blemish midscreen that, when at its most noticeable, shows the words "PRESS PLAY TO RESUME" in flickering chartreuse. I wrote to the manufacturer and was told to reset the TV to original specifications. I did and it's a little better, but the blemish is still there. I didn't think burning was a negative feature with plasma, but it seems at this point to be undeniable.
SPORTS
December 14, 2007
A weekly look at a fun place to catch a Ravens game: The Playbook 6700 German Hill Road, Baltimore Viewing pleasure: More than 20 42-inch high-definition plasma TVs line the walls of the spacious dining area with several more plasmas behind the bar. Best seat: Any of the cocktail tables in the middle of the room will allow you to watch several games at once, as will any seat at the bar. Crowd: Ravens fans of all ages. Pre-game meal: Ribs. Full rack, St. Louis-style with two sides, $10.99.
BUSINESS
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,Los Angeles Times | November 3, 2007
William Wang likes being disruptive, and television shoppers are paying the price - a lower price. In 2002, when plasma TVs were selling for $10,000, the Taiwanese-born entrepreneur set out to sell one for $2,999. He fulfilled his ambition a year later, shipping a 46-inch model with a $2,799 price tag, about half what other brands then charged. Now his Irvine, Calif., company, Vizio Inc., is the No. 1 maker of flat-panel TVs in North America, outselling entrenched Asian competitors in the second quarter.
BUSINESS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 23, 2004
CHICAGO - Baxter International Inc. disclosed plans yesterday to eliminate up to 4,000 jobs - nearly 8 percent of the company's work force - as the next phase of an extensive restructuring that the struggling global health-care company hopes will strengthen its profit margins. The Deerfield, Ill.-based maker of medical products announced the latest retrenchment nine months after it began cutting 3,000 jobs. Half of the 4,000 additional job cuts will be borne by U.S. workers. Baxter is cutting back in a turbulent period marked by investor dismay over a series of quarterly earnings disappointments.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,Atlanta Journal-Constitution | July 12, 2007
I have now read your last two columns on Windows Vista and continue to have a relevant question. What are the benefits of migrating to Vista, other than helping Microsoft make money? As a computer user, what will I gain? I understand Vista has fancier icons. I don't know how I lived without them all these years. - Michael Schmidt, Colorado Springs, Colo. Let's start with a given: You will probably move to Vista sooner or later - no matter whether Vista is a significant upgrade or not. Microsoft will eventually drop XP support, and new programs will be written with Vista in mind.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.