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Plantar Fasciitis

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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Reporter | July 19, 2007
So you spring out of bed, eager to meet the day, but a sharp pain -- which seems to shoot straight into your heel -- stops you in midstride. Ouch. It's enough to make anyone want to go straight back to bed. According to Dr. Stuart Miller, a foot and ankle orthopedic sub-specialist at Union Memorial Hospital, the diagnosis could be plantar fasciitis -- an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a band of tissue that extends along the bottom of the foot from...
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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 9, 2009
At the first of the year, many people resolve to get in shape. A month or two later, many of those same people who jumped full throttle into an exercise regimen are feeling the effects of running, walking and other new activities - particularly in their feet. But there are ways to treat and prevent foot pain, says Dr. Rebecca A. Cerrato, a foot and ankle surgeon at the Institute for Foot and Ankle Reconstruction at Mercy Medical Center. Do you see more foot injuries this time of year? We'll often see right after the New Year foot-related issues from people getting back to the gym. There's usually a little spike in January and February.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 30, 2002
MY FELLOW MOTHERS and I are walking these days like a bunch of fellow grandmothers. It is a kind of limp accompanied by a facial expression that is equal parts flinch and exasperation. Our feet hurt from the minute we step out of bed in the morning, and, frankly, we don't have time for this. According to the sports medicine doctors and orthopedists who usually treat our pampered child athletes, we are all suffering from plantar fasciitis, a fancy name for what happens when you are on your feet all day. "Good luck," says Stephen Baitch, a physical therapist with Union Memorial Hospital's sports medicine clinic.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Reporter | July 19, 2007
So you spring out of bed, eager to meet the day, but a sharp pain -- which seems to shoot straight into your heel -- stops you in midstride. Ouch. It's enough to make anyone want to go straight back to bed. According to Dr. Stuart Miller, a foot and ankle orthopedic sub-specialist at Union Memorial Hospital, the diagnosis could be plantar fasciitis -- an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a band of tissue that extends along the bottom of the foot from...
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2005
I've been hearing a lot about nutrition therapists. What exactly do they do? A nutrition therapist, unlike a traditional registered dietitian, counsels his or her clients on their emotional relationships with food (as opposed to the classic diet-based approach). While a registered dietitian might suggest alternatives to that extra dessert you crave each night, a nutrition therapist may trace that desire back to the deprivation you felt from never being allowed dessert as a child. He or she would then work with you to straighten out those emotional issues.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 9, 2009
At the first of the year, many people resolve to get in shape. A month or two later, many of those same people who jumped full throttle into an exercise regimen are feeling the effects of running, walking and other new activities - particularly in their feet. But there are ways to treat and prevent foot pain, says Dr. Rebecca A. Cerrato, a foot and ankle surgeon at the Institute for Foot and Ankle Reconstruction at Mercy Medical Center. Do you see more foot injuries this time of year? We'll often see right after the New Year foot-related issues from people getting back to the gym. There's usually a little spike in January and February.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
Ashburn, Va. -- Washington Redskins coach Joe Gibbs said he erred in his criticism of officials and instant replay after the team's 36-35 loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday. Gibbs, who vented on Monday, was particularly incensed that officials did not overturn Mike Alstott's game-winning, two-point conversion with 58 seconds left and would not allow him to challenge a ruling on Joey Galloway's 34-yard catch that led to Tampa Bay's first touchdown. "If we disagree on something, I should just say, `Hey, we're going to turn it in, and see where we go,'" Gibbs said yesterday after practice at Redskins Park.
NEWS
By Jeannine Stein and Jeannine Stein,Los Angeles Times | January 19, 2007
From the pickup basketball player to the motivated marathoner, all who exercise can suffer the agony of the feet. Here are the most common injuries: Plantar fasciitis Any activity that involves jumping, plus sudden stops and starts, can lead to plantar fasciitis. This overstretching of the ligament that runs from the heel to the ball of the foot, straight through the arch, affects about 14 percent of men and women ages 18 to 60, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association.
NEWS
By Lisa Roberts and Lisa Roberts,Orlando Sentinal | October 27, 2006
The shoe fits, but Brett Williams decided not to wear it. After his new running shoes caused sore knees, the 29-year-old Salt Lake City man went au naturel. In June, he ran barefoot in his first marathon. His feat, if you will, created national buzz when a photo of his road-blackened soles appeared in The Wall Street Journal. Barefoot running has been the practice of some of the world's best runners, including Abebe Bikila of Ethiopia, who won the 1960 Olympics marathon without shoes. And though most of the world's runners continue to lace up, barefoot ideology might be hitting its stride.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2006
My husband, a runner, has been sidelined by plantar fasciitis. What's the best way for him to stay in shape? Ouch. This question hurts. Plantar fasciitis is an injury to the thick band of tissue that stretches from your heel to your toes on the bottom of your foot. Sometimes the tissue tears. Other times, it ruptures, causing serious arch problems. Runners dread this common injury, in part because it usually means you have to stop running for at least a couple weeks. To some, that's akin to doing time in the Big House.
NEWS
By Jeannine Stein and Jeannine Stein,Los Angeles Times | January 19, 2007
From the pickup basketball player to the motivated marathoner, all who exercise can suffer the agony of the feet. Here are the most common injuries: Plantar fasciitis Any activity that involves jumping, plus sudden stops and starts, can lead to plantar fasciitis. This overstretching of the ligament that runs from the heel to the ball of the foot, straight through the arch, affects about 14 percent of men and women ages 18 to 60, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association.
NEWS
By Lisa Roberts and Lisa Roberts,Orlando Sentinal | October 27, 2006
The shoe fits, but Brett Williams decided not to wear it. After his new running shoes caused sore knees, the 29-year-old Salt Lake City man went au naturel. In June, he ran barefoot in his first marathon. His feat, if you will, created national buzz when a photo of his road-blackened soles appeared in The Wall Street Journal. Barefoot running has been the practice of some of the world's best runners, including Abebe Bikila of Ethiopia, who won the 1960 Olympics marathon without shoes. And though most of the world's runners continue to lace up, barefoot ideology might be hitting its stride.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2006
My husband, a runner, has been sidelined by plantar fasciitis. What's the best way for him to stay in shape? Ouch. This question hurts. Plantar fasciitis is an injury to the thick band of tissue that stretches from your heel to your toes on the bottom of your foot. Sometimes the tissue tears. Other times, it ruptures, causing serious arch problems. Runners dread this common injury, in part because it usually means you have to stop running for at least a couple weeks. To some, that's akin to doing time in the Big House.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
Ashburn, Va. -- Washington Redskins coach Joe Gibbs said he erred in his criticism of officials and instant replay after the team's 36-35 loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday. Gibbs, who vented on Monday, was particularly incensed that officials did not overturn Mike Alstott's game-winning, two-point conversion with 58 seconds left and would not allow him to challenge a ruling on Joey Galloway's 34-yard catch that led to Tampa Bay's first touchdown. "If we disagree on something, I should just say, `Hey, we're going to turn it in, and see where we go,'" Gibbs said yesterday after practice at Redskins Park.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2005
A once-promising rookie season has evolved into an uncertain sophomore one for Devard Darling. In a matter of nine months, the Ravens' 2004 third-round draft pick has bounced from a starter in the team's preseason opener to a receiver unsure where he stands on the depth chart. That's what happens when a team aggressively revamps its receiving corps by signing Derrick Mason on the first day of free agency and drafting Mark Clayton in the first round. When the Ravens began their second passing camp yesterday, Darling said he intended to show the coaches that he has recovered fully from a season-ending heel injury and still can become the playmaker that the team envisioned last season.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2005
I usually run three or more times a week - not far - maybe two or three miles. I am 74 years old and have been running since I was 45. This winter, I developed left heel pain to the point that I couldn't run or even walk comfortably. The podiatrist gave me a cortisone shot in the heel and said I have a heel spur. She showed me an X-ray of a bone protrusion. The expensive customized shoe insert she gave me was not effective. I need to exercise and would like to resume running. Do I need an operation?
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2005
A once-promising rookie season has evolved into an uncertain sophomore one for Devard Darling. In a matter of nine months, the Ravens' 2004 third-round draft pick has bounced from a starter in the team's preseason opener to a receiver unsure where he stands on the depth chart. That's what happens when a team aggressively revamps its receiving corps by signing Derrick Mason on the first day of free agency and drafting Mark Clayton in the first round. When the Ravens began their second passing camp yesterday, Darling said he intended to show the coaches that he has recovered fully from a season-ending heel injury and still can become the playmaker that the team envisioned last season.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2005
I usually run three or more times a week - not far - maybe two or three miles. I am 74 years old and have been running since I was 45. This winter, I developed left heel pain to the point that I couldn't run or even walk comfortably. The podiatrist gave me a cortisone shot in the heel and said I have a heel spur. She showed me an X-ray of a bone protrusion. The expensive customized shoe insert she gave me was not effective. I need to exercise and would like to resume running. Do I need an operation?
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2005
I've been hearing a lot about nutrition therapists. What exactly do they do? A nutrition therapist, unlike a traditional registered dietitian, counsels his or her clients on their emotional relationships with food (as opposed to the classic diet-based approach). While a registered dietitian might suggest alternatives to that extra dessert you crave each night, a nutrition therapist may trace that desire back to the deprivation you felt from never being allowed dessert as a child. He or she would then work with you to straighten out those emotional issues.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 30, 2002
MY FELLOW MOTHERS and I are walking these days like a bunch of fellow grandmothers. It is a kind of limp accompanied by a facial expression that is equal parts flinch and exasperation. Our feet hurt from the minute we step out of bed in the morning, and, frankly, we don't have time for this. According to the sports medicine doctors and orthopedists who usually treat our pampered child athletes, we are all suffering from plantar fasciitis, a fancy name for what happens when you are on your feet all day. "Good luck," says Stephen Baitch, a physical therapist with Union Memorial Hospital's sports medicine clinic.
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