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NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
Some signs of summer in Baltimore: Crab houses are open, snowball ice machines are churning and the red chairs are back in the 2100 block of W. Fayette St.About a generation ago, residents along the block began the summertime tradition of placing two freshly painted bright red metal lawn chairs and color-coordinated tire planters brimming with flowers outside every rowhouse on the block tucked away in Southwest Baltimore.The tradition began as part of the Afro-American newspaper's Clean Block competition.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 2, 2012
For some banks, green is more than just money.  PNC is wearing its commitment to green building on the exterior of its new Maryland headquarters downtown. The bank recently put the finishing touches on a massive "living wall" at One East Pratt Street. Measuring 84 feet tall by 24 feet wide, the wall is made up of 504 vertical planters filled with a variety of ground-cover plants, including phlox, euonymus and pachysandra, all arranged to form the image of a tree with the PNC logo at its base.  At 2,016 square feet, it's slightly smaller than the one gracing PNC's corporate headquarters in Pittsburgh.
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FEATURES
January 17, 2008
Jan. 17 1893 Hawaii's monarchy was overthrown as a group of businessmen and sugar planters forced Queen Liliuokalani to abdicate. 1917 The United States paid Denmark $25 million for the Virgin Islands.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to the Sun | June 7, 2008
All my new basil plants have dead patches on the leaves. Can I treat this? If the patches are tan, it may be damage from the cold weather. Basil likes it hot. It should recover and put out healthy new growth when temperatures rise. If the patches are dark brown or blackish, it's probably a fungus. There are no fungal sprays that would be appropriate for fungal disease on basil because it is a food plant. Consider replanting. My neighbor has a new lawn, and it is a lot greener than mine.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | July 4, 1993
Q: I've been collecting Planters Peanut memorabilia for several years and was wondering if there are any collectors' clubs.A: Collectors can join Peanut Pals if they go nuts over Mr. Peanut, the Planters logo of a top-hatted monocled peanut figure with a cane, designed in 1916 by a 14-year old Virginia schoolboy responding to a corporate contest. Annual dues, $20, include a bi-monthly newsletter and an invitation to the group's annual gathering, this year scheduled for July 7-11 in Winchester, Va. For more information about "Peanut Pals," contact its president, Joe Stivaletti, 425 East 78th St., New York, N.Y. 10021, (212)
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
Thanks to the efforts of dedicated volunteers, riders will be able to take a load off while they wait for trains at the new light rail station in Glen Burnie.Before a group of community representatives called the Station Enhancement Committee got into the act, riders would have been left standing around waiting for trains, said committee chairwoman Katherine DeGrange. The Mass Transit Administration, which designed the new station, hadn't planned to provide benches.Committee members thought the lack of seating was an obvious shortcoming.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | June 30, 2002
Q. We would like to build wood planters around the trees in the pits of our sidewalk. Will the planters cause any problems for the trees? A. This is an excellent question. Most tree experts are aghast when they see mulch or soil mounded up around the trunks of trees. The mounded material can smother young trees and in some cases will lead to the damage of tree crowns. I am concerned that building planters around trees may cause some of the same problems. In addition, low planters can be hazardous.
NEWS
By BRAIN SULLAM | July 23, 1995
Just before the temperatures really got hot two weeks ago, I noticed a squirrel lying prostrate on my front lawn.Thinking it was dead, I strolled up to the little animal.As I got within about 10 feet of it, the squirrel looked up, gave a quick shake of its tail and sprinted for the nearest tree.Since that morning, I have noticed several other squirrels doing the same thing.Last week, I really began to sympathize with those little critters. The extraordinary heat was driving me crazy, too. I began entertaining strange thoughts -- like wishing it were winter.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 16, 1996
Having given up on the Mass Transit Administration, hard core football fan Anna Lybrook will get to tomorrow night's Ravens game the old, reliable way -- she'll take a bus from a bar with a bunch of guys. When the Colts were in town, Lybrook used to hop the big wheels at Port City Pub in East Baltimore. That was the best way to get to Memorial Stadium in time for kickoff.Why isn't Lybrook going MTA anymore? Two weeks ago, for the Ravens exhibition opener, she and her husband, Donald, decided to leave their car at an Arbutus park-and-ride lot and take the bus to 33rd Street.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1995
QUEENSTOWN -- When Israeli and Syrian negotiators sit down today at the Wye River Conference Center, they will be secluded in the tranquillity of nature.The wind moves through the bare trees; birds chitter. There is an occasional squawk from a duck taking wing over the tree line. The Wye River's icy-bright water is separated from the land by a thin, pristine line of snow.It is territory unlike the landscape of the Middle East. That is what the State Department wanted, a tranquillity that could become a silent partner at the negotiating table.
FEATURES
January 17, 2008
Jan. 17 1893 Hawaii's monarchy was overthrown as a group of businessmen and sugar planters forced Queen Liliuokalani to abdicate. 1917 The United States paid Denmark $25 million for the Virgin Islands.
BUSINESS
By Stephen J. Hedges and Stephen J. Hedges,Chicago Tribune | January 2, 2008
WASHINGTON -- While the federal government doesn't usually endorse products, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has struck an unusual arrangement with agribusiness giant Monsanto Co. that gives farmers in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa and Minnesota a break on federal crop insurance premiums if they plant Monsanto-brand seed corn this spring. The arrangement has raised some eyebrows, particularly among organic farm groups that argue the government agency should not be promoting Monsanto seed corn that contains chemicals that kill weeds and insects.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | April 10, 2007
The stems on the daffodils are frozen. The magnolias have gone back into the greenhouse. Farmers are covering their peas and cabbages, while winery and orchard owners are praying the mercury doesn't dip further. April is often the cruelest month for those who work the soil, and this spring has been especially brutal, with yesterday's low of 26 degrees at BWI Marshall Airport setting a record. The cold has forced farmers and gardeners to scramble to protect their crops. Many said yesterday that their precautions have worked so far - though they still could lose everything if the cold nights continue.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2006
Not only was it a dark and stormy night -- it was muggy, too. But that didn't stop the recently formed Friends of Back Creek Park from going to work. Members of the nonprofit organization met for several hours Wednesday night during intermittent thunderstorms to plant native grasses in the small Back Creek Park in Annapolis. "We had nine hearty souls dancing around the lightning bolts," said Mel Wilkins, a group member. The grasses, planted along the shoreline that the group had recently rehabilitated, will serve several purposes: They will be food for ducks and a place for fish to lay eggs, and they will prevent erosion, Wilkins said.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | February 16, 2005
On Presidents Day we're supposed to remember those great men who have led our country through the centuries. But, really, how much could they have accomplished on an empty stomach? So on Monday, let us also remember the culinary contributions of the first ladies, who not only kept their men fed, but in some cases, had a great deal of influence over what the nation ate as well. In 1961, when Jacqueline Kennedy hired French chef Rene Verdon, cooks all across America became fascinated by French cuisine.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | August 25, 2004
CHARLESTON, S.C. -- Growing up in Baltimore County, William Barclay Hall so detested school that at 16 he secretly signed up to join the Navy. He would have gone, he says, but his father refused to sign the permission form. Instead, the senior Hall, a tea taster at McCormick & Co., agreed to allow his son to quit Dulaney High School on the condition that he try to make something of himself. He helped his son get a job at a tea factory in Toronto. A year later, the 17-year-old Hall was enrolled as a tea apprentice in London, tasting between 800 and 1,000 cups of tea a day. "I would have done anything to get out of high school," Hall says.
NEWS
November 23, 2001
Green Party thrives without money from PACs or corporations I was happy to see coverage in The Sun of the Green Party winning status as a national committee ("FEC awards Green Party national committee status," Nov. 9). But while the article was technically accurate, it missed an important point about the Green Party: We do politics differently than Democrats and Republicans, especially with regard to money. Although national committee status allows us to accept donations of up to $20,000 per year from individual donors, the Green Party of the United States caps donations at $10,000.
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt | February 26, 1992
There never seems to be enough hours in the day.We rush the children off to school, hurry through work and then zip off to the improvement association meeting, the Cub Scout Blue and Gold Banquet, or head over to the mall to explain to errant shoppers that white shoes should be worn only after Memorial Day.OK, so maybe some of us have more free time than others.But thanks to leap year we get not just a few extra minutes or an hour, but an entire day! And on a weekend!So what do we do this Saturday with this precious gift from the Hallmark calendar people?
NEWS
February 4, 2004
On January 30, 2004 LONZETTAVisitation at 2140 N. Fulton Avenue, on Wednesday 2 to 8 P.M. The family will receive friends in the chapel, on Thursday at 10:30 A.M. Funeral 11 A.M.
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