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NEWS
March 6, 1997
Wayne Schuster, a member of Freedom Area Community Planning Council, has accepted a job as director of planning and development for six state airports in Rhode Island. He will move to Providence next month."This was not an easy decision," Schuster said. "For whatever problems Carroll County has, it surely is a nice place to live."Schuster, 44, has volunteered his planning expertise to several community groups that have lobbied for slower growth, particularly in South Carroll."There is going to be growth," he said.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake today plans to introduce legislation to switch new city employees from the a traditional pension system to a 401(k)-style plan.  By implementing the switch, the city expects to save $1 million in fiscal year 2014, with increased savings each year until 2022, when city officials say they will save $7.8 million. Under the proposal, new city employees would be required to contribute 5 percent of their salaries to their retirement accounts, with the city contributing an additional 4 percent.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
William C. McDonnell, an urban planner who served as first executive director of the Green Spring-Worthington Valley Planning Council, died of lung cancer March 6 at his Stoneleigh residence. He was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Govans, Mr. McDonnell was a graduate of Towson Catholic High School. He was 17 when he enlisted in the Navy during the waning days of World War II and served as a radarman in the Pacific. After being discharged, he took advantage of the GI Bill and enrolled at Washington College in Chestertown, where he earned a bachelor's degree in political science in 1952.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
A developer's plan to build a $23 million school in Anne Arundel County in exchange for approval of a large-scale residential project got the green light from the Anne Arundel County Council last night. In the first step of the approval process, the council unanimously approved zoning for the Laurel project at its Monday night meeting. Councilman Jamie Benoit, who represents the Laurel area, said he reviewed the lease agreement between Severna Park-based Polm Cos. and Imagine Global Village Academy, and after making some amendments, was "satisfied" with it. Andrew Zois, president of Polm, said last night it was a "great victory.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
John C. Bernstein, director of the influential Valleys Planning Council, is leaving the Baltimore County land preservation group to head the Maryland Environmental Trust.Bernstein, 43, has led the council since Jan. 1, 1995, winning the respect of preservationists, farmers and the developers he often opposed."He did an excellent job," said lawyer G. Scott Barhight, who represents a project that is anathema to the Valleys Planning Council -- the development of a country club on the site of the historic Hayfields off Shawan Road.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1998
The vice chairman of the Freedom Area Community Planning Council has resigned, saying the group has lost its sense of purpose.Barry Marsh, on the council since its founding two years ago, quit the 13-member panel -- known as FACPAC -- April 15, the day 15,000 editions of the Freedom Fighter were published.The Eldersburg resident criticized the content of the panel's official publication, saying it was filled with personal attacks on county officials.The monthly paper was dedicated to the charter government issue.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 31, 2007
Richard Bayly Buck Jr., who as president and chairman of the Valleys Planning Council worked diligently for the preservation of the scenic Green Spring and Worthington valleys, died Saturday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 85. Mr. Buck was born in Baltimore and raised on Overhill Road in Roland Park. He was a 1940 graduate of Episcopal High School in Richmond, Va., and began his college studies at the University of Virginia. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army and served as a paratrooper with the 13th Airborne Division in France.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
J. John "Jack" Dillon, a longtime land preservationist who has spent decades saving Baltimore County's rural areas, is planning to step down as executive director of the Valleys Planning Council this year. Dillon said that after eight years running the influential land preservation group - and 42 years after he started working in county planning - it is time to move on. The planning council's board has started interviewing candidates for Dillon's replacement. "I think change is good," Dillon said of his decision.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
Cannot we create from a beautiful, natural landscape an environment inhabited by man in which natural beauty is retained? - Plan for the Valleys of Baltimore County, 1962 THAT pretty much sums up what we should be about here on this earth - peaceful co-existence between us and the plants and the animals, making room for people without trashing what attracted them. Sounds like a job for the Sierra Club. But it was a bunch of Baltimore businessmen, golfers and gentleman farmers who foresaw the coming sprawl.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2001
If J. Crew and Farm & Fleet ever combined their catalogs, Patrick A. Rodgers would be on the cover. Rodgers, a 23-year-old lacrosse player, wears chinos smeared with dirt and has hands caked with tractor grease. Soon to graduate from the University of Maryland, College Park, he's raising hay and 40 head of beef cattle in Green Spring Valley. At a time when land preservationists are looking for ways to pass their passion for rural life to their suburban-minded neighbors, Rodgers represents the bridge Green Spring Valley elders seek between what the valley was and what they hope it will become.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 31, 2007
Richard Bayly Buck Jr., who as president and chairman of the Valleys Planning Council worked diligently for the preservation of the scenic Green Spring and Worthington valleys, died Saturday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 85. Mr. Buck was born in Baltimore and raised on Overhill Road in Roland Park. He was a 1940 graduate of Episcopal High School in Richmond, Va., and began his college studies at the University of Virginia. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army and served as a paratrooper with the 13th Airborne Division in France.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
William C. McDonnell, an urban planner who served as first executive director of the Green Spring-Worthington Valley Planning Council, died of lung cancer March 6 at his Stoneleigh residence. He was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Govans, Mr. McDonnell was a graduate of Towson Catholic High School. He was 17 when he enlisted in the Navy during the waning days of World War II and served as a radarman in the Pacific. After being discharged, he took advantage of the GI Bill and enrolled at Washington College in Chestertown, where he earned a bachelor's degree in political science in 1952.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
Gavin Brooks stands at her easel, waiting for the cows to come out of the shade. Soon enough they do, but they're at her feet, sniffing her oil paints, apparently to see whether the tubes might taste good. And before she's finished mixing the colors for the tree-covered ridge across the meadow, a flock of chickens comes stampeding toward her. She has to laugh. She wanted nature. She's got it. The Towson artist is willing to travel across the country for these kinds of exchanges, for chickens and horses to sketch, for a view of an open field.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2005
Teresa A. Moore has a job to do in Towson: know everyone, be familiar with every development plan and zoning change request in a 75-square-mile area, coordinate regional environmental studies and keep money in the bank for legal fees that seem to multiply when you're trying to conserve open space in Baltimore County. Yet few know much about the challenges Moore faces as the new executive director of the Valleys Planning Council. Much of the negotiating is done before public zoning hearings are scheduled, before development plans are submitted, before most people in the Green Spring and Worthington valleys realize there's a threat to preservation efforts in the area, board members say. "It's not easy," says Richard B. Buck, chairman of the Valleys Planning Council board.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
Cannot we create from a beautiful, natural landscape an environment inhabited by man in which natural beauty is retained? - Plan for the Valleys of Baltimore County, 1962 THAT pretty much sums up what we should be about here on this earth - peaceful co-existence between us and the plants and the animals, making room for people without trashing what attracted them. Sounds like a job for the Sierra Club. But it was a bunch of Baltimore businessmen, golfers and gentleman farmers who foresaw the coming sprawl.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
J. John "Jack" Dillon, a longtime land preservationist who has spent decades saving Baltimore County's rural areas, is planning to step down as executive director of the Valleys Planning Council this year. Dillon said that after eight years running the influential land preservation group - and 42 years after he started working in county planning - it is time to move on. The planning council's board has started interviewing candidates for Dillon's replacement. "I think change is good," Dillon said of his decision.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2000
Kim Lane arrived in Baltimore with her Honda Civic stuffed with clothes and all the money she had in the world - $700 - in her pocket. She'd come from a small town in upstate New York and had never before seen a city the size of Baltimore. Being a civic-minded woman, Lane gravitated toward the neediest parts of Baltimore. A decade after landing here, she is devoted to one of the city's grittiest, poorest neighborhoods: Pigtown. She's known to colleagues as the Princess of Pigtown, a title she seems to have earned.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
A boarded-up, World War II-era apartment complex owned by the Army could be the site of the county's next community college campus if Edgewood community leaders have their way.But that plan seems to conflict with plans Harford County Housing Inc. has for the buildings.Edgewood Community Planning Council members are recommending that Washington Court, 39 acres on Cedar Lane, become a satellite campus of Harford Community College.The Army is declaring the property surplus and may turn it over to the county.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2004
The developer of a planned seven-story apartment building in Remington is fighting a court-ordered freeze on the $7 million project on Cresmont Avenue that a Baltimore judge ruled was illegally approved by the city. City Circuit Judge Albert J. Matricciani Jr. ruled recently that construction could not continue without specific city legislation to build a 33-space surface parking lot next to the proposed apartment building. That ruling surprised Orchard Development LLC, which had obtained a city permit to move ahead and had begun work at the site.
NEWS
September 22, 2003
The Finksburg Planning Area Council will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday at Sandy Mount United Methodist Church. The agenda will include the final report from the Maryland Department of the Environment on the source of water contamination on Suffolk Road; the proposed Finksburg library; volunteers for a proposed county committee on scenic issues; and a potential new scorecard for the commissioners. All Finksburg-area residents and business owners and guests are welcome. The church is at 2101 Old Westminster Pike.
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