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By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2003
The city Planning Department is undergoing a reorganization intended to give it a more active role in charting the city's development. Otis Rolley III, who became planning director in August, is eliminating 16 jobs, creating 20 new ones and replacing six divisions with three. Those changes, expected to take effect by Jan. 1, will help the agency guide Baltimore's development - a mission set out for the department in the city charter, but one that it got away from over the years, Rolley said.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Ernest L. Caldwell Jr., a retired senior city planner and urban designer who did early studies for what became Oriole Park at Camden Yards , died of complications of Parkinson's disease July 8 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Stoneleigh resident was 74. Colleagues said Mr. Caldwell, a longtime baseball fan, had an early and influential role in convincing city officials of the potential of the former Baltimore & Ohio Railroad property adjacent to Camden Station as the site of a new sports field.
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NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2004
Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, a city agency that rules on such sensitive development issues as whether landmarks should be saved or can be demolished, will become part of the city Planning Department, Mayor Martin O'Malley's office announced yesterday. The merger, which was initially introduced as a City Council bill, has preservationists worried that the reorganization will muzzle the 40-year-old commission and dilute its authority as a watchdog on behalf of buildings of architectural or historical distinction.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | May 21, 2014
The owner of The Baltimore Sun wants to find partners to develop about 37 acres of unused land next to the newspaper's printing plant in Port Covington. The plans are part of a broader push by Tribune Company to make more money from its real estate. Earlier this month, Tribune announced plans to sell the former Columbia Flier building to Howard County for $2.8 million. It also is working to sell property in Bel Air and in Greenwood Village, Colorado, according to financial statements.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
A proposed merger of Baltimore's preservation agency and Planning Department came a step closer yesterday after a City Council hearing showed that many local preservationists could support the arrangement, albeit with reservations. After hearing three hours of testimony about a council bill that would make Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP) part of the Planning Department, Urban Affairs Committee Chairwoman Paula Johnson Branch promised a final bill that would keep CHAP strong even though it would be integrated with the city department.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
There's gold in the hills of Carroll County, but not much. Miners are more likely to find limestone, greenstone or shale.The county'smineral resources are spread throughout the county, with concentrations of limestone in Wakefield Valley, greenstone in the central area,and shale in the northwest, a county planning report says.Gold reportedly was found in five areas, including a ridge running from Cranberry Valley to north of Manchester and in copper mines inSykesville, the report says.The county never has had a comprehensive plan for handling its mineral resources and now is seeking inputfrom a committee of residents to help write a plan.
NEWS
January 8, 1997
THE DECISION by the Anne Arundel County Planning Department to reject preliminary plans for the Village at Waugh Chapel is the equivalent of sending a meal back to the kitchen because it needs more cooking.Rather than viewing the department's action as a rebuke, developer Robert DeStefano should seize this opportunity. Since will have to resubmit his plans to the planning department, he can still create a development of exceptional design in western Anne Arundel.In his rejected plans, Mr. DeStefano identified the ingredients needed to create a "suburban community center."
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
Over the protests of preservationists, a City Council committee approved a proposal last night to merge Baltimore's historic preservation commission with the city Planning Department. In the bill that now goes to the full City Council for approval, the committee left out amendments urged by the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation - an omission that critics say will strip the commission of its power. "It feels like someone's trying to put a lid on us," Judith Miller, chairwoman of the CHAP board, said after the Urban Affairs Committee's 3-1 vote, with one abstention.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
WHAT'S GOING on at the city Planning Department? The agency has been without a permanent director since November. Now about a third of its planners are to be moved to the housing department. "Is this the end of the Department of Planning?" wonders a city councilman. A valid question. Mayor Martin O'Malley says the transfers are linked to his efforts to improve neighborhoods. The exact impact of the mayor's changes, which have not been publicly announced, is not yet known; they are still subject to budget deliberations with the City Council.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
If only a tenth of the people Councilwoman Shane Pendergrass invited to tomorrow's council hearing show up to testify, the council could be in for a long night.Ms. Pendergrass, D-1st, sent letters to 13 individuals and the presidents of 216 civic associations, saying she welcomed testimony on her bill to require the county Planning Department to set up an early warning system to alert residents to new development."The impetus for this legislation comes from community associations and residents concerned about the lack of prior notice of new subdivision activity in their community," Ms. Pendergrass said in her letter.
BUSINESS
By Jon Meoli and Lorraine Mirabella, Baltimore Sun Media Group | February 7, 2014
Plans for redevelopment in downtown Towson have prompted area merchants to consider face-lifts of their own, spurring renewed interest in a Baltimore County program for commercial revitalization. To keep up with projects that will bring new stores, restaurants and residences to Towson's core, several York Road businesses are working through county programs that offer design advice from architects and interest-free loans for exterior improvements. "They know that things are changing, so they want to take advantage of the change so that all boats will rise with this tide of change," said Andrea Van Arsdale, director of the county's Department of Planning.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Pride will only leave the port of Baltimore for a few months. Carnival Cruise Lines announced Thursday that its Carnival Pride cruise liner will return to the port of Baltimore in March 2015, after only a brief stint in Florida, thanks to new technologies that will help the ship meet federal emissions standards. Its return limits the economic impact of a decision in June, when the Miami-based company said it would move the Pride to Tampa starting in November 2014 due to increased costs of operating in coastal waters under the new regulations.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Gerald Allen Elkins, a retired Department of Planning map maker and graphic artist who detailed Baltimore's transformation for more than four decades, died of cancer Nov. 28 at his Ocean Pines home. The former Overlea resident was 65. "What struck me most about Gerry, besides his considerable graphic design talent, was his positive attitude and consistency in being a real team player," said Baltimore City Planning Director Thomas J. Stosur. "He would not only create the striking maps and graphics, but he would mount them professionally, advise on setup and display, transport the maps and supplies to meetings, set up the room, help out at the meeting, break down the room after the meeting, then go drinking with the rest of the team afterward!"
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
Baltimore's challenge challenge to the 2010 Census count netted the city a small population bump. Instead of being home to 620,961 people on April 1, 2010, as the U.S. Census Bureau reported in 2011, Baltimore actually had 621,074 residents - an increase of 113 people, federal records show. That's a far smaller increase than Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other Baltimore officials had hoped for. The city's planning department argued in its appeal that census workers did not count 15,635 housing units in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
U.S. 1 in Howard County gets you from Elkridge to Laurel, from the White Elk Motel to the Fat Daddy Saloon, with an array of industrial and office parks, homes, fast-food restaurants, storage places and gas stations in between. The strip is looking better in recent years, sprouting new developments with names like Elkridge Crossing, Howard Square and Ashbury Courts, but it's still a work in progress. The county's planning department has a vision of what that 11-mile stretch along Howard's eastern edge could be, and has included these notions in the proposed master plan for growth to be presented to the County Council for the first time Monday night.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
Baltimore County Council members are poised to adopt a lean spending plan that would achieve savings largely through early retirements and reorganizations in a number of government departments. The council made only one cut Thursday to the $1.65 billion operating budget County Executive Kevin Kamenetz recommended in April. Members trimmed the Department of Public Works' fuel budget for dump trucks and other equipment by about $208,000 because the county auditor found that the administration had overestimated the cost of fuel.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
Otis Rolley III, the first deputy housing commissioner in Baltimore, is a candidate for director of planning, a job that has been vacant since November, according to City Hall officials. Charles C. Graves III, who held the post for nine years, moved to Atlanta to become that city's director of planning and neighborhood development. Rolley "has been interviewed by the planning commission and by the mayor and is a candidate" for the planning director's job, said Raquel Guillory, a spokeswoman for the mayor.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 9, 2004
The Anne Arundel County planning department released yesterday a comprehensive series of proposed revisions to the county zoning code that would condense the code and standardize definitions, planning officials said. Officials expect to submit a similarly comprehensive revision of county subdivision rules in the spring. The zoning code was last fully revised in 1971. "It is my hope that this new legislation will make the zoning process more clear to the citizens and development community," said County Executive Janet S. Owens in a statement.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold is considering a move to overrule the recommendations of his own planning department, as he weighs a veto on a hard-fought bill that would allow a Pasadena apartment complex to move forward. The county's Office of Planning and Zoning recently recommended that the County Council approve intensified zoning for a property along Long Hill Road in Pasadena, where Annapolis-based development company Koch Homes plans to build 390 apartments.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
An east-side Baltimore County Council member expects the owners of a sprawling old warplane factory to seek rezoning of their property. A Towson lawyer will try for a third time for new zoning allowing a small office building. North county activists plan to study maps looking for environmentally sensitive areas that might need protection from development. The time has come to redraw the zoning map of a county that stretches from the Pennsylvania line to the Chesapeake Bay, 612 square miles of suburbia, urban centers, town main streets, farms and waterfront.
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