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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2010
Question: I have a 7-foot Dracena marginata in my living room. Recently I noticed an ammonia scent coming from the soil. It's sporadic but smelly. Any thoughts? Answer: Sounds like an overwatering issue. Saturated soil decomposes anaerobically (no oxygen is available because the water takes up all the empty soil spaces.) This process stinks — think of a swamp or sewer. Draceneas do need high humidity however. To achieve this, especially during winter months when heating systems tend to dry indoor air, create a moist atmosphere by standing plant pots on trays or saucers of moist pebbles.
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NEWS
October 7, 2014
It is time to plug the loopholes for coal-fired power plants in Maryland ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). A report by the Maryland Department of the Environment found that many of the coal fired power plants in Maryland had not used their pollution controls continuously. If the Brandon Shores and Wagner plants had used their controls continuously in 2012, they could have cut nitrous oxide emissions by 2,000 tons. So what's the problem with nitrous oxide?
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FEATURES
By Baltimore Sun reporter | November 19, 2009
Question: These end-of- season plant sales look great, but I'm worried about timing. How late can I plant? Question: As long as the ground isn't frozen, you can put in containerized or ball-and-burlapped plants. Fruit trees would be an exception.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
Ann Porter Lundy, a former president of the Maryland Orchid Society and founder of Baltimore's chapter of the Maryland Native Plant Society, died Sept. 28 of cancer at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore. She was 70. "She taught a lot of people about gardens, plants and life," said her husband, A. Lee Lundy Jr., a partner at the law firm of Tydings & Rosenberg LLP. "She meant a lot to a lot of people. " Ann Lundy was born March 25, 1944, in Palm Beach, Fla., in the Breakers Hotel, which was then being used as a troop and maternity hospital.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 21, 2012
Maryland farmers planted a record acreage in pollution-absorbing "cover crops" this past fall, state officials announced today, hailing it as a new milestone in the Chesapeake Bay restoration effort. With the state paying them to do so, farmers seeded a total of 429,818 acres statewide in wheat, barley and other crops before winter set in, in what scientists say is one of the most cost-effective ways to curb nutrient pollution fouling the bay.  The plant nutrients in fertilizer - phosphorus and nitrogen - are prone to wash off or soak into ground water if left in the soil after the fall harvest, contributing to the formation of the bay's "dead zone" every summer, where fish and crabs can't get enough dissolved oxygen to breathe.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2010
Alcoa Inc. says it will dismantle the Eastalco Works aluminum smelting complex near Frederick that ceased production in 2005. The Pittsburgh-based company says it has no plans for the 2,000-acre property about five miles south of Frederick. A spokesman says the ground will be tested for hazardous materials and chemicals. More than 600 workers were laid off when Alcoa idled the plant in December 2005, citing high electricity costs. Some local lawmakers have suggested offering the site for a federal diplomatic security training center that has met resistance at a proposed location in Queen Anne's County.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
When we realized our zucchini were dying of squash vine borer, we tried making the vertical cuts in the stem and fishing out the white grubby worms, but we were too late. How can we never have that happen to our beautiful zucchini? Plant late and protect. Put out transplants or plant seeds in mid-June. Then keep them covered with floating row cover until flowers open so the adult vine borer (a moth) can't get to the zucchini to lay its eggs. You'll still have time for plenty of zucchini and even more plantings.
BUSINESS
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Maryland energy regulators Thursday ordered the construction of the state's first new natural gas power plant since the state's electric power market was deregulated more than a decade ago. In a decision questioned by other power producers, the Maryland Public Service Commission said it awarded a contract to CPV Maryland LLC to build the new $500 million facility in the Charles County town of Waldorf. The order calls for three of the state's largest publicly regulated power companies, including Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., to buy electricity from the plant.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
Regarding your article about the proposed waste-to-energy plant in South Baltimore, I don't think it's a good idea to have another such plant in the area since there is already such a high concentration of pollution there ("Delay sought for trash-burning power plant in Fairfield," Jan. 9). If we are trying to reduce pollutants in the air, all a new plant would do is discourage recycling and make it even harder to build other "green" energy projects. That's a step backward, not forward.
EXPLORE
By Aegis staff report | June 1, 2011
Visitors who attend Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station's Community Information Night will find answers to questions about how nuclear energy is generated, according to the owner of the plant on the Susquehanna River near Delta, Pa., just north of the Harford County border. The free event will be held in the station's training center Thursday, June 2, from 5 to 8 p.m. Station employees will be on hand to educate visitors on station operations; site maintenance; engineering practices; environmental stewardship; industrial and radiological safety; site security; and emergency preparedness.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A project to install emergency generators at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant at 8900 Greenwood Place in Savage is scheduled to begin Monday. Three 2,500-kilowatt emergency power generators and 15-kilovolt switchgear will be installed to provide a third power source for the plant, in the event the two independent Baltimore Gas and Electric power feeds are disrupted, according to a news release from the county. The generators are part of the county's $8.1 million electrical protection system upgrade in an effort to safeguard the Water Reclamation Plant from outages that could lead to sewage overflows, such as that which occurred during Superstorm Sandy.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The energy company Dominion said Tuesday that it is exploring developing an alternate evacuation route for some residential neighbors of its proposed Cove Point liquefied natural gas plant, prompting opponents to question anew assertions by the company and federal regulators that the facility poses no significant safety or environmental risks. Karl R. Neddenien, spokesman for the Richmond, Va.-based company, declined to offer details but said Dominion is "looking into" establishing an alternate route for residents living on Cove Point to get away should there be an emergency at the facility.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Russell R. Jones, former general manager of Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant, died Wednesday of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 90. The son of restaurant owners Russell Wehr Jones and Noelie Delores Richard Jones, Russell Richard Jones was born and raised in Lehighton, Pa., where he graduated in 1941 from high school. His college studies at Lehigh University were interrupted when he enlisted in the Army Air Forces, where he was trained as a bomber pilot and later trained B-29 pilots.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Federal regulators gave final approval Monday for energy company Dominion to build the East Coast's first natural gas liquefaction plant at its Cove Point site in Calvert County, a project that has raised concerns from neighbors and environmentalists. The $3.8 billion project would allow Dominion to export liquefied natural gas through the facility on the Chesapeake Bay. It plans to complete the project and begin exporting by June 2017, adding about 75 jobs to the approximately 100 already at the site.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Thomas L. Kitchner Jr., a recently retired Baltimore Sun employee who had worked previously at Westinghouse Electric Corp., died Sept. 21 at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of complications from a fall. He was 66. Thomas Leonard Kitchner Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Brooklyn Park. He graduated in 1966 from Merganthaler Technical-Vocational High School and enlisted in the Army in 1968. He served with an infantry unit and saw combat in Vietnam. He was discharged in 1968 and later earned an associate's degree from what is now the Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment recently revealed a draft rule that would finally require coal-powered plants in the Baltimore-Washington region to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 48 percent over the next four years ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). Nitrogen oxides contribute heavily to the formation of ground-level ozone (smog) and seriously exacerbate cardiopulmonary health problems such as asthma. Smog is worse when air is still and hot, but 2014 has been relatively cool so there have been fewer "orange alerts" for dangerous air. But Maryland still has some of the worst air on the Eastern seaboard, due largely to coal.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
State regulators gave the final go-ahead Tuesday to Old Dominion Electric Cooperative to start building a new $675 million power plant in Cecil County. The new Wildcat Point Generation Facility, fueled by natural gas, will help Old Dominion meet the region's growing demand for electricity, CEO Jackson Reasor said. The plant, located next to the cooperative's existing property in Conowingo, is expected to generate 1,000 megawatts of electricity each year, power for roughly 390,000 homes.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Constellation Energy Group said Monday that it had terminated a deal to sell its Quail Run natural gas plant in West Texas to a municipal utility in that state. The deal was contingent on the High Plains Diversified Energy Corp. obtaining financing through the sale of municipal bonds. The deal had been worth $185.3 million. With the sale termination, Constellation will retain ownership of the plant. Separately, Maryland energy regulators have scheduled a hearing on June 28 to determine a schedule to review Constellation's deal to sell itself to Chicago-based Exelon Corp.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
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