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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1996
It was Dec. 19, 1976, and less than 10 minutes after the Pittsburgh Steelers had crushed the Baltimore Colts, 40-14 in an AFC playoff game at Memorial Stadium.Veteran safety Bruce Laird was in the shower, trying to wash away the memory of an embarrassing defeat when someone shouted, "A plane just crashed in the upper deck!""I really cursed the guy," Laird recalled. "I said, 'After all the bleep that happened to us today, you've got to tell a sick joke like that?' But it turns out, he was telling the truth.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Many of the airplanes overhead in the Baltimore region could start looking a bit different soon, as Southwest Airlines unveiled a new logo and design for its aircraft Monday. The Dallas-based airline is the largest carrier in and out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport in Anne Arundel County, operating more than 70 percent of the flights along with subsidiary AirTran. The new red, yellow and blue logo is in the shape of a heart, meant to convey the people-first ethos long espoused publicly by the airline, it said.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 3, 2013
You can have your women in combat. You can have your women who lean in. You can even have your woman secretary of state who visits 112 countries. But my new heroes are women on planes with babies. Flying back and forth across the country over the holiday weekend, I met a lot of these road warriors. It seemed their children were never in a good mood, and neither, I'm guessing, were the childless passengers who suddenly found the plane had become an airborne day care center. Just imagine if every time you boarded a plane, you knew nobody in the cabin wanted to sit near you. That they'd rather sit next to the snoring fat guy who takes up a seat and a half than you and your babies.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
An 18-year-old Rockville man was one of four college students killed in a plane crash in Ohio Monday night, police said. Abraham Pishevar, a Georgetown Preparatory School graduate and freshman at Case Western Reserve University, died in the crash at about 10 p.m., shortly after takeoff at Cuyahoga County Regional Airport, according to the Ohio Highway Patrol. The other three men aboard the small Cessna aircraft were also Case Western students - William Felten, 20, of Saginaw, Mich.; Lucas Marcelli, 20, of Massillon, Ohio; and John Hill, 18, of St. Simons, Ga., the university said.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
A prominent Idaho businessman has lost his job after allegedly slapping a toddler on a plane when the child wouldn't stop crying. While many parents and fliers can agree that "Toddlers on a Plane" would be a terrifying premise for a film, most of us can figure out that hitting a stranger's child is not OK. But what steps can parents take to lessen their children's impact on other passengers? Some people swear by slipping kids a little Benadryl , but I've never gone this route.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | November 22, 2009
If you haven't been to the airport since last year's Thanksgiving trip, some things have changed - but much has stayed the same, including the ban on liquids. Although you might not want to pay those extra fees to check your luggage, you may have to if you're bringing a jar of your special turkey gravy recipe. Here's a sampling of things you cannot pack in your carry-on: 1. Meat cleaver 2. Mace/pepper spray 3. Cooking fuel 4. Gel candles 5. Perfume 6. Snowglobes 7. Cranberry sauce 8. Maple syrup 9. Oils and vinegar 10. Wine, liquor and beer Also, passengers are still limited to 3-ounce or smaller containers of liquids and gels, placed in a quart-size zip-top bag. Items such as baby food, breast milk and medicines are allowed to exceed three ounces.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
An American Airlines plane was damaged after it was struck by a ground support vehicle on the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport tarmac Sunday afternoon. The vehicle hit the nose of the jet as passengers were boarding Flight 140 to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport at around 4 p.m., according to an American Airlines spokesman. No passengers were injured, but the driver of the ground support vehicle was briefly hospitalized. The fiberglass cover on the front of the plane and the landing gear sustained damage, though cost estimates for repairs were unavailable Sunday evening.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Authorities say a plane that crashed Tuesday and killed two Marylanders reported problems before the aircraft went down. Stephen James Reardon, 68, and Beverly Ann Reardon, 59, both of Woodbine, died after their twin-engine airplane came almost straight down into a remote hilltop in the Daniel Boone National Forest, according to Kentucky State Police and the National Transportation Safety Board. An NTSB spokesman said the pilot radioed in problems with air speed and requested a lower altitude for the flight to air traffic controllers in Indianapolis.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
A flight out of BWI was forced to make a hasty landing in Indianapolis Wednesday due to a security issue, airline officials said. Southwest Airlines Flight 362 was bound for Indianapolis out of Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport Wednesday when it was granted "expedited clearance" to land at its destination, Southwest spokesman Dan Landson said. Landson could not provide further detail on the nature of the security issue, but said the 103 passengers and five crew members experienced an "uneventful landing," and were bussed to the terminal Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
It didn't quite measure up to making an emergency landing in the middle of the Hudson River, but as Harvey White stood beside the 120-foot chunk of airplane on a ramp off Interstate 95 near Perryville on Monday, he felt a sense of conquest. White, a resident of Rising Sun, and his wife, Ruth, had spent an hour and a half in their SUV trying to track down a unique procession: a caravan of 35 vehicles accompanying the fuselage of the US Airways plane that splash-landed in January 2009.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
After the Orioles completed a four-game sweep of the Texas Rangers with a 5-2 win Thursday night, the real battle began. The plane that was supposed to take them to Boston for Friday's series opener against the Red Sox wasn't expected to arrive in Baltimore until at least 2 a.m. First pitch is scheduled for 1:35 p.m. at Fenway Park. “We've got no plane,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said. Before Thursday's rain-delayed game, which ended at 11:13 p.m., Showalter said the storms ravaging the East Coast would keep their flight from landing in Baltimore until at least 10 p.m. That time was pushed back further and further as the night progressed, and the 2 a.m. estimate was a best-case scenario, Showalter explained.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
A flight out of BWI was forced to make a hasty landing in Indianapolis Wednesday due to a security issue, airline officials said. Southwest Airlines Flight 362 was bound for Indianapolis out of Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport Wednesday when it was granted "expedited clearance" to land at its destination, Southwest spokesman Dan Landson said. Landson could not provide further detail on the nature of the security issue, but said the 103 passengers and five crew members experienced an "uneventful landing," and were bussed to the terminal Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 13, 2014
Enough, already. Please, for the love of Cronkite: Give us a break from the missing plane. Yes, we all wonder what happened to it. Yes, our hearts go out to the families seeking resolution. But really, CNN ... enough. Put your hands up and step away from the story. I'm in the doctor's office the other day, right? I'm waiting for my missus and the TV is on and I'm half watching, half reading and you're covering the plane. And time passes. And you're covering the plane. And commercials intervene and you come back and you're covering the plane.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Four Maryland employees made about $255,000 in improper purchases - including guitars, plane tickets and toy soldiers - with state credit cards intended for business spending, a state audit of the program found. The audit concluded that agencies could prevent workers from abusing the 17-year-old, $260 million credit card program by using more comprehensive data to better monitor the purchases. Rather than viewing only where purchases were made, like a bank statement, state officials should regularly monitor data that shows exactly what was bought, said Thomas Barnickel, the legislative auditor.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Maryland Air National Guard is set to lose its attack aircraft but should be getting its airlift capability back, officials said Tuesday. The Air Force is planning to give the state eight C-130J Super Hercules turboprops, the cargo planes that Maryland pilots used to transport troops and equipment in Iraq, Afghanistan and natural disasters in the United States until 2011. The planes are due to arrive in fiscal year 2018, when the guard is set to lose its A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft.
NEWS
March 2, 2014
It should be clear by now that the Baltimore County Board of Education hired in Superintendent Dallas Dance an emperor without clothes ( "Signs of trouble in county schools?" Feb. 24). Every time it is pointed out to them that the superintendent's ideas are transparently self-serving, they simply say, "Oh no, it isn't so. " This has become a situation where studies, data and program design are laughed at and faith is put in sending our children up in what is described as a plane we are flying as we build it. Lord, preserve them from the crash.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
After the Orioles completed a four-game sweep of the Texas Rangers with a 5-2 win Thursday night, the real battle began. The plane that was supposed to take them to Boston for Friday's series opener against the Red Sox wasn't expected to arrive in Baltimore until at least 2 a.m. First pitch is scheduled for 1:35 p.m. at Fenway Park. “We've got no plane,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said. Before Thursday's rain-delayed game, which ended at 11:13 p.m., Showalter said the storms ravaging the East Coast would keep their flight from landing in Baltimore until at least 10 p.m. That time was pushed back further and further as the night progressed, and the 2 a.m. estimate was a best-case scenario, Showalter explained.
NEWS
February 24, 2010
Once again we have a liberal educator/columnist (Thomas F. Schaller) trying to connect the tea party and conservatives to this madman that flew his plane into the IRS building in Texas ("A double standard in what we define as 'terrorism,'" Feb. 23). Although many of us conservatives feel the outrage of big government, e.g. the IRS, none of us would think about flying a plane into the building. We are tired of these big government, pro-tax, anti-gun, pro-abortion, non-terrorist-fighting eggheads telling us that this guy had conservative values.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
A Southwest Airlines flight from Baltimore to Indianapolis was diverted to Pittsburgh Saturday morning after the pilot announced that a pane of glass in the cockpit had developed a crack, an airline spokesman confirmed. Southwest flight 849 left BWI around 10:45 a.m. and landed in Pittsburgh an hour later, shortly after the pilot's announcement. The flight was originally scheduled to leave at 10:15 a.m. and arrive in Indianapolis at 12:05 p.m. The crew announced that the plane's 64 passengers would be moved to another plane because of the "mechanical" problem.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
An American Airlines plane was damaged after it was struck by a ground support vehicle on the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport tarmac Sunday afternoon. The vehicle hit the nose of the jet as passengers were boarding Flight 140 to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport at around 4 p.m., according to an American Airlines spokesman. No passengers were injured, but the driver of the ground support vehicle was briefly hospitalized. The fiberglass cover on the front of the plane and the landing gear sustained damage, though cost estimates for repairs were unavailable Sunday evening.
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