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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | September 28, 1990
The Baltimore Planning Commission has approved a plan designed to breathe new life into a 40-year-old shopping center on Cold Spring Lane.The commission yesterday approved a planned unit development program designed to give the owners of the Cold Spring Shopping Center more flexibility in leasing their 24,000-square-foot center.Under the plan, businesses such as bicycle-repair shops, photocopying services, post offices, clothing stores, jewelry stores and offices could lease space in the center at 1401-1415 E. Cold Spring Lane.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Baltimore County Council members on Monday approved preliminary plans for three residential developments: two senior-housing projects in the county's southwestern corner and a townhouse project in North Point. The council unanimously signed off on "planned unit development" proposals for the projects. The designation lets developers build more densely than they would under regular zoning rules, on the condition that their project offer some community benefit. Such projects require County Council approval before local planning officials review them.
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NEWS
October 7, 2002
SOME NEIGHBORS are upset about plans to convert Bonnie View Golf Course into 595 homes. And no wonder. If the expanse is developed, Mount Washington and Pikesville will lose a buffer of greenery, and traffic on narrow Smith Avenue will intensify. The golf course has been sold. The question is not whether something will be built there but what, how and when. That's why Baltimore County, where most of the land is located, and the city should coordinate their approval processes. Even though it would be virtually unprecedented, the two jurisdictions should combine public hearings on Beazer Homes' proposal.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
The Baltimore County Council is poised make it easier to get information about plans filed under a real estate development method that has been criticized as too easy on builders and too hard on residents trying to keep track of what's going on in their neighborhoods. A bill before the council would reform the planned unit development (PUD) process, which allows developers to depart from underlying zoning by providing a community benefit to go along with their projects. Members are expected to vote Tuesday to require that preliminary plans be posted on the county website before developers meet with community members and before agencies have begun their first review of the project.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | February 21, 2007
A Pikesville developer is moving forward with plans to build 144 high-end townhouses on a waterfront parcel in eastern Baltimore County. Mark C. Sapperstein won County Council approval last night to submit the project as a "planned unit development." The designation, while subjecting the plans to public hearings, allows Sapperstein to break some zoning rules if the project is determined to benefit the community. Early plans call for clusters of six "villa-style" townhomes built on 37 acres on what once was Bauer's Farm in Edgemere.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
More than 300 Pikesville residents packed an emotional hearing before the Baltimore County Planning Board last night on plans for a 152-unit housing project for the elderly proposed by Beth Tfiloh Synagogue.The vast majority in the standing-room crowd were opposed to )) the project, which they viewed as out of place in their neighborhoods of single-family homes and feared would significantly increase traffic.The project, Beth Tfiloh at Old Court, is under review as a planned unit development -- a classification giving the Planning Board final authority on approval, and precluding appeals.
NEWS
December 23, 1993
A Silver Spring developer is proposing to build 291 homes off Route 3 in Gambrills on the same site where the county's Board of Appeals rejected a 722-home planned unit development last year.Crofton Farms Development Corp. plans to build townhouses and single-family homes on 72 acres near Waugh Chapel Road. A hearing has been scheduled for Jan. 20.Last year, three developers who owned 221 acres formed a partnership and tried to develop the site under one plan. But the Board of Appeals agreed with neighboring residents that the developers could not meet standards for roads, schools and sewer service.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | March 23, 2009
The number of residences proposed to be built on the last large parcel of developable land in Owings Mills has decreased by more than 100 now that Baltimore County has requested an elementary school site on the property. Plans for Plinlimmon Farms had included 330 townhouses, 430 condominiums and a retail and office complex on 104 acres along Lyons Mill Road near Lyonswood Drive in New Town. The same parcel had been zoned for 430 detached homes. The County Council approved the project as a planned-unit development about 18 months ago, eliminating some zoning requirements.
NEWS
January 8, 2009
Zoning rules permit PUD for care center A recent letter regarding the Keswick Multi-Care Center's proposal for the Baltimore Country Club property misrepresents the zoning aspects of the proposal ("Roland Park proposal imperils zoning code," Jan. 5). Keswick's plan for its continuing-care community would require the City Council to approve a planned unit development (PUD) ordinance for the property but would not require the area's existing R-1 zoning to be changed. The R-1 zoning category was not designed as an exclusive single-family enclave but, in fact, expressly permits such nonresidential uses as schools, museums, community recreation centers and religious institutions.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
The Baltimore County Council unanimously approved last night a little-heralded bill that is viewed as vitally important to the preservation of the county's older, urbanized commercial areas.The measure, a commercial Planned Unit Development (PUD) law, will allow redevelopment of many commercial areas without the long, expensive rezoning process that occurs only once every four years.For example, an investor wanting to build a restaurant on land zoned for light industry where an abandoned gas station sits can do it without getting a zoning change.
EXPLORE
November 2, 2011
Neighborspace and Catonsville Rails To Trails are both great organizations. However, allowing developers to make donations to side step planned unit development requirements is wrong, no matter the organization's merit. The Catonsville Times was correct ("PUD benefits should remain specific to project's location," CatonsvilleTimes, Oct. 5) in stating, "Quirk's bill could turn a PUD request into a pay to play deal. " Opponents to Whalen Properties' medical building PUD feel that dealing with traffic increases, building sidewalks to the Beltway and noise remediation from the possibility of 24-hour ambulance services aren't meaningful community benefits.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
The Baltimore County Council managed to wring something of real value from an ugly confrontation over a townhouse development in Catonsville on Monday night when it agreed to an amendment adding meaningful community input and professional analysis to the planned unit development process. PUDs are meant to allow the construction of high-quality projects that benefit the community even if they don't conform to traditional zoning rules, but community leaders increasingly see them as a way for politically connected developers to skirt the law. The proposal introduced Monday by Councilman David Marks, a Perry Hall-Towson Republican, and adopted 6-1, requires a community input meeting and initial analysis by county agencies before a council member introduces a resolution authorizing the formal consideration of a PUD proposal, and that is unquestionably an improvement.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
If you were to guess that a resolution with the title "Revoking prior approval of PUD — Thistle Landing" had something to do with revoking the prior approval of a PUD, or planned unit development, called "Thistle Landing," you are, apparently, overqualified to serve on the Baltimore County Council. Last month, Councilman Tom Quirk, a freshman lawmaker from Catonsville, introduced that resolution on the night of a council meeting, and his colleagues unanimously approved it. Now some of them, including the two most senior members of the council, are saying they didn't realize what they were doing at the time and introduced a new bill, officially to "clarify" the PUD process, but in practice to revoke the revocation.
NEWS
January 31, 2011
For all the Job-like travails residents of Cockeysville and Timonium had to endure last week, from the heavy snows and school closings to power outages and a particularly ill-timed water main break, the one that evoked the most anxiety can be expressed in three letters — P-U-D. It was a hardship not sent from the heavens but from a Catonsville developer. A PUD or Planned United Development refers to a regulatory mechanism that allows a builder to essentially sidestep the normal zoning process in order to provide innovative development, the parameters of which can be negotiated with local residents.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | March 23, 2009
The number of residences proposed to be built on the last large parcel of developable land in Owings Mills has decreased by more than 100 now that Baltimore County has requested an elementary school site on the property. Plans for Plinlimmon Farms had included 330 townhouses, 430 condominiums and a retail and office complex on 104 acres along Lyons Mill Road near Lyonswood Drive in New Town. The same parcel had been zoned for 430 detached homes. The County Council approved the project as a planned-unit development about 18 months ago, eliminating some zoning requirements.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | February 18, 2009
Baltimore County Council members authorized the creation of a master plan to guide development of a state hospital property in Owings Mills last night, saying they want the document in place before the Rosewood Center is made available for development. The state announced in December 2007 its plans to close the hospital for the severely disabled. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been relocating the remaining nearly 150 patients to community placements and will shutter the facility July 1. After its review, the state will likely declare as surplus the nearly 225-acre property near Reisterstown Road and begin accepting proposals from the public and private sectors for its use. Rosewood, which opened in 1888, housed nearly 3,700 people at its peak.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | September 21, 1993
A developer has sown the seeds of a 448-home "planned unit" development where the Schramm family once raised turkeys in Pasadena.Kevin Lusby of Koch Associates Inc. said yesterday that his firm has a contract to purchase the last farm in the highly developed Mountain Road corridor and has asked the county to rezone the property for higher-density development.The developer has proposed building 192 townhouses and 256 detached, single-family homes on 205 acres, said Kevin Dooley, a planner with the county Department of Planning and Code Enforcement.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1990
Gary Hosey of Millersville isn't opposed to the prospect of 752 new houses, apartments and town homes a half-mile away -- yet."I'm not opposed to it," Hosey, a retired naval officer who lives in Baldwin Hills, said Wednesday. "I am concerned."So concerned is Hosey, in fact, that he has organized a public meeting, scheduled Jan. 7, where citizens can find out more about what is planned for the 221 acres between St. Stephen's Church Road, Route 3 and Crofton Village before developers take their request for a special zoning exception to county officials.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | February 17, 2009
New energy-efficient, single-family homes could soon fill the site of a demolished apartment complex in the heart of Dundalk. The Baltimore County Council is expected to review plans tonight for the 66-home, planned unit development of Yorkway that officials and community groups are hailing for its potential to revitalize and enhance the once-blighted area. "We are going from blocks of run-down homes that generated as many as 3,000 police calls a year," said Councilman John Olszewski Sr., who represents the district and will introduce the resolution tonight.
NEWS
January 8, 2009
Zoning rules permit PUD for care center A recent letter regarding the Keswick Multi-Care Center's proposal for the Baltimore Country Club property misrepresents the zoning aspects of the proposal ("Roland Park proposal imperils zoning code," Jan. 5). Keswick's plan for its continuing-care community would require the City Council to approve a planned unit development (PUD) ordinance for the property but would not require the area's existing R-1 zoning to be changed. The R-1 zoning category was not designed as an exclusive single-family enclave but, in fact, expressly permits such nonresidential uses as schools, museums, community recreation centers and religious institutions.
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