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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
Financially struggling Blind Industries and Services of Maryland has laid off all 50 of its paper plant workers in Baltimore, an organization official confirmed yesterday.Ken Harper, chief financial officer for the not-for-profit organization, said the paper pad-making machines were shut down Friday because there were no more government orders for the pads.He said he hopes to receive another order within two weeks so that workers can return to their jobs by the middle of the month.This was the third major layoff in the last six months for the Baltimore-based organization, which is dedicated to employing and training blind Marylanders.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Federal workers' unions and food safety groups have joined to oppose new rules proposed by the Department of Agriculture to streamline federal poultry inspections. The USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service says the rules would "modernize" inspections of young chickens and turkeys, saving money for businesses and taxpayers while allowing inspectors to focus on the areas of poultry production that pose the greatest risk to food safety. The new inspection system grew out of a pilot program that began in the 1990s under President Bill Clinton.
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Edward L. Heard Jr. and Liz Atwood and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff Ross Hetrick contributed to this article | June 25, 1991
Negotiations resumed today between union and management representatives at the General Motors Corp. plant on Broening Highway after workers walked off their jobs.Workers struck the plant yesterday, protesting what they say are unsafe working conditions caused by job cutbacks.Both sides said the walkout was "businesslike" and no incidents of sabotage or violence have been reported.Twenty-four workers picketed in front of the plant today. Most were willing to talk about the union side of the issue, with several declaring that an improved working environment is worth striking and waiting for.GM officials have refused to comment on the issues involved in the strike.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and John Rivera and Heather Dewar and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1998
Some workers in the Delmarva Peninsula's chicken processing plants say they are the region's forgotten workers -- exploited by their employers, unaided by doctors and lawyers, overlooked by their unions and afraid to speak out.But signs of a new outspokenness are appearing among the industry's mostly Latino work force. In the past year, workers in some Delaware plants have twice walked off the job -- once in April to protest the treatment of a badly injured worker, and again Friday to attend a rally in Washington to press for changes in U.S. immigration law.Under the leadership of an activist priest, plant workers recently joined forces with poultry farmers, churchgoers and environmentalists to form the Delmarva Poultry Justice Alliance.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1993
BMW in S.C. to pay $12 an hourBayerische Motoren Werke will pay its U.S. assembly plant workers a starting wage of $12 an hour, or at least $4 an hour less than what most assemblers earn at Detroit's top carmakers.Workers at BMW's U.S. plant now under construction near Spartanburg, S.C., will be given quarterly raises of 50 cents an hour until they reach a rate of $16 an hour in two years, a BMW spokesman said.The $400 million assembly plant, which will start up next year, will employ about 2,000 workers by the end of the decade.
NEWS
By Staff report | November 4, 1990
Wage proposals were unveiled at the bargaining table last week for Carroll school maintenance and plant workers and bus drivers.The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) has asked for a $200 across-the-board monthly raise for all workers represented by the union, which includes about 200 maintenance and plant workers and about 30 bus drivers and bus assistants.The county Board of Education has proposed a 3 percent salary increase for plant and maintenance workers and a 3 percent hourly increase for bus drivers and bus assistants.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1999
A group of current and former employees for Perdue Farms Inc. filed a lawsuit yesterday against the Maryland-based poultry producer, claiming that it did not fully pay them for time worked and cheated them out of retirement benefits.The seven plaintiffs, including an employee at Perdue's Showell plant, requested that the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Delaware be given class action status.If granted, the lawsuit could affect about 14,000 workers at 16 plants, according to Joseph Sellers, an attorney for the workers.
NEWS
December 14, 1990
George L. Holloway Jr., 75, a labor union activist for many years, died Saturday at Sinai Hospital after a heart attack.Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Howard Park United Methodist Church, 5020 Gwynn Oak Ave.Mr. Holloway, who lived on Howard Park Avenue, retired in 1980 from the international staff of the United Auto Workers, on which he had served since moving to Baltimore in 1963. He helped with contract negotiations and did other work for locals in Maryland, Delaware and Virginia.
EXPLORE
February 20, 2012
The Carroll County Sheriff's Office is reporting that a man is in serious condition after a workplace accident that occurred Monday at Lehigh Portland Cement near Union Bridge. According to the Sheriff's Office, just after 2 p.m. Feb. 20, deputies responded to the cement company site on Quaker Hill Road for reports of an injured man. The man, identified by the Sheriff's Office as Steve Fleming, 46, was reportedly repairing monitoring equipment under a conveyer belt when a skid loader backed over him. The man was taken to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where he was in serious condition as of Monday late afternoon, according to the sheriff's office.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
A Baltimore County man won an $814,500 judgment in Baltimore County Circuit Court after claiming he contracted a rare lung disease known as "popcorn lung" from breathing a chemical used to make food taste buttery. A jury awarded Brian Hallock $5.4 million last month from Polarome International Inc., a New Jersey-based chemical manufacturer and distributor. But a judge said Friday she would reduce the amount because Maryland has a cap on non-economic damages, Hallock's attorney confirmed Tuesday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
Thelma G. Reagan, who christened a Baltimore-built tank landing ship during World War II, died of kidney failure Saturday at her daughter's Riderwood home. The longtime Rosedale resident was 96. Born Thelma Conner in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, she completed the eighth grade at Hampstead Hill Elementary School. As a young woman, she worked at the Crosse & Blackwell fancy foods plant. She worked in the production of mayonnaise. She met her husband, John E. Reagan, a master machinist, at a dance in Patterson Park.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | November 9, 2008
They had known the end was coming, but suddenly it's a lot closer for Allan Parker and 250 fellow Cecil County residents who work at the Chrysler SUV plant in Newark, Del. Instead of shutting down the plant in late 2009 as scheduled, the reeling company announced last month that it will turn out the lights Dec. 17. "A real nice Christmas present," said Parker, 53, who started at the plant 28 years ago and lives in North East. "I can't imagine the timing being any worse." With the U.S. auto industry on its back, thousands of autoworkers across the country face losing their high-paying jobs in a grim economy.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Hanah Cho and Meredith Cohn and Hanah Cho,Sun reporters | August 3, 2007
Official word began trickling in by e-mail, fax and cell phone before dawn yesterday to workers on the early shift. By midday, one way or another, most all of the 2,100 or so hourly workers at the Sparrows Point steel mill had been told the name of the plant's newest owner - the fourth in four years. The specifics were few, but workers felt relief at knowing - after weeks of not knowing. Some heard good things about Chicago-based Esmark Inc. They heard top company executives were "real steel men," that management had good relations with labor, and that Esmark owns a finishing mill that could use the steel slabs made at Sparrows Point.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI and BORZOU DARAGAHI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 4, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Suspected Sunni Arab insurgents killed at least 19 electric power plant employees and poor Shiite Muslim laborers during a rampage in a rural, religiously mixed stretch of the country, officials said yesterday. A loose coalition of political leaders, meanwhile, pushed forward an attempt to derail the nomination of interim Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari to a full term. Kurds, Sunnis and a secular bloc led by former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi are trying to persuade the leading Shiite Muslim bloc to withdraw al-Jaafari's name.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 7, 1997
DETROIT -- The United Auto Workers union yesterday issued two more strike threats against General Motors Corp. parts plants, bringing to three the number of GM factories that could be shut by walkouts next week.The union is threatening to strike late Friday at Michigan's 970-worker Saginaw malleable iron foundry and a 2,350-worker metal stamping plant in Grand Rapids, Mich., if local contract talks aren't settled. The union has issued a similar deadline for late Thursday at a Milwaukee catalytic converter plant.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Federal workers' unions and food safety groups have joined to oppose new rules proposed by the Department of Agriculture to streamline federal poultry inspections. The USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service says the rules would "modernize" inspections of young chickens and turkeys, saving money for businesses and taxpayers while allowing inspectors to focus on the areas of poultry production that pose the greatest risk to food safety. The new inspection system grew out of a pilot program that began in the 1990s under President Bill Clinton.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 2005
DETROIT -Visteon Corp., the struggling auto-parts maker, won support yesterday from leaders of its largest union for a major overhaul plan, which would allow the company to shed a quarter of its work force and nearly all its plants in the United States. Under the agreement, Visteon's former parent, Ford Motor Co., would reabsorb about 17,700 Visteon workers and assume control of 15 plants, most of them in the Midwest. The agreement, which must be ratified by rank-and-file members of the United Auto Workers union, would let Ford sell most of those 15 plants and offer buyouts to as many as 5,000 current Visteon workers.
NEWS
July 11, 2003
Marvin W. Somers, a retired factory worker and former Scoutmaster in the Boy Scouts, died Monday at Washington County Hospital of injuries from a mo-ped accident in Hancock on Independence Day. He was 81. Born and raised in Martinsburg, W.Va., Mr. Somers served in World War II as an airplane and engine mechanic for the Army Air Forces. After the war, Mr. Somers moved to Baltimore and worked for 35 years mixing chemicals for the former Alcolac plant in Fairfield. After a heart attack forced him to retire, Mr. Somers constructed a motor and attached it to his bicycle, making it easier for him to ride up hills.
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