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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
City and state officials gave Esskay Inc. a plan yesterday intended to keep the meat packing operation in Baltimore, and officials said a decision on the operation's fate could be made in three to four weeks."
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Tim Wheeler | October 15, 2013
Baltimore's harbor may be too funky for swimming or fishing, but maybe a little gardening can help. Students from two city schools and some adult volunteers gathered at the National Aquarium Tuesday to "plant" some oysters in the Inner Harbor - not for eating but to try to improve the health of the ailing water body. "This is the first time anyone has tried planting this number of oysters in the Inner Harbor," said Adam Lindquist, coordinator of the Healthy Harbor campaign, an ambitious initiative aimed at making the Northwest and Middle branches of the Patapsco River swimmable and fishable by 2020.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
U.S. Can Corp., an Oak Brook, Ill., can manufacturer, is adding about 40 workers to its plant in southeast Baltimore County.The increase follows the closing of another factory in Philadelphia."
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Investigators identified Friday the employee killed at the Coca-Cola bottling plant in East Baltimore. Joshua Cunningham, a contract worker, died Wednesday when a trailer fell on him, officials said. The Chase resident was 28. The accident occurred about 10:30 a.m. in the 700 block of Kresson St., near East Monument Street and Pulaski Highway, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a fire spokesman. A jack that had been moved under the front of the trailer gave way, said police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1996
Just before dawn, Victor H. Wilborne will fall asleep as usual, awake at the accustomed time around noon and dress the same way, probably in blue jeans, a button-down shirt and work shoes. Only, he no longer has anywhere to go.The afternoon hours have become an unfamiliar urban ritual of sounds, people and police cars, and he thinks, "So this is what goes on?" And he knows, "I'm not supposed to be here, I'm supposed to be at work."Yet Mr. Wilborne is one of 2,600 General Motors workers in Baltimore and more than 100,000 nationwide who suddenly find themselves out of work.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it will lay off almost all of its 1,000 workers at an assembly plant in New Jersey early next year, news that comes on the heels of its announcement that it will close its van plant in Baltimore. The Linden, N.J., plant was the only one that produced the Chevrolet Blazer and GMC Jimmy, sport utility vehicles that GM introduced almost a decade ago and does not plan to continue making. Baltimore's Broening Highway factory makes the Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari vans, which date back 20 years and are also being phased out. The news reflects the continued pressure on U.S. carmakers to squeeze out efficiencies in an increasingly competitive market.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
In a double blow to Baltimore's Esskay heritage, Esskay Inc. said yesterday it was finally shutting its Baltimore plant, and would stop paying for its retirees' health benefits.Company spokesman Harry Grauling Jr. said financial difficulties Esskay's parent company, Smithfield Foods Inc., forced it to ,, take the money-saving steps.Although Mr. Grauling would only say that the actions would take place "soon," union officials said the company would cut off operations here by next month.The Smithfield, Va.-based ham producer will save $1 million a year by ending contributions to the health insurance plan for the company's 380 Esskay retirees who worked at the Baltimore plant, he said.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
After months of waiting, supporters of a new Esskay plant in Baltimore have been told they will have to wait until financial conditions improve for Esskay's parent company.David B. McLaughlin, a spokesman for Esskay, said Smithfield Foods Inc. officials have decided that "until economic conditions improve, the corporation won't make any capital expenditures.""For the time being, it puts the situation on hold," Mr. McLaughlin said. Besides a bad hog market, Smithfield has also had to contend with problems at a new plant in North Carolina, he said.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1992
Revenues for this Baltimore-based stainless-steel operation, which has a plant in Baltimore County, dropped more than 25 percent during the second quarter because of falling prices and sagging sales. The company also stopped making stainless steel sheet last year.However, the local plant's losses were reduced because of increases in productivity and efficiency, the company said."We are cautiously optimistic that our markets will improve later in the year as the economy continues it gradual recovery," President Robert C. Rubino said.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | February 10, 1993
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke will try to determine whether Smithfield Foods Inc. is serious about trying to keep its Esskay operation in Baltimore, or whether an announced delay in reaching a decision on a new plant amounts to a rejection of the plan."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
The Baltimore Ravens have a signed new a hot dog supplier — from Philly. Esskay is out, Dietz & Watson is in. Esskay, founded in Baltimore in 1858, has been serving dogs at Ravens concession stands since the stadium opened in 1998. But Philadelphia-based Dietz & Watson just landed the three-year contract. The concession change has brought as much attention to hot dogging as Ray Lewis' last pre-game introduction. By punting the perceived hometown frank, the Ravens risk inciting Baltimoreans to the point that they resemble their famously unruly counterparts in Philly.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | September 23, 2006
A huge World War II aircraft manufacturing plant in Baltimore County's Middle River community sold for $37.5 million yesterday after a three-month-long online auction that drew international attention. Local leaders were stunned by the price - it set a record for an online auction of U.S. General Services Administration property - and were eager to learn the identity of the anonymous buyer, known only as "believe1." The GSA expects to reveal who the winner is in seven to 10 days. The 1.9 million-square-foot main building, a former Glenn L. Martin aircraft plant listed on the Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties, sits on 50 acres on Eastern Boulevard.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | September 27, 2005
The Lesaffre Yeast Corp. plant in Baltimore, which employs about 120, is to close later this year, the union representing the plant's workers said yesterday. The plant, which manufactures Red Star Yeast, is tentatively set to close in late November, with the company agreeing to pay workers through the end of the year, said Ken Kelm, secretary-treasurer of Teamsters Local 311, the union representing the workers at the factory in Fort Holabird Industrial Park. Laura Collins, manager of human resources at Lesaffre's North American headquarters in Milwaukee, declined to comment on any specifics of the closing.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2005
General Motors, which closed its 70-year-old Baltimore manufacturing plant in May, expects to fast-track the sale of the 185-acre industrial property on the city's eastern fringe. Dozens of developers have expressed interest or toured the Broening Highway plant, and real estate sources expect at least a dozen groups to submit proposals to GM by Monday, a deadline set by the auto manufacturer. "This piece of property has gotten one of the highest levels of interest, from a developer standpoint, of any property we've put on the market recently," said John McDonald, a GM spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2005
When it closes next month, General Motors' assembly plant in Baltimore will take another local factory down with it. Tower Automotive Inc., a Michigan supplier of vehicle frames and similar components, said yesterday that it will close its small Harford County operation because the 25 workers there make frames for GM's doomed plant, where production will end May 13. Tower, which is restructuring after filing for bankruptcy protection, also said it...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it will lay off almost all of its 1,000 workers at an assembly plant in New Jersey early next year, news that comes on the heels of its announcement that it will close its van plant in Baltimore. The Linden, N.J., plant was the only one that produced the Chevrolet Blazer and GMC Jimmy, sport utility vehicles that GM introduced almost a decade ago and does not plan to continue making. Baltimore's Broening Highway factory makes the Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari vans, which date back 20 years and are also being phased out. The news reflects the continued pressure on U.S. carmakers to squeeze out efficiencies in an increasingly competitive market.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 29, 1993
Master labor contract talks covering workers at Bethlehem Steel Corp. plants at Sparrows Point and Burns Harbor, Ind., will begin June 8, the company and the union announced yesterday.The announcement came a day after the United Steelworkers of America reached a groundbreaking agreement with Inland Steel Industries Inc., which includes a no-layoffs clause and allows a union official to sit on the company's board.Both sides said they hoped to reach an agreement before the current contract expires July 31.Bethlehem and the Steelworkers union have been engaged in preliminary talks about local issues at individual plants, according to Bethlehem spokesman Henry Von Spreckelsen.
NEWS
March 20, 1993
Clara GieskeBaltimore nativeClara Gieske, who was 100 and lived for many years in Catonsville, died Thursday of a respiratory infection at Fairhaven, the Sykesville retirement community where she lived for the past 12 years.Earlier, she lived in a Beaumont Avenue home that her husband, Walter M. Gieske, an architect, designed before his death in 1926. The former Clara Ehlen was a Baltimore native. At age 5, she was taught needlework by her grandmother. Services were to be conducted at 3 p.m. today in the chapel at Fairhaven, 7200 Third Ave.She is survived by a sister, Naomi Ridgeway Ehlen of Baltimore; two nieces, Martha Ehlen Fitzgerald of Lakeville, Conn.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2004
After Randall Shifflett spent Christmas break working at the General Motors plant in Baltimore for the first time - earning double-time for all 14 days - he took the $1,400 paycheck and bought his dream car: a 1971 Pontiac Firebird, royal blue with white racing stripes on the hood. GM paychecks have since paid for the five cars that sit on the lawn of his house in Dundalk next to the above-ground pool, plus the big-screen television and the 1986 Bayliner Cuddy Cabin cruiser he takes fishing off Miller Island.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2004
As a machine operator at Hedwin Corp. in Baltimore, Grace Heughan spent yesterday afternoon opening plastic cubes and hanging them on hooks at the factory. Her factory. Heughan, a five-year employee, is among about 300 workers at the maker of industrial plastic containers who have bought Hedwin in an effort to keep their jobs from moving out of Maryland. About 100 Hedwin employees from outside the state also participated in the purchase. "I was grateful that they did it because a lot of people would have been out of jobs - including me," said Heughan, 44, who works on the line assembling "cubitainers" used to store liquids, from medical chemicals to Japanese saki for restaurants.
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