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By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 15, 1992
ABERDEEN -- Dave Duchon stood in the middle of the dim room where students come to study the stars and planets and shook his head in disbelief.Mr. Duchon, the planetarium director at Aberdeen High School, pointed to dents in the domed metal ceiling, left by slide projectors hurled into the air, and the console panel, where a reel-to-reel tape recorder, ripped from its casing, dangled by an electrical cord.The star projector, a delicate piece of machinery that formed the heart of the planetarium at the school, wobbled on its platform, its wires torn out, its globe dented by a baseball bat or a fire extinguisher.
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NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Sun Reporter // Weather Blogger | March 26, 2010
S pace Cadets! See stars Saturday night at Towson University. At 8 p.m. in Smith Hall, the school's Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences celebrates the opening of its new planetarium and telescope facility. Enjoy planetarium shows and, weather permitting, a look through TU's new telescope. Hear a talk by NASA astrophysicist John Mather , winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics, "From the Big Bang to Life and the End of the Universe." That covers just about everything.
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NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | October 4, 1992
The planetarium at Aberdeen High School, which was virtually destroyed by vandals in August, probably won't be ready for use this school year because of the time needed to replace or repair the damaged equipment.That means some Harford students, mostly middle and high school youngsters, will not be able to attend planetarium classes this year.Dave Duchon, planetarium director for Aberdeen High School and Edgewood Middle School, said he is scheduling as many students as possible into the Edgewood planetarium.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2005
"I see it!" "There it is!!" Inside the darkened planetarium at Aberdeen High School, the kindergartners found the sun as it crossed the horizon and began rising from the east. Gradually, the small room brightened, the stars scattered across the domed ceiling began to fade, and the 30-minute lesson came to an end. "Whether you know it or not, you were being scientists today," the planetarium's director, Greg Plotycia, told the children from two kindergarten classes at Church Creek Elementary School in Belcamp.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
What to do with a used 19-foot-tall planetarium?That's the question being asked these days about the Howard County school system's last relic of the 1960s space race.The county used to have two planetariums, but no one seems to know what happened to the other. School officials figure the missing one is either buried in a county landfill or sitting in someone's attic. It would cost about $200,000 to replace it today.As for the last existing planetarium -- a dome and specialized projection system -- school officials are divided as to whether it ought to be saved for future astronomy lessons or simply thrown away.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2001
In Fred Hickok's classroom, a day passes in 20 seconds, a year in 80 seconds. As associate professor of astronomy at the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County, Hickok is also the caretaker of the school's Benjamin Banneker Planetarium, which has a new $312,000 projection system allowing students to study the cosmos through dozens of computer-generated programs that will combine music with celestial ceiling maps. The planetarium is used as a classroom for college students studying astronomy and also serves as a field trip attraction for students from area elementary, middle and high schools.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | September 11, 1993
There it was, just as promised, hanging in the southwestern sky: a point of light that didn't move as the stars and planets swung slowly across their nightly arc.But the folks at the Maryland Science Center planned to take that "star" out of the heavens by the time Starlab opens to public viewings this weekend.The unusual glowing object, seen during a demonstration last week, was actually a tiny puncture in the dome of a portable planetarium featured in "Starlab Weekend" at the Inner Harbor facility.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
Howard County's last planetarium won't be going to Centennial High School, but it may not get thrown away, either.The Howard County school board Thursday night denied a request by Centennial High School's science faculty to put the planetarium in the Ellicott City school, but left open the possibility that the dome could be installed elsewhere in the county."
NEWS
November 15, 1995
HERE'S A PROPOSAL for the Howard school system: Every school that wants to get the vintage 1960s planetarium that is soon to be removed from Wilde Lake Middle should start a fund-raiser. Parents and teachers can get together and hold drives, and the school that raises the most money wins. This would be a fair, and ultimately cheaper, way of disposing of the planetarium while simultaneously fostering school spirit.What school officials should not consider is using public dollars to remove the planetarium from Wilde Lake Middle and transfer it to Centennial High.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2005
"I see it!" "There it is!!" Inside the darkened planetarium at Aberdeen High School, the kindergartners found the sun as it crossed the horizon and began rising from the east. Gradually, the small room brightened, the stars scattered across the domed ceiling began to fade, and the 30-minute lesson came to an end. "Whether you know it or not, you were being scientists today," the planetarium's director, Greg Plotycia, told the children from two kindergarten classes at Church Creek Elementary School in Belcamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | December 16, 2004
Where: Montgomery College Planetarium on Takoma Park campus. It is adjacent to the Science South Building on Fenton Street. Directions are on the school's Web site. See Web address in last column. When: 8 p.m. Saturday. Why: Hear live jazz by Mind Over Matter/Music Over Mind as you sit back in the planetarium seats and watch the night sky projected on the dome above. There will also be a laser show coordinated with the music. The event is free. Information: Call Dr. Harold Williams at 301-650-1463 or visit www.montgomerycollege.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2004
Jasmyn Watkins is ready to do her part for the space initiative President Bush announced last week. Inspired by the portable planetarium now inflated in her Featherbed Lane Elementary School gymnasium - as well as the astronauts who came to her school yesterday to celebrate it - the second-grader explained why she, too, is ready to don a spacesuit. "Because you can go up to space and see all the stars," Jasmyn, 7, said as she stood at the structure's tunnel-like entrance. Her reaction is what Baltimore County public school officials were hoping for when they purchased two $17,770 inflatable Starlabs, the county's newest astronomy and science teaching tools.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
A West Baltimore neighborhood group's dream of transforming an obsolete 19th-century water tower into a useful educational tool for children received a big boost yesterday from a high place - Congress. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, of Baltimore, presented the West Arlington Improvement Association of Baltimore City Inc. with a $436,950 grant - money that is meant to jump-start the reconstruction effort. Plans for the $4 million project include transforming the defunct 120-foot West Arlington water tower into a planetarium and building a youth center at its base.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2001
In Fred Hickok's classroom, a day passes in 20 seconds, a year in 80 seconds. As associate professor of astronomy at the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County, Hickok is also the caretaker of the school's Benjamin Banneker Planetarium, which has a new $312,000 projection system allowing students to study the cosmos through dozens of computer-generated programs that will combine music with celestial ceiling maps. The planetarium is used as a classroom for college students studying astronomy and also serves as a field trip attraction for students from area elementary, middle and high schools.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 18, 2000
NEW YORK -- On the Upper West Side of Manhattan, a remarkable new museum has been fashioned from the simplest of geometrical forms. Its exterior is a 12-story-high cube, with two outer walls made of colorless glass. Centered inside, as if it's floating on air, is a white aluminum sphere, 87 feet in diameter. The glass is so clear and the sphere is so large and luminous, especially at night, that it practically forces people to stop and look inside. The building is the Rose Center for Earth and Science, a $210 million exploratorium that opens tomorrow as the latest addition to the American Museum of Natural History.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Young Chang and Young Chang,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
Spend a summer evening on the moon, on Jupiter, in the sprays of a meteor shower, anywhere but Earth. With recent afternoon temperatures reaching the highest summer's yet seen, it makes sense to stay indoors during the day and venture out at night.Go out with a telescope, or out to an environment simulating night, such as a planetarium, or out to an observatory. Local stargazing clubs offer opportunities to talk stars, and locations such as the Maryland Science Center, the Harford County Observatory and the Goddard Space Flight Center have plenty of astronomical fun.At the Maryland Science Center's Davis Planetarium, for example, the effect is almost three-dimensional.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
A West Baltimore neighborhood group's dream of transforming an obsolete 19th-century water tower into a useful educational tool for children received a big boost yesterday from a high place - Congress. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, of Baltimore, presented the West Arlington Improvement Association of Baltimore City Inc. with a $436,950 grant - money that is meant to jump-start the reconstruction effort. Plans for the $4 million project include transforming the defunct 120-foot West Arlington water tower into a planetarium and building a youth center at its base.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Sun Reporter // Weather Blogger | March 26, 2010
S pace Cadets! See stars Saturday night at Towson University. At 8 p.m. in Smith Hall, the school's Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences celebrates the opening of its new planetarium and telescope facility. Enjoy planetarium shows and, weather permitting, a look through TU's new telescope. Hear a talk by NASA astrophysicist John Mather , winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics, "From the Big Bang to Life and the End of the Universe." That covers just about everything.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1997
TICKLE ME ELMO, pogo sticks and Cabbage Patch Dolls -- each year we watch hot gifts ride in and out on the wave of Christmas commercialism. But one present consistently hits wish lists for dreamers young and old: the telescope.It is so popular during the holiday season and such a difficult gift to select, that Westminster Astronomical Society is playing host to a telescope buyers' workshop at Bear Branch Nature Center in Silver Run at 7: 30 p.m. Nov. 15.Members will show their telescopes and answer questions to give prospective buyers a better sense of what is available and how much it costs.
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