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BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1999
McCormick & Co. Inc. will fire about 300 workers -- mostly overseas -- and close some European plants to free up money for such growth-boosting initiatives as new products and increased marketing, the Sparks-based spice company said yesterday.Although the firings represent about 4 percent of its worldwide work force, fewer than 15 local workers will lose their jobs, the company said. Once completed over the next eight or nine months, the job cuts and plant closings will generate about $6 million annually that the company can deploy however needed to generate higher sales, the company said.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Worthington Industries warned state officials Wednesday that it will close its 54-employee steel processing plant in Essex next year, a move that follows the collapse last year of the nearby Sparrows Point steel mill. "With the consolidation of the steel industry, many of the mills that previously supplied the Baltimore facility have closed, negatively impacting the supply chain there," Worthington said in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing. "The Company has concluded that it can more efficiently service its customers in the Mid-Atlantic Region from other Worthington facilities and processing partners.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | June 2, 2009
Legendary automaker General Motors Corp. on Monday became the largest U.S. industrial company ever to file for bankruptcy-law protection, in a restructuring that puts it under unprecedented government ownership and jump-starts a plan that will include plant closings and thousands of job losses, but that the company hopes will return it to profitability. The transmission plant in White Marsh will remain open, but a Wilmington, Del., plant that has many workers who live in the Baltimore area will shut down July 31. The bankruptcy reflects the downfall of what was once an icon in the auto industry whose management problems were exacerbated so badly by the global recession that the Obama administration stepped in to take over.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
An aging, little-used power plant in Williamsport is slated to be closed later this year rather than meet new federal air-pollution limits, its owner announced Thursday, in what could be a spate of such shutdowns resulting from the controversial Obama administration regulation. FirstEnergy Corp. said it intends to retire six of its older coal-burning plants in three states, including the R. Paul Smith generating station in Western Maryland on the banks of the Potomac River. The company, based in Akron, Ohio, said it had decided it wouldn't be worth it to invest in new air-emission controls to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's recently finalized regulation requiring steep reductions in mercury and other hazardous pollutants.
BUSINESS
By John Lippert and Greg Gardner and John Lippert and Greg Gardner,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 24, 1992
DETROIT -- In a nationwide teleconference today, General Motors Corp. Chairman Robert Stempel is expected to open the next traumatic chapter in GM history -- including cost-cutting measures to deal with a $3.5 billion loss for 1991 and some plant closings that will spare Michigan's Willow Run assembly plant but could sacrifice a Texas factory.Mr. Stempel also may announce other plant closings and comment on efforts to trim thousands of white-collar jobs, said GM and United Auto Workers officials who asked not to be named.
BUSINESS
By John Lippert and Greg Gardner and John Lippert and Greg Gardner,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 24, 1992
DETROIT -- In a nationwide teleconference today, General Motors Corp. Chairman Robert Stempel is expected to open the next traumatic chapter in GM history -- including cost cutting to deal with a $3.5 billion loss for 1991 and plant closings that will spare Michigan's Willow Run assembly plant but could sacrifice a Texas factory.Mr. Stempel also may announce other plant closings and comment on efforts to trim thousands of white-collar jobs, said GM and United Auto Workers officials who asked not to be named.
BUSINESS
By RICK POPELY AND JIM MATEJA and RICK POPELY AND JIM MATEJA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 3, 2005
CHICAGO -- Ford Motor Co. may close up to five North American assembly plants and shed thousands of jobs in a bid to operate its factories at capacity and make its struggling automotive operations profitable. Ford's board is scheduled to review a restructuring plan next week that includes closings and job cuts. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer William Clay Ford Jr. has said the plans will be made public in January. Speculation about the factories on the list has been swirling for weeks.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
Seagram Co., the Montreal-based conglomerate that operates a liquor bottling plant in Relay, announced yesterday that it will close some warehouses, bottling plants and distilleries throughout its worldwide operations in an effort to boost profits.The company reported a third-quarter loss of $55 million that included a $290 million pretax charge to cover the cost of plant closings and the elimination of jobs.Chris Tofalli, a spokesman for Seagram in New York, said most of the plant closings will be in Europe, but there will be some in the United States.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 15, 1995
Ending months of speculation about Procter & Gamble Co.'s corporate succession, the company's board yesterday named John Pepper, 56, a gentlemanly consensus-builder who is a 32-year veteran of the company, to be chairman and chief executive beginning July 1.He will succeed Edwin Artzt, Procter's autocratic leader for the last five years, whose departure had been expected.The board of the consumer-products giant appeared to be naming not only the heir apparent but also an heir apparent to him: Durk Jager, 51, a highly competitive strategist with an impatient streak, will replace Mr. Pepper as president and assume the newly created position of chief operating officer.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | December 9, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer met with top management of the General Motors Corp.'s Baltimore plant yesterday and, although he received no promises of a long-term future for the plant, he said he was somewhat optimistic that GM would maintain its minivan factory here.The governor came away more convinced than ever "that all of the ingredients are there for what we hope will be a bright future," Mark L. Wasserman, secretary of the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development, said after the private two-hour session at the Broening Highway complex.
NEWS
January 13, 2011
Is there a person in Baltimore who honestly believes that Pepsi is closing its manufacturing plant in Hampden because of the city's 2-cent tax on beverage containers? If so, they're clearly drinking something a lot stronger than Mountain Dew. Pepsi's decision to halt production in Baltimore for good this week isn't welcome news. It means 77 people have lost their jobs — although several hundred other Pepsi employees will continue to sell and distribute soft drinks from that location.
NEWS
June 10, 2010
In the same week that officials in Baltimore County proudly touted the addition of 200 manufacturing jobs at a Middle River plant that will make brakes for a new Boeing airplane came word of the county's biggest single economic hit of the recession: The Solo Cup plant in Owings Mills is closing in two years at a cost of 540 jobs. The announcement is a blow to a county that, like many places in this country, has lost traditional manufacturing jobs. But it appears to be no particular commentary on either the county or state's business climate.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | June 2, 2009
Legendary automaker General Motors Corp. on Monday became the largest U.S. industrial company ever to file for bankruptcy-law protection, in a restructuring that puts it under unprecedented government ownership and jump-starts a plan that will include plant closings and thousands of job losses, but that the company hopes will return it to profitability. The transmission plant in White Marsh will remain open, but a Wilmington, Del., plant that has many workers who live in the Baltimore area will shut down July 31. The bankruptcy reflects the downfall of what was once an icon in the auto industry whose management problems were exacerbated so badly by the global recession that the Obama administration stepped in to take over.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
General Motors said Thursday that it will temporarily shut down operations at 13 assembly plants in North America, including several served by the Powertrain Baltimore Transmission Plant in White Marsh, for as long as 13 weeks this summer. The shutdowns mean the White Marsh plant will have to close for four to eight weeks, possibly beginning in May, said John Raut, a spokesman for the plant. The company is examining vehicle orders at the assembly plants it serves to determine the impact on the local plant.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | March 16, 2008
With sweeping views of the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace's historic downtown and savory fare, the new owners of the Tidewater Grille promise patrons a dining experience worth the drive. What Ralph M. Shapot and Keith Sappington cannot guarantee is convenient parking. The nearest spaces will be fenced off for the next 18 months, while the nearby water plant undergoes a $7.7 million expansion. Unless diners are willing to park several blocks away and walk to the restaurant at the foot of Franklin Street, which is none too visible from the main city streets, the owners fear they will lose the life savings they sank into the venture.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
LUKE -- The NewPage paper mill in Western Maryland burns 1,400 tons of coal a day to transform rough logs into rivers of shiny white paper for glossy catalogues such as Pottery Barn and Williams-Sonoma. Another product: 1.9 million metric tons a year of carbon dioxide, a gas that scientists have concluded causes global warming.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
When Henry Bert landed a well-paying job at the local GM assembly plant in 1966, he thought he was set for life.Now, at the age of 45, the assembly line worker is not so sure there will be a General Motors plant in Baltimore for the rest of his career.Like thousands of his co-workers at the Broening Highway minivan assembly plant, Mr. Bert was relieved to learn yesterday that Baltimore had escaped the company's latest round of plant closings.Although Baltimore survived this time, Mr. Bert is worried about what's ahead.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
Maryland's struggling defense industry took another direct hit yesterday when Grumman Corp. announced it would close its military aircraft cable plant in Salisbury, eliminating 244 jobs by the end of next year.The Grumman move will be particularly painful for this Eastern Shore town because loss of the well-paying jobs comes on the heels of Campbell Soup Co.'s decision to close its plant there this summer, laying off about 830 workers.a tragic loss for the community," said Robert L. Kiley, the Wicomico County economic development director.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
As reported Dec. 30, 1990, in The Howard Sun: Two decades of the General Electric Appliance Park East in Columbia come to an end Tuesday when the plant officially closes, but about 65 of the remaining employees will be able to continue working there for at least another year with a new employer. The employees are among about 140 workers GE laid off Friday. They have been hired by Holman Contract Warehousing, the contractor chosen to operate the center until the operation moves to Aberdeen in Harford County.
BUSINESS
By Rick Pearson and Rick Pearson,Chicago Tribune | September 15, 2007
NEWTON, Iowa -- Soon the only items coming out of Newton bearing the Maytag name will be the blue cheese made famous at the farms created by the appliance giant's founding family. Before October ends, the final few hundred washer-dryer assembly workers at the immense Plant 2 at Maytag Corp.'s world headquarters will clock out and get their last paychecks, shuttering an operation that had employed as many as 2,600 workers five years ago. It will be one more step in the $2.6 billion acquisition and consolidation begun last year by rival appliance-maker Whirlpool Corp.
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