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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 30, 2006
Franz Josef Vidor, a retired city planning and housing official who helped oversee Baltimore's urban renewal efforts 35 years ago, died of lung disease Tuesday at St. Agnes Hospital. A resident of the Charlestown retirement community, he was 87. Born in Vienna, Austria, he studied at the Vienna Technical College for a year. In a biographical sketch he prepared, Mr. Vidor said he believed in "individual freedom" and left Austria at 19 for England after his home country had been annexed by Nazi Germany.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
Josephine C. "Jo" Miller, a civic activist who was a member of the League of Women Voters for 50 years and a Baltimore City Zoning Board watchdog for the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, died March 22 of esophageal cancer at her Roland Park Place home. She was 84. The daughter of J. William Carlson, an electrical engineer, and Isabelle Young Carlson, a homemaker, the former Josephine Lois Carlson was born and raised in Kearny, N.J. After graduating in 1947 from Kearny High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1951 from Wilson College in Chambersburg, Pa. She moved to Baltimore after college when she took a job as a research assistant at the James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
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NEWS
June 17, 1996
The Real Estate Watch column in the Real Estate section of yesterday's editions gave an incorrect date for a meeting of the Baltimore Campaign, an initiative to promote the city that is coordinated by the Citizens Planning and Housing Association.The meeting is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 10: 30 a.m. July 18 at the Baltimore Urban League.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/17/96
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 17, 2009
Marjorie Gordon, a former president of a paper box manufacturing business who was active in numerous civic organizations, died of pancreatic cancer Aug. 5 at her north Baltimore home. She was 80. Born Marjorie Jane Chor in Baltimore, she was a 1946 graduate of Forest Park High School and attended the Women's College of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before earning a philosophy degree at Goucher College. She received a master's degree in education from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
A panel discussion on notable developments in the Baltimore area will be part of the 65th annual meeting of the nonprofit Citizens Planning and Housing Association. The event - to be held from 5:15 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Wednesday at Gutierrez Studio, 2010 Clipper Park Road, in the new Clipper Mill development - will highlight the location's redevelopment of old mill buildings into new homes, offices and artist space near the Woodberry light rail station. Food and drink from restaurants along the light rail line will be served.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | December 21, 1991
Boisclair Advertising Inc., which owns hundreds of illegal billboards around Baltimore, has decided not to appeal a court ruling ordering it to remove the signs.Leaders in the predominantly low-income, black neighborhoods where most of the billboards are found have long protested them, saying they are eyesores and undermine community values by glorifying liquor and cigarettes."Great!" Sylvia D. Fulwood, director of East Baltimore Midway/Barclay Community Organization, said yesterday. "This means they have to come down."
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | December 21, 1991
Boisclair Advertising Inc., which owns hundreds of illegal billboards around Baltimore, has decided not to appeal a court ruling ordering it to remove the signs.Leaders in the predominantly low-income, black neighborhoods where most of the billboards are found have long protested them, saying they are eyesores and undermine community values by glorifying liquor and cigarettes."Great!" Sylvia D. Fulwood, director of East Baltimore Midway/Barclay Community Organization, said yesterday. "This means they have to come down."
BUSINESS
June 23, 1991
HOUSING FORUMSCPHA offers program on development issuesThe Citizens Planning and Housing Association will hold a forum on "Community Development," the second in a series on "Housing for the '90s," from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday at the Robert Coleman Elementary School, 2400 Windsor Ave.The forum will feature Robert Hill and Elva Tillman of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University. Amy Glorioso, a city planner with Baltimore's Department of Housing and Community Development, will be the closing speaker.
NEWS
By Ryan Clark and Ryan Clark,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2001
The Morris Goldseker Foundation of Maryland Inc. has issued 24 new grants, totaling about $1,150,000, to local and statewide organizations ranging from the Citizens Planning and Housing Association to Women Entrepreneurs of Baltimore Inc. Timothy D. Armbruster, president of the foundation, said that the foundation wanted to donate larger sums to a smaller number of Baltimore neighborhoods. The foundation also wanted to make donations specifically to help nonprofit organizations better themselves by, for example, hiring new management or improving technology.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1991
HOUSING FORUMSPlanning group offers series on '90s housing"Housing for the '90s" will be explored in a series of forums sponsored by the Citizens Planning and Housing Association. Each forum will include talks and panel discussions by city officials and community experts.The first forum, "Code Enforcement and Vacant Housing," will be held Saturday. It features John Huppert and Bob Dengler from Baltimore's housing inspection agency. The forum will include a panel discussion on code enforcement and alternatives to enforcement.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2007
They went from a parking garage in Owings Mills to a mall in Northwest Baltimore to an eco-friendly, upscale development in Hampden. The sites, vastly different in character and location, all had one common element: a transit stop, be it a Metro subway or light rail station. That was the ultimate theme of a tour sponsored yesterday by the Citizens Planning and Housing Association. More than 50 people walked around six transit stations that are sites for redevelopment projects in various stages, taking public transportation to reach each destination.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 30, 2006
Franz Josef Vidor, a retired city planning and housing official who helped oversee Baltimore's urban renewal efforts 35 years ago, died of lung disease Tuesday at St. Agnes Hospital. A resident of the Charlestown retirement community, he was 87. Born in Vienna, Austria, he studied at the Vienna Technical College for a year. In a biographical sketch he prepared, Mr. Vidor said he believed in "individual freedom" and left Austria at 19 for England after his home country had been annexed by Nazi Germany.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
A panel discussion on notable developments in the Baltimore area will be part of the 65th annual meeting of the nonprofit Citizens Planning and Housing Association. The event - to be held from 5:15 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Wednesday at Gutierrez Studio, 2010 Clipper Park Road, in the new Clipper Mill development - will highlight the location's redevelopment of old mill buildings into new homes, offices and artist space near the Woodberry light rail station. Food and drink from restaurants along the light rail line will be served.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | October 5, 2006
Joyce Smith, who owns a house in Baltimore's Franklin Square neighborhood, has watched her daughter, a 29-year-old professional and single mother, search in earnest for a home in the city. She recently checked out a house in the 1700 block of W. Lombard St., and the price sent her reeling: $275,000. "Why should my granddaughter have to move outside the Beltway and not be able to spend a night at her grandmother's house?" Smith asked last night at a City Council hearing on affordable housing.
NEWS
May 26, 2003
WITH SEVERAL suburban counties about to impose limits on residential building, land in Baltimore's depopulating neighborhoods could offer tempting redevelopment opportunities -- if the city plays its cards right. This is why it is mystifying that Mayor Martin O'Malley apparently wants to further weaken the planning department -- which has been without a permanent director since November -- by transferring six community planners. They will go to the housing department, which is hoping to extend its development capacity beyond its traditional responsibility of designated urban renewal areas.
NEWS
August 14, 2002
Edward A. Supplee Sr., 81, bank vice president Edward Arthurs Supplee Sr., a retired Mercantile-Safe Deposit and Trust Co. vice president who had been an influential member of the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, died of heart failure Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Roland Park resident was 81. Born and raised in Guilford, Mr. Supplee was a 1939 graduate of Gilman School. After earning his bachelor's degree in Latin from Princeton University in 1943, he served with an Army artillery company in the Pacific and also in the occupation of Japan.
NEWS
August 14, 2002
Edward A. Supplee Sr., 81, bank vice president Edward Arthurs Supplee Sr., a retired Mercantile-Safe Deposit and Trust Co. vice president who had been an influential member of the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, died of heart failure Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Roland Park resident was 81. Born and raised in Guilford, Mr. Supplee was a 1939 graduate of Gilman School. After earning his bachelor's degree in Latin from Princeton University in 1943, he served with an Army artillery company in the Pacific and also in the occupation of Japan.
NEWS
By Ryan Clark and Ryan Clark,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2001
The Morris Goldseker Foundation of Maryland Inc. has issued 24 new grants, totaling about $1,150,000, to local and statewide organizations ranging from the Citizens Planning and Housing Association to Women Entrepreneurs of Baltimore Inc. Timothy D. Armbruster, president of the foundation, said that the foundation wanted to donate larger sums to a smaller number of Baltimore neighborhoods. The foundation also wanted to make donations specifically to help nonprofit organizations better themselves by, for example, hiring new management or improving technology.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2000
Baltimore County's ambitious vision for revitalizing long-neglected neighborhoods is drawing criticism from housing activists troubled by its apparent exclusion of the poor. Hoping to spur economic growth in areas bypassed by the current economic boom, Baltimore County is seeking the power to condemn property across large swaths of Essex-Middle River, Dundalk and Randallstown. In each neighborhood, the county plans to obtain and clear land, then look for developers to build upscale homes, offices, stores and restaurants.
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