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Planning Process

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NEWS
October 19, 1995
EVEN THOUGH new residential development profoundly affects the existing residents of a neighborhood, they often feel as though they don't have a significant say in planning decisions that affect the quality of their lives, not to mention the value of their properties. Establishing local planning councils throughout the county is an excellent proposal to give citizens a meaningful say in the development process.The impetus for the new councils is coming from South Carroll, which in the past decade has witnessed an explosion of residential and commercial development.
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NEWS
Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate said Larry Hogan indicated Wednesday that his opposition to state financing of the construction of Baltimore's Red Line and another large transit project doesn't necessarily mean forever. Hogan continued to insist, as he has since launching his campaign, that the state cannot afford to begin building the $2.6 billion Red Line and $2.4 billion Purple Line In the Washington suburbs at this time.  “I'm not really opposed to the Red Line or the Purple Line and both of them I think are worth considering and I'm not even opposed to continuing along the planning and engineering phases, but quite frankly, you know, we've robbed a billion dollars out of the Transportation Trust Fund,” Hogan said.
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NEWS
October 16, 2000
TURN AROUND FOR a moment, blink and you may need another school, two libraries and a wider road. Your plan? Out the window. Still, you have to have a plan. The problems are too complex to be dealt with on the fly, when they arrive complete with crisis. In the best of all possible worlds, planning is democracy, involving voters in the shaping of their future. The key is communication. Suspicious citizens will sympathize with County Councilwoman Mary C. Lorsung who discovered earlier this week that Howard High School may be expanding more than planned.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
More than two dozen West Baltimore homeowners are suing the state of Maryland to block the planned Red Line transit project from tunneling beneath their block, contending that they were inappropriately left out of the planning process. They seek more than $22 million in damages for lost property value and emotional distress. "Right now, they've lost so much of the value of their homes," said Lewyn Scott Garrett, one of three attorneys representing the 25 homeowners in the 300 block of N. Fremont Ave. in the city's Poppleton neighborhood.
NEWS
May 13, 1998
RESIDENTS have a rare opportunity to plan the future of their communities. They shouldn't forfeit it.Although complaining about poor planning is a popular pastime, the audiences have been pathetic at meetings of Anne Arundel County's small area planning process.Last week, for example, a forum in Crofton drew a smattering of a couple of dozen people.Crofton residents who did not show up lost an opportunity to hear about future projects, potential land-use changes and public improvements planned for their community.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 16, 1997
Baltimore's comprehensive master planning process will be conducted from a regional perspective and coordinated with an effort under way in Baltimore County, organizers promised yesterday.Addressing more than 100 civic leaders and others at the official kickoff for the $500,000 planning effort yesterday, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke urged city planners to work closely with their counterparts in Baltimore County and other jurisdictions to produce a report that won't simply gather dust on the shelf.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | July 26, 1993
First of three parts.There are only a few days left to July. Starting next week, chances are better than even you won't be able to get a thing done in Maryland until September -- at least anything that requires more than two people getting together.So, between answering phones because everyone else in the office is at the beach, here are some thoughts to consider about planning, apparently the word on the lips of nearly every nonprofit executive last spring, regardless of the size of their organization.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | August 2, 1993
Planning is essential to the success of any organization. Without adequate planning, organizations are subject to the winds of fortune, and never seem to move their agenda forward or thrive.I have seen many an organization with wonderful visions fade into second-rate status because they never booked sufficient planning time, either through fear or avoidance or both.I'm not being facetious when I say that the first step in any planning process for a nonprofit organization is for key decision-makers to agree that they need to plan.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
School project lacks planning Why has the Mount Hebron High School project been so controversial and costly? The answer would be "planning"-- the lack of. While other counties follow a process recommended by the state of Maryland, the Howard County public school system has used an inconsistent and difficult to comprehend planning process. A set of standards and a goal are the usual starting point for architects because they determine a project's scope and what the required results will be. Past HCPSS projects have sporadically used the Board of Education's 1999 Educational Specifications to determine a school's needs.
NEWS
April 4, 2000
BUSINESS-friendly is one thing, citizen-friendly is another. Those two fundamental objectives for Carroll County need to be reconciled in streamlining the development planning process. County officials want to simplify the planning process by exempting business developments of under 20,000 feet from planning commission review. Plans also call for cutting in half the building permit fees paid by small-scale projects, and exempting projects under 5,000 square feet from landscaping requirements.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Ocean City announced last week it will crack down on profanity on the boardwalk, but the city council is also considering banning another public vice - smoking on the beach. Mayor Rick Meehan said smoking came up as one of the council's three priorities in its planning process for work sessions next month. (The other two were a tax differential between the city and Worcester County, and downtown redevelopment.) "It's been talked about for a number of years," Meehan said, pointing out the environmental problem of cigarette butts littering the sand as well as smoking's health issues.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | January 24, 2014
Howard County government took the first step last week toward purchasing and redeveloping the Long Reach Village Center by introducing legislation designating the area as an urban renewal zone. The county announced its plans to buy a portion of the property, currently owned by Long Reach Village Associates, a spin-off of Pikesville-based Americas Realty, at a Long Reach Village Board meeting earlier this month. “The Long Reach community has long been concerned over the decline of the Village Center.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2013
Listening to the speech that Ken Ulman made on Monday, June 3 I was struck by his passion for Columbia. It is the same passion I have felt living in Columbia for 40 years. I too have loved this planned city that treats people equally. As proud as I am seeing one of our own named to the top of the ticket I am imbued with a sense of unease. One of the reasons many people came to Columbia was to live in a well thought out and carefully planned community. Columbia was the antidote to the hodgepodge exemplified by routes 1 and 40 and to escape the insidious and unethical practice of redlining!
NEWS
By Michael J. Kormos | August 29, 2011
Wind generators or windmills are sprouting up all over the United States. They're part of a growing move to expand the use of renewable energy sources, like wind and the sun, to produce electricity. Examples are everywhere. Construction of a 50-megawatt wind farm was just completed in New Mexico. Shovels will break ground in Indiana later this year for an even larger 100-megawatt wind farm. Contracts have been signed for a 49-megawatt solar project inOhio. Technology companies like Google are investing large amounts in renewable energy, including offshore wind projects along the Atlantic coast, because they recognize that it's the future.
NEWS
September 22, 2009
Md. needs energy plan In her op-ed "New energy will fuel new growth and pollution," (Sept. 13), Karen Hosler voiced concern about the lack of energy facility planning in Maryland. We are participating with a large number of national, statewide and local organizations advocating the development of a comprehensive energy plan for the state. We now have a process in which new facilities are driven primarily by that which is most profitable. There's nothing inherently wrong with a market-driven process, provided other equally important factors are given adequate consideration.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
School project lacks planning Why has the Mount Hebron High School project been so controversial and costly? The answer would be "planning"-- the lack of. While other counties follow a process recommended by the state of Maryland, the Howard County public school system has used an inconsistent and difficult to comprehend planning process. A set of standards and a goal are the usual starting point for architects because they determine a project's scope and what the required results will be. Past HCPSS projects have sporadically used the Board of Education's 1999 Educational Specifications to determine a school's needs.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | November 28, 1990
Baltimore's downtown planning effort is the subject of a series of brown-bag lunches sponsored this week and next by the Citizens Planning and Housing Association.The free lecture series, "Downtown Baltimore: The Shape of Things to Come," is designed to inform the public on the "Strategy for the Progressive Development of Downtown," an 18-month planning process launched by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke in May of 1989.During each session, citizens involved in a specific portion of the planning process will talk about their work so far and the recommendations they have made.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2001
Anne Arundel County's beleaguered community-based effort to draft a land-use and development plan hit another bump yesterday when County Executive Janet S. Owens called the grass-roots process "flawed" and its goals "unrealistic." Owens, who inherited the Small Area Planning process when she defeated former County Executive John G. Gary in 1998, made the comments after a County Council meeting during which members also were critical of the process. "It's a very difficult process to manage," said Owens.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
Planning process needs total overhaul In the editorial "Controlling growth" (March 13), The Sun states that "the current planning process is clearly broken." I strongly agree with that position. Here in Howard County, we have a beautifully written general plan, as is required by the state. The county executive and the County Council are responsible for implementing the plan through the comprehensive zoning amendment process, in which the status of all properties and regulations is up for revision.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
The dispute continues over the height of a planned 23-story condominium tower in central Columbia after a three-hour meeting failed to produce a compromise, increasing the likelihood that the contentious issue will affect work on the master plan for Town Center redevelopment. "I think everyone gave it a great try, and we weren't able to come to an agreement," said Barbara Lawson, the recently retired director of the Columbia Foundation, who acted as moderator.
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