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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1996
Just as the county and Carroll's eight municipalities have come to an agreement on large increases in development review fees, the whole program could fall under the budget ax.Site plans, permits, engineering and inspections, which the county provides for the towns, could be cut along with other services as part of a broad package of budget-trimming measures that the County Commissioners are considering to deal with a projected $5 million shortfall.Two...
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NEWS
By Jennifer Bevan-Dangel | July 9, 2012
With all the recent press over the proposed redevelopment of the Solo Cup site in Owings Mills, the casual reader would think this is an isolated issue that boils down to one community that will see new traffic patterns or new places to shop. But Solo Cup is just one piece of a conversation that will affect neighborhoods across Baltimore County. A conversation that is expressed in upzoning (to allow more intense development on a property) and downzoning (to allow less). A conservation that is expressed in community desires and developer dollars.
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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
There's gold in the hills of Carroll County, but not much. Miners are more likely to find limestone, greenstone or shale.The county'smineral resources are spread throughout the county, with concentrations of limestone in Wakefield Valley, greenstone in the central area,and shale in the northwest, a county planning report says.Gold reportedly was found in five areas, including a ridge running from Cranberry Valley to north of Manchester and in copper mines inSykesville, the report says.The county never has had a comprehensive plan for handling its mineral resources and now is seeking inputfrom a committee of residents to help write a plan.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Baltimore County high schools are beginning to decide which classes — likely the electives and small Advanced Placement courses — they won't be able to afford next year, as they begin eliminating as much as 10 percent of their faculty. The reduction to the teaching force is being felt hardest at the high schools, where class sizes will rise from an average of 26 this year to 29 next year, according to budget documents. Elementaries, which the system protected from cuts through second grade, stand to gain five teachers overall because enrollment is growing.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
The Carroll commissioners moved yesterday toward rejecting the county planning commission's growth plan for the area immediately around Hampstead, a decision that could lead to a broader debate between the two panels about county planning and zoning practices. The commissioners agreed to schedule a work session with the county planning staff to learn more about the plan for the Hampstead area. The commissioners said that after that session they probably would ask the planning commission to reconsider its stance against rezoning any properties around Hampstead from residential to agricultural designations.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | October 30, 1991
The county planning board yesterday endorsed a third major change toColumbia's master development plan, one that would allow 500 more apartments and town houses in Town Center.If approved by the countyzoning board, the revised plan also will add 89 acres to the unincorporated city and rezone commercial tracts to allow 1,600 more residential units in Long Reach village.Following the county planning staff's recommendation, the planning board favored making only one small change in the Rouse Co.'s menu of plan alterations.
NEWS
February 9, 1999
South Carroll residents will have to wait another month to hear what the county planning commission will recommend or reject from the proposed development plan for their area.The commission will meet Feb. 16, but the Freedom Area Comprehensive Plan will not be on its agenda until March 16. The panel will schedule a public work session this month in Eldersburg. The date and location have not been scheduled.About 500 residents attended a public hearing Jan. 7 on the proposed plan, which addresses growth issues in south Carroll, the county's most populous area.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | April 21, 1992
Friends and foes of development in Perry Hall and White Marsh, new zoning for marinas and boatyards, increased commercialization of Belair Road, and protection for rural Kingsville are expected to turn out in force tonight for a public hearing on eastern Baltimore County by the planning board."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | April 23, 1992
Conflicts between industrial and residential land use shape ,, many of the rezoning issues in Baltimore County's 6th Councilmanic District, where the county Planning Board will hold a public hearing at 7:30 tonight at Parkville High School, 2600 Putty Hill Ave. Registration for speakers begins at 6 p.m."Some of these residential areas are suffering a lot of truck traffic generated by industry," says Gary Kerns, chief of community planning.Many trucks already use the two-lane Philadelphia Road in the eastern part of the county as an alternative to Pulaski Highway or Interstate 95, Mr. Kerns says, and much of the land yet to be developed is zoned for industrial use.In January, the County Council adopted a land-use plan for the Philadelphia Road corridor from Rossville Boulevard north to Cowenton Avenue, and between Interstate 95 and the CSX railroad tracks.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2001
The first major residential project in downtown Annapolis in decades has stalled in recent months as developers and the city rework the proposal to fit the "quirkiness" of the state capital. Planning Commission hearings on the project, which is proposed by Virginia-based Madison Homes for the 4 1/2 -acre site to be vacated by the Anne Arundel Medical Center in late October, were to begin in the spring but are expected to start no sooner than September. The mammoth hospital buildings that stretch from the historic district into the quiet Murray Hill neighborhood could remain vacant for months before the project begins.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | January 29, 2008
Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that it would consolidate manufacturing plants and reduce personnel this year as the housing slump continues to take its toll on sales, which the company expects will decline this year. The cutbacks at the Towson power tools and home improvement company were announced as Black & Decker released its fourth-quarter and full-year earnings, which continued to suffer from the economic slow- down. Black & Decker Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Nolan D. Archibald told a conference call with analysts that declining sales would force the company to shift some manufacturing work to lower-cost sites but he declined to identify specific areas.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | May 30, 2006
Most staff members at four Baltimore schools must reapply for their jobs for next school year under restructuring plans approved by the city school board. The plans call for replacing "all or most of the school staff" at Ashburton/Nathan Pitts Elementary/Middle School, Highlandtown Elementary School No. 237, Vivien T. Thomas Medical Arts Academy and Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts. Officials said the staff replacement decisions will be based on student achievement data. No teachers will lose their jobs, but they might be reassigned to other schools.
NEWS
By HANAH CHO | October 16, 2005
Howard County's student enrollment projection for this school year was off by 73 children, according to David C. Drown, the school system's manager of school planning. School officials projected 47,858 students for the 2005-2006 year, but actual numbers as of Sept. 30 indicated that 73 fewer students, or 47,785 children, are enrolled in the school system - resulting in an error rate of 0.2 percent, Drown told school board and County Council members last week. Last school year's enrollment was 47,487 students.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Baltimore County's advisory Planning Board has rebuffed efforts to clamp down on development in the county, frustrating some community leaders who were hoping tougher anti-sprawl restrictions would emerge from the comprehensive zoning review now under way. As part of the once-every-four-years exercise in which any property in the county can be rezoned, the Baltimore County Planning Board has recommended against proposals to cut down on new development in...
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
Harford County is the only executive-led jurisdiction in the metropolitan area to function without a full-time internal auditor to oversee its financial operation. It will remain so. The County Council voted last week despite the absence of one of its members to kill a bill that would have allowed voters to decide whether they wanted an auditor. In a compromise presented by Council President Robert S. Wagner, the council unanimously approved a measure that would have the administration put $75,000 into the council's budget to hire an accountant on a contract basis.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
The Carroll commissioners moved yesterday toward rejecting the county planning commission's growth plan for the area immediately around Hampstead, a decision that could lead to a broader debate between the two panels about county planning and zoning practices. The commissioners agreed to schedule a work session with the county planning staff to learn more about the plan for the Hampstead area. The commissioners said that after that session they probably would ask the planning commission to reconsider its stance against rezoning any properties around Hampstead from residential to agricultural designations.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1996
The Butcher's Barn bull, the Bel-Loc Diner's rooftop neon and the Fox car dealerships' perky red foxes -- all threatened by Baltimore County's efforts to eliminate the visual clutter of roadside signs -- may be spared bureaucratic banishment after all.Seeking to restrict the size and number of signs along commercial corridors such as York and Joppa roads and Route 40 West, the county planning board two years ago proposed one of the strictest sign laws in...
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
Rejecting changes sought by its own chairman, the Baltimore County Planning Board approved the development plan of the Hayfields golf course community with only minor modifications yesterday.Board Chairman Phillip W. Worrall, who had proposed moving houses, golf holes and the banquet facilities at the plan's proposed country club, recused himself from the three-hour deliberations and left the meeting before the vote.He said he had been advised not to participate in the discussions because of a possible conflict of interest.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2002
Carroll commissioners took a first step yesterday toward revising the county's water and sewerage master plan, a document that Maryland environmental officials have used as their basis for rejecting a construction permit for a $15 million water treatment plant at Piney Run Lake in Sykesville. The commissioners reviewed the county planning staff's proposed revisions to the 62-page document, changes that would eliminate two arcane references - one to water resource organizations that no longer exist and the other to a county ordinance that sought to protect ground and surface water that was never passed.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2001
The first major residential project in downtown Annapolis in decades has stalled in recent months as developers and the city rework the proposal to fit the "quirkiness" of the state capital. Planning Commission hearings on the project, which is proposed by Virginia-based Madison Homes for the 4 1/2 -acre site to be vacated by the Anne Arundel Medical Center in late October, were to begin in the spring but are expected to start no sooner than September. The mammoth hospital buildings that stretch from the historic district into the quiet Murray Hill neighborhood could remain vacant for months before the project begins.
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