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NEWS
By Edward Gunts | March 29, 1992
Whatever is in the details of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Janet Marie Smith probably helped put it there.As the Orioles' vice president for stadium planning and development -- one of the first women in the country to hold such a position -- the 34-year-old Mississippi native and avid baseball fan has served since January 1989 as the liaison among the ballclub, the Maryland Stadium Authority and the project architect, HOK Sports Facilities Group.Taking her lead from Orioles majority owner Eli Jacobs and president Larry Lucchino, Smith has been instrumental in many of the major and minor decisions that effect the ballpark's look and feel, from the use of steel trusses rather than concrete for the upper deck to development of an "intimacy index" for the seating to making sure the Orioles weather vanes atop the scoreboard are "ornithologically correct."
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NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | December 12, 2007
An executive with nearly 20 years of experience in planning and development has replaced a veteran Rouse Co. vice president in heading up downtown development in Columbia, General Growth Properties Inc. announced this week. Gregory F. Hamm, 45, has become regional vice president and general manager of Columbia, taking over for Douglas M. Godine, who has served as first vice president, development, with responsibility for Columbia, since March of last year. "I look forward to learning Columbia," said Hamm, who has been a consultant for General Growth and has had an office in Columbia for more than a year.
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NEWS
May 13, 1998
Carroll County planners are looking for ways to shorten the development-review process to make it easier for developers to build a home, subdivision or business.County officials hope to trim three or four weeks from the seven months it usually takes to process development applications, Philip J. Rovang, county planning and development director, told County Commissioners yesterday.The time period is the same as for other counties in the metropolitan area, he said.County officials hope to speed up the approval of public works agreements, which are legal agreements between developers and the county that guarantee construction of such things as utilities, roads and sidewalks.
NEWS
May 18, 2007
Comic book program a disservice to pupils State schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick must be the cleverest bureaucrat of all time. Her plan to encourage the use of comic books as part of the reading program in Maryland's classrooms ("Grasmick urges expanded use of comics in reading," May 3) will have parents of means enrolling their children in private schools in droves, allowing her to cut thousands of dollars from the state's education budget. Never mind that the pilot study "did not look at whether comic books helped children learn to read" - "teachers and students were satisfied."
NEWS
March 6, 1997
Wayne Schuster, a member of Freedom Area Community Planning Council, has accepted a job as director of planning and development for six state airports in Rhode Island. He will move to Providence next month."This was not an easy decision," Schuster said. "For whatever problems Carroll County has, it surely is a nice place to live."Schuster, 44, has volunteered his planning expertise to several community groups that have lobbied for slower growth, particularly in South Carroll."There is going to be growth," he said.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
Saying they wanted to make sure that the county's rapid development doesn't collide with its long-range master plan, Carroll's commissioners yesterday announced a shuffling of duties among top administrators.The reorganization eliminates one county department, consolidates two more and calls for no raises, firings or additional staff, the commissioners said.The biggest change involves the closing of the Department of General Services, which was headed by J. Michael Evans. Mr. Evans -- who, at a salary of $70,473, earns more than anyone in county government -- will become director of the Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
The planning commission should give special treatment to Finksburg and unincorporated South Carroll when guiding development in those areas, Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown said yesterday.Eight of Carroll's community planning areas "have town governments involved both in crafting the plan for their areas and in overseeing its implementation," Brown said.But the Finksburg and Freedom planning areas "are lacking in that regard," he said in a memorandum to the planning commission.Residents there "are more likely to feel powerless and at risk" when growth decisions are made on their behalf, he said.
NEWS
October 27, 1996
County planners consistent on new post officeI am writing in response to an article that appeared in the Oct. 6 edition of The Sun in Carroll titled "Red Light for Post Office Proposal," because of comments made by the Post Office representatives.To our surprise, the Post Office claimed that the Carroll County Department of Planning and Development told it one thing, then changed its mind and told it the opposite concerning future location of the Eldersburg Post Office.First, it is important to note that the planning bureau has supported the need for an expanded post office in the Freedom area.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | September 11, 1991
County and town officials take the next step in the arduous process of shaping Carroll's future Saturday at the second Town-County Partnership Conference.The all-day session beginning at 9 a.m. at Carroll Community College will feature reports on infrastructure, affordable housing and agricultural preservation, presentations by two planning and development design experts and a discussion of police protection in the county. About 90 participants are expected.The conference is a follow-up to the first summit between municipal and county leaders last December.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Seeking to control growth while addressing environmental concerns near the creeks that flow into the Chesapeake Bay, officials in Baltimore County are putting the final touches on a plan that would limit sewer hookups on the Bowleys Quarters and Back River Neck peninsulas.The proposal, to be presented next week to the county planning board, would call for hookups to be restricted largely to existing homes and to neighboring lots with vested development rights, officials said yesterday.The board, an advisory panel, would submit a proposal to the County Council, which last month imposed a four-month moratorium on sewer hookups on the peninsulas.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
On a peninsula where aging "shore shacks" line Middle River, a developer is proposing an upscale village of townhouses and condominiums as part of Baltimore County's ambitious waterfront revitalization. Clark Turner, president of Harford County-based Clark Turner Cos., said he has entered into an agreement to buy a 1 1/2 -mile stretch of waterfront property in Middle River for his project, which would adjoin Hopewell Pointe, another waterfront residential project, which is to include a restaurant and a marina.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | July 1, 2002
Baltimore's former Allied Signal chrome plant property has been off limits to the general public for more than a century, but that's about to change. With work complete on a $100 million cleanup of the 27-acre parcel between the Inner Harbor and Fells Point, developers are beginning to look for ways to bring people onto the land temporarily so they can see its potential for redevelopment as a mixed-use community called Harbor Point. One idea is to hold events on the property to showcase its central location and waterfront views.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2001
On a recent Tuesday, Robert A. Hoffman appeared before the Baltimore County Board of Appeals, urging members to approve plans by his client - Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church - to build a $10 million sanctuary in a small community on the county's west side. The next night, the Towson attorney with the trademark bow tie attended a community meeting in Oella, representing a developer who wants to turn historic Oella Mills into 177 luxury apartments. Days later, Hoffman, a lawyer with the firm of Venable, Baetjer and Howard, fielded questions from a reporter about a client who had proposed building a high-rise retirement community near downtown Towson.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Seeking to control growth while addressing environmental concerns near the creeks that flow into the Chesapeake Bay, officials in Baltimore County are putting the final touches on a plan that would limit sewer hookups on the Bowleys Quarters and Back River Neck peninsulas.The proposal, to be presented next week to the county planning board, would call for hookups to be restricted largely to existing homes and to neighboring lots with vested development rights, officials said yesterday.The board, an advisory panel, would submit a proposal to the County Council, which last month imposed a four-month moratorium on sewer hookups on the peninsulas.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
The planning commission should give special treatment to Finksburg and unincorporated South Carroll when guiding development in those areas, Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown said yesterday.Eight of Carroll's community planning areas "have town governments involved both in crafting the plan for their areas and in overseeing its implementation," Brown said.But the Finksburg and Freedom planning areas "are lacking in that regard," he said in a memorandum to the planning commission.Residents there "are more likely to feel powerless and at risk" when growth decisions are made on their behalf, he said.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1998
If you want to open a snowball stand or build a Wal-Mart in Carroll County, the development procedure is the same: long and often tedious.Both businesses must navigate a bureaucratic labyrinth of county and state agencies dealing with health, soil conservation, engineering, safety and environmental concerns. Both must appear before county boards and committees. And both could pay thousands of dollars in legal expenses and county fees.It can take six to 12 months for final approval.The County Commissioners will consider today whether to change this one-size-fits-all policy, allowing smaller businesses to take a short cut through the county's site development review process.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1998
If you want to open a snowball stand or build a Wal-Mart in Carroll County, the development procedure is the same: long and often tedious.Both businesses must navigate a bureaucratic labyrinth of county and state agencies dealing with health, soil conservation, engineering, safety and environmental concerns. Both must appear before county boards and committees. And both could pay thousands of dollars in legal expenses and county fees.It can take six to 12 months for final approval.The County Commissioners will consider today whether to change this one-size-fits-all policy, allowing smaller businesses to take a short cut through the county's site development review process.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | December 12, 2007
An executive with nearly 20 years of experience in planning and development has replaced a veteran Rouse Co. vice president in heading up downtown development in Columbia, General Growth Properties Inc. announced this week. Gregory F. Hamm, 45, has become regional vice president and general manager of Columbia, taking over for Douglas M. Godine, who has served as first vice president, development, with responsibility for Columbia, since March of last year. "I look forward to learning Columbia," said Hamm, who has been a consultant for General Growth and has had an office in Columbia for more than a year.
NEWS
May 13, 1998
Carroll County planners are looking for ways to shorten the development-review process to make it easier for developers to build a home, subdivision or business.County officials hope to trim three or four weeks from the seven months it usually takes to process development applications, Philip J. Rovang, county planning and development director, told County Commissioners yesterday.The time period is the same as for other counties in the metropolitan area, he said.County officials hope to speed up the approval of public works agreements, which are legal agreements between developers and the county that guarantee construction of such things as utilities, roads and sidewalks.
NEWS
March 6, 1997
Wayne Schuster, a member of Freedom Area Community Planning Council, has accepted a job as director of planning and development for six state airports in Rhode Island. He will move to Providence next month."This was not an easy decision," Schuster said. "For whatever problems Carroll County has, it surely is a nice place to live."Schuster, 44, has volunteered his planning expertise to several community groups that have lobbied for slower growth, particularly in South Carroll."There is going to be growth," he said.
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