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TRAVEL
July 4, 1999
Visitors to the American Museum of Natural History in New York can now explore the mysteries and marvels of planet Earth in the new Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth, or HoPE for short. This permanent exhibition is an 8,830-square-foot tribute to the planet, broken down into five exhibition zones exploring how the Earth evolved, why there are ocean basins, continents and mountains, and what causes climate and climate change.HoPE, which debuted last month, features re-creations of five ocean floor regions, more than 38 tons of rocks and a collection of videos and interactive computer programs to help visitors understand how scientists go about studying Earth's systems.
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NEWS
September 19, 2013
Enjoy the last outdoor movie of the season, "Escape from Planet Earth" (PG), Friday, Sept. 20, at dusk, at McCullough Field Stage at Eighth and Montgomery streets. This animated family comedy catapults moviegoers to planet Baab where admired astronaut Scorch Supernova is the national hero to blue alien populations. Event sponsored by Department of Parks and Recreation. For information, call 301-725-7800.
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FEATURES
April 23, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Ed Norton hosts a look at environmental dangers in National Geographic's Strange Days on Planet Earth (9 p.m., MPT, Channels 26/67).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | September 15, 2011
OK, before you read this, you should know two things about me:  1) Before tonight, I liked meatballs. They were meaty and tasty and they made spaghetti better.  2) I'm generally opposed to bans. I'm usually for individual freedom and letting people make their own choices.  That said, after watching tonight's episode of "Jersey Shore," I must unequivocally call for a ban of meatballs. Not just from dinner tables. Or America. From Planet Earth.  Meatballs are not longer a tasty treat that improves tomato sauce.
NEWS
February 20, 2009
Pat Koehler in Baltimore asks: "What causes the axial tilt of planet Earth?" Earth spins on an axis tilted 23.4 degrees from the plane of its orbit around the sun. That tilt produces our annual seasons. The initial spin and tilt were the result of impacts as the Earth formed. The drag of solar and lunar gravity have since slowed the spin and altered the tilt some. Tilts vary. Mercury's is 2 degrees; Uranus' is 98
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | August 24, 1995
There is an 80 percent chance that Congress will restore the bulk of a budget cut proposed for a major space program at Goddard Space Flight Center, saving the 3,300 jobs scheduled for elimination, Rep. Steny H. Hoyer said yesterday.Speaking to a lunch meeting in Greenbelt of the Maryland Space Roundtable, Mr. Hoyer said a House subcommittee has voted to restore $274 million of the $333 million that the Appropriations Committee had cut from Goddard's "Mission to Planet Earth" program in July.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
Enjoy the last outdoor movie of the season, "Escape from Planet Earth" (PG), Friday, Sept. 20, at dusk, at McCullough Field Stage at Eighth and Montgomery streets. This animated family comedy catapults moviegoers to planet Baab where admired astronaut Scorch Supernova is the national hero to blue alien populations. Event sponsored by Department of Parks and Recreation. For information, call 301-725-7800.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A key Senate committee is expected today to rebuff a House decision to cut by one-fourth funding for the main mission of the Goddard Space Flight Center. The House move threatens to cost the Greenbelt facility 1,200 jobs.The Senate Appropriations Committee is expected to endorse a cut of $60 million in the Goddard-based mission instead of the $333 million approved by the House.If the Senate position prevails, according to Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat who serves on the Appropriations Committee, the effect on Goddard would be negligible.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1997
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory has signed long-term contracts with the Navy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration that represent more than three-fourths of the lab's funding for the next five years.The $1.6 billion Navy contract ensures that APL will continue its role as a major developer of new technology for the nation's fleet of warships. The lab provides research, engineering and technical services on projects such as the Aegis combat system and the Standard missile.
NEWS
April 10, 2009
Warmongering adds to economic woes I appreciate that The Baltimore Sun has again placed the quagmire in Afghanistan on the front page, where it belongs ("Afghan bombings expected to worsen," April 5). As someone who has been protesting the invasion of that desperately poor country since 2001, I believe the war should always be on the front page, as misbegotten military adventures mean death and destruction for all sides. And to be frank, it is utter madness, especially as we face economic devastation, to expend billions of tax dollars funding wars and the occupation of the Palestinian people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | July 8, 2010
The Baltimore Sun From the sight of emperor penguins in Antarctica, huddled against the cold and darkness, to sweeping shots of herd-filled plains, the TV series "Planet Earth" reached new heights of nature filmmaking. The show, which debuted on the BBC in 2006 and in this country on the Discovery Channel the next year, featured the results from 12,000 hours of film shot on state-of-the-art, high-def equipment over a period of 2,000 days on 204 locations in 62 countries. "Planet Earth" gained impressive ratings around the globe and, in its DVD release, has sold millions of copies.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Robert Stone's "Earth Days" is a surprisingly calm documentary about the history of American ecological activism. But it's good calm, not dead calm. It's a relief to see a filmmaker use commercials and industrial footage from the 1950s, portraying America as a materialistic wonderland, without adding too much jokey or tendentious spin. (The same goes for Stone's use of PSAs from the 1970s warning of environmental blight.) Stone's own greatest visual stroke is conveying an epiphany of the planet as a life-unifying sphere during a drug trip in San Francisco - an experience that eventually led Stewart Brand to found and edit the Whole Earth Catalog.
NEWS
April 10, 2009
Warmongering adds to economic woes I appreciate that The Baltimore Sun has again placed the quagmire in Afghanistan on the front page, where it belongs ("Afghan bombings expected to worsen," April 5). As someone who has been protesting the invasion of that desperately poor country since 2001, I believe the war should always be on the front page, as misbegotten military adventures mean death and destruction for all sides. And to be frank, it is utter madness, especially as we face economic devastation, to expend billions of tax dollars funding wars and the occupation of the Palestinian people.
NEWS
February 20, 2009
Pat Koehler in Baltimore asks: "What causes the axial tilt of planet Earth?" Earth spins on an axis tilted 23.4 degrees from the plane of its orbit around the sun. That tilt produces our annual seasons. The initial spin and tilt were the result of impacts as the Earth formed. The drag of solar and lunar gravity have since slowed the spin and altered the tilt some. Tilts vary. Mercury's is 2 degrees; Uranus' is 98
FEATURES
April 23, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Ed Norton hosts a look at environmental dangers in National Geographic's Strange Days on Planet Earth (9 p.m., MPT, Channels 26/67).
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
Reinventing the ordinary has had an extraordinary impact on the bottom line of a new Baltimore company called 180s. Revenues at the company - best known for its ear warmers that wrap around the back of the head - grew 9,669 percent from 1998 to 2002. That remarkable pace has propelled it to the top spot on a new list of the 100 fastest-growing private companies in U.S. inner cities that was compiled by the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City, a nonprofit business research organization in Boston, and Inc. magazine.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer Sun staff writers Ted Shelsby and Karen Hosler contributed to this article | May 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to save billions of dollars and stave off even deeper cuts proposed in Congress, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin announced plans yesterday to eliminate 28,000 space-related jobs within five years, including more than 3,000 in Maryland.But Mr. Goldin warned that proposals on Capitol Hill to cut the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's spending even further would have a "devastating" effect on the agency and hold back U.S. scientific progress.The Clinton administration wants to reduce NASA's budget to $13 billion by 2000, down from the current figure of $14.3 billion.
NEWS
December 24, 1991
What a statement: "We probably have a better global map of Venus now than we have of Earth, because most of the ocean basins on Earth are so poorly mapped." That's from Dr. Stephen Saunders, chief scientist on the Magellan project, which is surveying Earth's nearest neighbor by radar.The first pictures from that radar imaging experiment, 14 months in the making, are stunning: Five-mile-high Maat Mons, only the second highest peak on the planet, surrounded by lava flows. Two-mile Gula Mons, small by Venusian standards, dominating a plain on which is stamped Crater Cunitz, named for astronomer Maria Cunitz.
NEWS
January 1, 2001
IT'S TOO LATE for the partying. We did that a year ago. And it's too late to worry about the collapse of our technology-driven world. (Remember the Y2K fears that didn't pan out?) But today we get a second chance to do it right -- celebrate the true start of the millennium. There's no Year Zero in our history books. We don't count time that way. We begin with Year 1. That means the next thousand-year period begins right now, on the first day of Year 2001. Happy Third Millennium! That's a huge chunk of human history, a giant swath of multi-generational happenings, beginning with the traditional year used to commemorate the birth of Jesus of Galilee (though experts believe he was actually born a few years earlier)
TRAVEL
July 4, 1999
Visitors to the American Museum of Natural History in New York can now explore the mysteries and marvels of planet Earth in the new Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth, or HoPE for short. This permanent exhibition is an 8,830-square-foot tribute to the planet, broken down into five exhibition zones exploring how the Earth evolved, why there are ocean basins, continents and mountains, and what causes climate and climate change.HoPE, which debuted last month, features re-creations of five ocean floor regions, more than 38 tons of rocks and a collection of videos and interactive computer programs to help visitors understand how scientists go about studying Earth's systems.
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