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By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | August 7, 1991
Jo Ann M. Nuetzel, one of Recipe Finder's regular contributors, found these simple plantain recipes for Ruth Schultz. Thanks again, Jo Ann!Plantains are ripe when the skin is black.Curried PlantainsPlantainsFlourCurry powderCinnamonButterPeel, slice and roll plantains in flour that's had a little curry powder and or cinnamon added; saute in butter ununtil golden.Fried PlantainsPlantainsBisquickOil for deep fryingDip ripe chunks of plantain in Bisquick batter and deep fry in oil ununtil golden brown.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 12, 2013
Cuban Revolution has come to Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood. Just a few blocks away from the Johns Hopkins Hospital , the Middle East area has seldom officered any reason for outsiders to wander in. That is changing. The neighborhood is being developed as a mixed-use life science campus. The anchor tenant is the Science & Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, but the 80-acre area will include other research facilities along with new housing, parking and a six-acre central park.
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FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen | August 21, 1991
To the untrained eye, a plantain could be easily mistaken for a banana. But woe betide the unsuspecting eater who slices one onto his corn flakes. Banana-scented and banana-shaped, the plantain (accent on the first syllable) is inedible in its raw state. But fry or boil it and it becomes an epicure's morsel.Plantains are eaten at every stage of ripeness. When green ("platano verde" in Spanish), they are starchy and bland (like potatoes) and can be fried, boiled or mashed. Semi-ripe plantains (called "pinturados" -- "painted ones")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
A handful of new food trucks are circling Baltimore's streets. We're catching up with them in advance of A Taste of Two Cities , the big June 23 Baltimore vs. D.C. food truck rally. Although Karlita's Latin and American Mobile Cuisine has been on the streets since last September, We're only just heard about it recently, when its operator, Karla Flores rang us up. A native of Honduras, Flores also sells things quesadillas, taquitos, burritos, fried plantains and tacos -- Latin food with an authentic Honduran flair, Flores calls it. A former city employee, Karla Flores left her job in the mayor's office last year to launch.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 5, 2009
The other day I attempted to eat like a Nigerian. I had a serving of jollof rice, red rice flavored with a sauce made of tomatoes, spices and chili peppers. It was topped, initially, with some piece of boiled beef. Later I replaced the beef with goat meat, a piece that still had the skin on. "People who know about meat, always go for the goat," said Bamidelle Ogundele, better known as Lady D, the owner and chief chef of Lady D's Cafe at 2637 Greenmount Ave. Ogundele was giving me a quick tutorial in the cuisine of her native country, Nigeria.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
Every once in a while, you come across a restaurant that has distinctive, well-prepared food at sensible prices. Havana Road in Towson is such a spot; it is a find. Situated in a storefront in on Pennsylvania Avenue in downtown Towson, Havana Road is small — about 30 seats — and serves only Cuban fare. But what it does with a limited menu, it does exceptionally well. Take, for example, the hummus trio ($6), an offering of black bean hummus, red hummus made with sun-dried tomatoes and hummus made with Cuban spices.
FEATURES
By L. D. Buckner | May 8, 1993
Nyammin's Karibi Kafe332 N. Charles St. Hours: Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. to midnight, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday. (410) 783-1533.There are days when one more hamburger or turkey sandwich is enough to push a bored palate over the edge, days when you can't be sure how many pencils you've eaten before realizing they aren't french fries. These are the days for Nyammin's Karibi Kafe.Asterisks on Nyammin's neon-green or orange takeout menus warn upfront that some selections are "Hot and Spicy."
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | January 20, 1999
Lemon, raisins and sugar. This tasty combination in a cookie was the request of Lucy W. Merrill of Baltimore. She wrote: "I am looking for Lemon-Raisin Sugar Cookies. The cookie I remember was a pale drop cookie flattened with a glass dipped in sugar. The dough contained lemon juice or extract, enough to make it very lemony, and, of course, raisins. I have improvised with disappointing results."Her response came from Anne Heinrichs of Relay, who wrote: "This sounds like the recipe Lucy Merrill is looking for. My mom used to make these around Christmas and there were never enough left for company when we kids found where she hid them."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2001
IF YOU haven't been to Upper Fells Point lately, you might be surprised to discover that the dominant influence now is Hispanic. Signs for the restaurants, markets, stores and Pentecostal churches in a three-block stretch of South Broadway are in Spanish, reflecting a customer base that's mainly from Central America and the Caribbean. The Latino feel of the enclave flies in the face of the most recent U.S. Census figures, which say that Baltimore's Hispanic population increased in the last decade to 11,061 in 2000 from 1990's 7,602.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 2004
The Peruvian charcoal-broiled chicken trend is wending its way from Washington to Baltimore. Chicken Rico, recently expanded from three D.C.-area locations to a fourth in Highlandtown, sets a high standard for the genre. Chicken Rico has a sunny atmosphere, enhanced by tapestries depicting life and landscapes in Peru, as well as traditional Peruvian flutes arranged on the wall. Artificial flowers decorate each table and music in Spanish blares from the speakers. Inca Kola shares space with Pepsi in the soda case.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
The dish: Curry Chicken meal Chains that adopt Jamaican recipes because they're popular rarely offer more than blackened this or jerked that. The kitchen sends out a burnt offering and covers its tracks with heat. The curried chicken ($9.55) at Golden Krust Caribbean Bakery and Grill, a chain with locations throughout the northeast, achieves the tantalizing heat hues and spice spectrum of Jamaican dishes without burning a thing. It's like they know and love what they're doing in the Caribbean kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
Every once in a while, you come across a restaurant that has distinctive, well-prepared food at sensible prices. Havana Road in Towson is such a spot; it is a find. Situated in a storefront in on Pennsylvania Avenue in downtown Towson, Havana Road is small — about 30 seats — and serves only Cuban fare. But what it does with a limited menu, it does exceptionally well. Take, for example, the hummus trio ($6), an offering of black bean hummus, red hummus made with sun-dried tomatoes and hummus made with Cuban spices.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2009
Cuba de Ayer is the wonderful creation of Jessica Rodriguez, who thought so highly of her mother-in-law's home-style Cuban cooking that she decided to open a restaurant. Her mother-in-law, Mayra Lopez, from Camaguey in Cuba, was, I assume, first flattered and later surprised when this actually happened. Cuba de Ayer graciously serves moderately priced, wholesome, and very tasty food in cheerfully attractive and well-managed surroundings. It's the kind of suburban restaurant that is packed with merry regulars on a Sunday night, the kind of place that people discover by word of mouth and stay loyal to for years.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2009
When it first opened back in 2006, I visited and enjoyed myself at Carlos O'Charlies. I remember being impressed first of all with how big the place was: two floors of shifting environments, several bars and multiple dining areas. Downstairs, there was a dance floor and a few pool tables; upstairs, more formal dining spaces; and in the center, a stone fountain. It didn't all make perfect sense, and it was hard to imagine its ever being full of diners, but its flamboyance put a smile on your face.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 5, 2009
The other day I attempted to eat like a Nigerian. I had a serving of jollof rice, red rice flavored with a sauce made of tomatoes, spices and chili peppers. It was topped, initially, with some piece of boiled beef. Later I replaced the beef with goat meat, a piece that still had the skin on. "People who know about meat, always go for the goat," said Bamidelle Ogundele, better known as Lady D, the owner and chief chef of Lady D's Cafe at 2637 Greenmount Ave. Ogundele was giving me a quick tutorial in the cuisine of her native country, Nigeria.
SPORTS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | January 3, 2009
What Baltimore's Italia lacks in size, it makes up for in red sauce-steeped charm - just like mama used to make. After bowls of pasta at Amicci's or Da Mimmo's or Aldo's or Sabatino's - all various Italian terms that roughly translate to "entrees that cost more than you think they should" - couples could stroll the crisscross of short streets in minutes, but instead take a more circuitous path, licking heaping gelato cones from Vaccaro's and stopping to...
SPORTS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | January 3, 2009
What Baltimore's Italia lacks in size, it makes up for in red sauce-steeped charm - just like mama used to make. After bowls of pasta at Amicci's or Da Mimmo's or Aldo's or Sabatino's - all various Italian terms that roughly translate to "entrees that cost more than you think they should" - couples could stroll the crisscross of short streets in minutes, but instead take a more circuitous path, licking heaping gelato cones from Vaccaro's and stopping to...
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2009
When it first opened back in 2006, I visited and enjoyed myself at Carlos O'Charlies. I remember being impressed first of all with how big the place was: two floors of shifting environments, several bars and multiple dining areas. Downstairs, there was a dance floor and a few pool tables; upstairs, more formal dining spaces; and in the center, a stone fountain. It didn't all make perfect sense, and it was hard to imagine its ever being full of diners, but its flamboyance put a smile on your face.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2006
Aquarelas Brazilian Restaurant 1622 Eastern Ave., Baltimore -- 410-276-6012 Hours --10 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sundays BEST BITE Our favorite dish was the feijoada, $8.40, a traditional meal of black beans, pork, white rice, dried meat and chopped green vegetables. The surprisingly soft chunks of pork came in a side container mixed with hearty black beans. For us, the only drawback was the occasional bone in the pork, which came as a surprise. It would have been nice if the menu or server had warned us in advance.
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