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Planning Time

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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
Using a strength-in-numbers strategy, more than 350 Carroll County elementary teachers packed a school budget hearing last night in their continuing fight for planning time.The issue has been a rallying point for teachers since the county Board of Education decided two months ago to eliminate built-in time for lesson planning from next year's school calendar.Superintendent William H. Hyde announced last night that the county schools staff has prepared another proposed calendar that attempts to address the planning-time issue.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The Howard County school system and its teachers' union have reached a tentative agreement for a new contract, avoiding potential arbitration and resolving disputes that lingered throughout the past school year. The one-year deal announced Friday, which must be ratified by the school board and Howard County Education Association members, calls for a 3 percent raise as well as a half-step increase retroactive to July 1. Step increases are based on length of service. Another half-step would be given in a lump-sum payment July 1 of next year.
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NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 22, 1993
Art, music, physical education and media teachers in the county's elementary schools are worried that their needs are getting lost in discussions designed to find planning time for regular classroom teachers.These so-called special-area teachers say that they are being asked to carry an unfair burden as school administrators, teachers and parents wrestle with the issue of how to make up for the eight half-days of planning time regular teachers lost when the school board voted to eliminate them in last April.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
As contract negotiations between county schools and the teachers union continue to focus on salary adjustments, union officials have encouraged teachers to take part in two school-day activities they believe will drum up community support for the union. But Howard County Superintendent Renee Foose has questioned teachers' involvement in such actions, saying she's concerned such displays could leave "a bad taste in the mouth of public opinion. " The union has orchestrated teacher activities it said were designed to take its message to the community.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | December 18, 1994
Harford elementary school teachers are getting solid support from parents in their quest for more planning time.The Harford County Council of PTAs (HCCPTA) submitted the results of a parent questionnaire on teacher planning time to the school board Monday. Of the 3,805 responses, 89 percent of the parents agreed that teachers need extra planning hours."We parents are in the schools. We parents directly see the needs of our teachers and staff," said Kathy Carmello, a member of the HCCPTA executive board and president of the Bel Air High PTA. "Additional planning time can only increase the quality of our children's education."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1999
How to provide adequate lesson planning time for Carroll County's elementary teachers dominated the discussion last night at the first town meeting held by school Superintendent William H. Hyde.The topic has surfaced as a controversial issue in the past two months after the Board of Education decided to eliminate built-in time for lesson planning from next year's school calendar.The time is being provided, as in previous years, by starting school late -- six days this academic year."What everyone wants is quality education for our children, but if we as teachers don't have the time to prepare," the quality of instruction will suffer, said Karen Conley, a teacher at Carrolltowne Elementary School.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1999
Proposed changes to Carroll's school calendar have eliminated the built-in lesson-planning time during the school day for elementary teachers.School board members are committed to restoring the lost time, and one solution might be to spend more to hire additional instructional staff.Elementary planning time, always a topic of controversy, resurfaced last month when the Board of Education directed school staff to remove the late-start and early-dismissal days from the school calendar in response to parent concerns.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
A group of parents, teachers and union representatives believe they've found the perfect solution to the shortage of planning time during school hours for elementary teachers.The plan, which has the unanimous approval of the executive boards of the Harford County Education Association -- the teachers union -- and the Harford County Council of PTAs, would start elementary classes one hour late one day a week.Teachers would use that hour to plan lessons, grade papers or meet with other teachers, HCEA President Jean R. Thomas said at a news conference Friday afternoon.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
Baltimore teachers and paraprofessionals overwhelmingly approved a two-year contract yesterday that will give them a 4.5 percent pay raise this year and a 4 percent increase next year but will not resolve proposed changes affecting planning time, an issue that will stay in mediation. The vote at Polytechnic Institute had been held up for months as the school board and union remained at an impasse over the use of planning time and a health care issue involving emergency room visits. Last week, both sides agreed to a vote without those disputed issues on the table.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
As contract negotiations between county schools and the teachers union continue to focus on salary adjustments, union officials have encouraged teachers to take part in two school-day activities they believe will drum up community support for the union. But Howard County Superintendent Renee Foose has questioned teachers' involvement in such actions, saying she's concerned such displays could leave "a bad taste in the mouth of public opinion. " The union has orchestrated teacher activities it said were designed to take its message to the community.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
The Howard County school system is considering major changes to its middle school class schedule that include discontinuing reading as a stand-alone subject for most students, school officials said. In addition, the school day might be reduced from eight instruction periods to seven 50-minute periods, with physical education classes held every other day. The proposed changes are part of the system's efforts to implement the common core curriculum, adopted by the Maryland State Board of Education last year for math and English language arts.
EXPLORE
July 19, 2011
If the Baltimore County Board of Education wants to show proof why a shake-up is needed in its all-appointed membership, it's doing a great job. The public perception is growing that the board defers when decisive action is in order. Last week, the board was handed an opportunity to prove that perception wrong. At issue: Policy 1300, the controversial rule that restricts the use of school property by for-profit vendors - such as those at craft fairs and the like. The policy has greatly hampered events such as PTA-sponsored craft fairs that raise money to help the host schools.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
--A 2 percent, retroactive pay increase and a $1,500 stipend will take effect in this school year. --Pay in the last two years of the contract will be based on a yet-to-be-determined system that ties student performance to teacher evaluations. --Teachers will climb a four-tiered career ladder that will pay some more than $100,000 and encourage more pursuit of professional development and school-based leadership. --All schools will employ "school-based options" in the third year of the contract -- a plan under which 80 percent of teachers in a school could help set working conditions not outlined in the general contract, such as a longer workday or more planning time.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
Baltimore teachers began voting Wednesday on what is being hailed as one of the most progressive union contracts to emerge in the nation, which, if ratified, would give teachers unprecedented pay and autonomy and tie raises to proven effectiveness in the classroom. Hundreds of the union's approximately 6,500 teachers participated in early voting at the Baltimore Teachers Union headquarters Wednesday evening, shaping up for what union officials anticipate will be a near-record turnout for the ratification vote.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | April 9, 2008
The Baltimore school board voted last night on the latest round of school closings and an arbitrator's ruling on teacher planning time, an issue that sparked a dispute between the Baltimore Teachers Union and schools chief Andres Alonso. The board acted on several school closures and reconfigurations, including officially closing this summer four middle schools that were being phased out: Dr. Roland N. Patterson Sr. Academy and Robert Poole, Thurgood Marshall and Harlem Park middle schools.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | March 13, 2008
An arbitrator has issued a ruling in the dispute between Baltimore schools chief Andres Alonso and the city teachers union over planning time, handing a partial victory to both sides but largely giving Alonso what he wants. Alonso has pushed for principals at all schools to be able to require teachers to spend 45 minutes of their existing planning time each week collaborating with colleagues. The arbitrator's opinion allows for that at most schools. But at a small number of elementary schools, the arbitrator ruled that the city school system should give teachers more planning time if the group sessions are mandated.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
Baltimore teachers and paraprofessionals overwhelmingly approved a two-year contract yesterday that will give them a 4.5 percent pay raise this year and a 4 percent increase next year but will not resolve proposed changes affecting planning time, an issue that will stay in mediation. The vote at Polytechnic Institute had been held up for months as the school board and union remained at an impasse over the use of planning time and a health care issue involving emergency room visits. Last week, both sides agreed to a vote without those disputed issues on the table.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
Republican state legislators said yesterday that Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to expand health care programs is ill-timed and merely a political carrot to draw votes for a deficit-reduction plan that raises a number of taxes. O'Malley called the Maryland General Assembly into a special session this week to plug a projected $1.7 billion gap for the fiscal year that begins in July, and legislative committees have begun to delve into various aspects of his plan. A joint Senate-House hearing addressed the governor's health care proposal, which could eventually expand government-funded programs so that more than 100,000 residents can obtain insurance.
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