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By Liz F. Kay | April 22, 2011
Happy Earth Day, everyone! I hope you'll get an opportunity to take advantage of some of the Earth Day freebies, deals and discounts we mentioned yesterday. Many reward behavior that benefits the planet, such as carrying a reusable beverage container or offering a reusable bag to tote your purchases. Some greener choices make good economic as well as environmental sense: shops sometimes offer smaller discounts yearround when you bring your own mug or bag; making your home more energy efficient can lower your utility bills; and keeping your car's tires filled can improve your gas mileage.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
A satellite that has been hurtling toward Mars for the past 10 months slammed on the brakes Sunday night, gliding into the red planet's gravity field to spend a year studying its atmosphere - and hopefully collect evidence that Mars might once have supported life. On a mission managed from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, the MAVEN spacecraft neared completion Sunday night of a 442 million-mile journey by firing six thrusters in reverse and being pulled into Mars' gravity field.
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NEWS
May 10, 2010
Chris Bolgiano is to be commended for emphasizing that choosing to not have children is not only a meaningful life option but also contributes to curbing the world's population problem ("To be — or not to be — a mother," May 9). But her remark that "the birthrate in America is historically low" leaves the impression the U.S. does not have a population problem. Nothing could be further from the truth. Not only are we the third most populous nation in the world (behind China and India)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Planet Fitness, known for a "no judgment" atmosphere, will open its first Baltimore city facility Wednesday. The gym at 5201 Belair Road is one of 800 Planet Fitness locations nationwide -- and 25 in Maryland --  all run by franchise owners and billing themselves as low-cost health club alternatives designed to promote general fitness.  "We believe no one should ever feel Gymtimidated by Lunky behavior and that everyone should feel at ease...
NEWS
June 2, 2010
Baltimore is so poor that it considers closing fire houses and firing firefighters and the ACLU is pushing for school construction in the billions ("ACLU criticizes lack of school construction funding in city," June 2). Classic case of stupidity par excellence. F.P. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
September 6, 2012
Where are these jobs that Mitt Romney and Rep. Paul Ryan profess to have at their fingertips should they be elected? Why isn't the electorate demanding to know? Could it possibly be that they are planning to drill in every open space this country has where they even smell oil and the environment be damned? Judging by what was spoken at the Republican National Convention, that is exactly what the rascals plan! Amy Carroll, Timonium
NEWS
January 13, 2012
Taken right out of the Bill Clinton handbook, Gov. Martin O'Malley floats a trial balloon and suggests a hike in the state's gas tax only to alter the plan and now suggest an increase in the sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent. Is this man on the same planet as we the taxpayers? Doesn't he know how much the people who pay taxes are hurting? Raising these taxes goes to the gut of people who are still fortunate to be employed. Perhaps the "New Americans" the governor is so fond of can afford the tax hike and pay for the new roads and bridges only they will be using.
NEWS
August 21, 2006
When the Hubble Space Telescope snapped the first pictures of the surface of Pluto, it captured the elusive planet's icy veneer and summer shroud, which one scientist likened to the bright snows of Colorado. And although Pluto didn't have the sexiness of Venus or the panache of Mars, the photographs of a decade ago provided scientists with the first detailed views of the faraway planet since its discovery in 1930. "It's fantastic," gushed astronomer Marc W. Buie back then. Fast forward to 2006.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | August 9, 2011
More than the apes are smart in "Rise of the Planet of the Apes. " This smartly packaged prequel in the long-running simian series rejuvenates what had seemed like a tired franchise. Don't be surprised if these digitally created apes continue to rise in future installments. What makes this latest ape movie work is that it adheres to traits that seem old-fashioned in the current summer movie marketplace. Working with a solidly crafted script by Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver, director Rupert Wyatt oversees a deliberately paced, detail-oriented story.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
To the age-old question of how many conservatives does it take to screw in a light bulb, we now have a definitive answer: Just one, but it will take him weeks to chase down a vintage incandescent bulb because he won't touch an energy-efficient one. At least that's the obvious conclusion to draw from a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, put together by researchers from Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, asked hundreds of people to pass judgment on light bulb options.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 5, 2014
It is irreversible now. And there's a word that should get everybody's attention. Last month, two groups of scientists, publishing separately in the journals Science and Geophysical Research Letters, issued reports that came to alarmingly similar conclusions: The melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet has reached a point of no return. If greenhouse gases stopped spewing forth tomorrow, we'd still face the grim prospect of steadily rising seas from this unstoppable melt. So it would be a good idea to save what ice we still can. Or else condemn our grandchildren to vie for beachfront property in St.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Mars will appear at its biggest and brightest in the night sky this week as it aligns with the Earth and sun on Tuesday. The red planet reaches what is known as opposition Tuesday, when it and the sun are on directly opposite sides of the Earth. That occurs once about every 26 months, according to NASA. "Earth makes two trips around the sun in about the same amount of time that Mars takes to make one trip," according to NASA . "So sometimes the two planets are on opposite sides of the sun, very far apart, and other times, Earth catches up with its neighbor and passes relatively close to it. " This month, Earth and Mars are meanwhile at their closest for nearly 6 and a half years, appearing bigger and brighter than it has since December 2007, according to EarthSky.org.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
Wouldn't it be easier (and cheaper) if everyone just picked up after themselves and taught their children to do the same ("Bag tax economics," Jan. 22)? I work with people of all ages who could not care less about the planet. What has happened to taking responsibility? Madoline Madigan, Middle River - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In a room with concrete block walls from which he can barely see the sky, Drake Deming explores the heavens. Several days a week he can be found in his office at the University of Maryland, College Park, surrounded by three computer screens, analyzing information about planets outside our solar system. In these remote regions - no closer than four light years - roughly 24 trillion miles - and as far as hundreds of light years away - scientists hope one day to find an Earth-like world capable of supporting life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Eggs, cabbage, celery, beets - not great ingredients for an omelet, perhaps, but ideal for a multimedia genre defined as "puppet cinema. " Welcome to "Planet Egg," a show taking over the Baltimore Theatre Project for the weekend with a mix of edibles, found objects, puppetry, music and live-feed video. It's the brainchild of Zvi Sahar, an Israeli-born, New Jersey-based actor, director and puppeteer. At his parents' home in Israel a few years ago, Sahar was watching his father working on a phone and his mother making sunny-side-up eggs.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
As travelers who enjoy a cruise as one kind of lovely vacation, my family is certain now never to cruise with Carnival Cruise Lines - not because the line will move to Tampa, Fla., in 2014, but because of its leadership's sadly narrow perspective on how to preserve their profits at the cost of endangering our seas and coastal areas ("Carnival has plans to ship out of port," June 28). Knowing that Carnival continues to haggle with the EPA over implementing standards to reduce air pollution, it would be unconscionable for an informed traveler to even consider voyaging with Carnival Cruise Lines.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Heather Dewar and Sun Staff | September 24, 2000
First of five articles AASEN, Netherlands -- Leopold Hendrick admits a visitor through the locked doors of the world's first bureaucracy dedicated to tracking and taxing animal waste, a kind of manure IRS. The government administrator apologizes for the tight security: "We are not so popular. Some farmers broke in and tried to steal their dossiers." Other nations should track plutonium so closely. Dutch farmers must report to the nation's 340-employee Levy Bureau how much their 4.2 million cattle, 14 million pigs and 108 million chickens eat. They must inform the bureau of their farms' precise output, the meat and dairy products they ship away.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
When a passion for "Game of Thrones" meets up with the kind of inquisitive mind it takes to be a physics grad student at a school like Johns Hopkins University, what you get is the "circumbinary" hypothesis of weird weather seasons in Westeros. Don't mock it unless you have a better explanation as to how "summer can last for decade, winter for a generation" in the fictional world of "Thrones. " I love the kind of intellectual fun these JHU students are having with the the series.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
A review of 12,000 papers on climate change in the May 15 issue of "Environmental Research Letters," found that 97 percent of scientists attribute climate change to human activities. Although we're unlikely to reverse climate change, we can mitigate its effects by reducing our driving, energy use, and meat consumption. Yes, meat consumption. A 2006 U.N. report estimated that meat consumption accounts for 18 percent of man-made greenhouse gases. A 2009 article in the respected World Watch magazine suggested that it may be closer to 50 percent.
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