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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
Two customers of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. have filed a class-action lawsuit against the Hampstead-based men's apparel chain, accusing the retailer of using deceptive marketing by claiming merchandise is on sale when it is actually being offered at regular price. James Waldron and Matthew Villani filed the complaint April 5 in U.S. District Court in New Jersey, seeking a jury trial. The plaintiffs filed on behalf of themselves and others who bought Jos. Bank merchandise from April 5, 2006, to the present.
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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Johns Hopkins University's motion to dismiss a family's lawsuit over development plans for a Montgomery County farm was denied Friday evening, according to the plaintiffs. The suit claims that Hopkins' plan to construct high-rise buildings on the land violates an agreement the land's previous owner entered into with the university more than twenty years ago, according to a statement from plaintiffs, led by John Timothy Newell. Elizabeth Beall Banks and her siblings transferred the 138-acre Belward Farm to Hopkins with the expectation that development of the land, near Gaithersburg, would be limited to a low-rise campus.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Some Jacksonville residents are, for the second time, asking a Maryland appeals court to reconsider its decision to reduce by more than half a $147 million jury verdict in a tainted-groundwater case. On Thursday, two days after the Court of Special Appeals denied the plaintiffs' first motion to reconsider the panel's February decision, attorneys filed a second request for the court to re-evaluate its conclusions. In February, the state's second-highest court rejected part of a jury's decision in a suit stemming from a gasoline leak in 2006 at anExxon Mobil Corp.filling station that contaminated the community's groundwater.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
The cleanup is supposed to be done in 2014, nearly eight years after 26,000 gallons of gasoline contaminated the groundwater in a northern Baltimore County neighborhood, but there's no end in sight for the legal wrangling. On Thursday, the state Court of Special Appeals rejected much of a $147 million jury verdict awarded in 2009 to about 90 homeowners who sued Exxon Mobil Corp., which owned the Jacksonville filling station where the gasoline seeped into the ground. The ruling has frustrated residents and diminished their hopes that they will ever be compensated for the property damage and emotional anguish suffered from having chemicals from unleaded gas flowing into their wells.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
The state's second-highest court has rejected much of a $147 million jury verdict that was awarded to hundreds of northern Baltimore County residents whose groundwater was contaminated by a gasoline leak at an Exxon station. The Court of Special Appeals ruling could mean that some of the Jacksonville plaintiffs — who endured a five-month trial — will have to return to court. "It comes as a surprise to us, because we haven't been informed," said plaintiff Tresia Parks, reached by phone Thursday night.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Baltimore's housing bureau does not have to pay a $2.6 million jury award to two siblings who say they were poisoned by lead paint when they lived in public residences as toddlers, a Maryland intermediate appellate court ruled Thursday. The decision, written by Judge Kathryn Grill Graeff of the Court of Special Appeals, hinges on the siblings not having filed notice of their claim within 180 days of their injury, as required by the state statute that governs personal injury suits against local governments.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
The U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division has urged a federal court to side with a Howard County man in a lawsuit over his cellphone being seized by Baltimore police at the Preakness Stakes after he filmed officers making an arrest. The federal attorneys say the lawsuit "presents constitutional questions of great moment in this digital age. " They asked U.S. District Judge Benson Everett Legg to rule that citizens have a right to record police officers and that officers who seize and destroy recordings without a warrant or due process are violating the Fourth and 14th amendments.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Alumni and students from Maryland's four historically black universities took their long-held view that the state perpetuates racial segregation to court Tuesday, arguing that their institutions are underfunded. The federal lawsuit calls on the state to pay for improvements at the four schools - Morgan State, Coppin State, Bowie State and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore - that would make them more competitive with traditionally white peers. It also calls for the dismantling of programs at traditionally white schools that "unnecessarily" duplicate programs at the historically black universities.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
A Baltimore City woman has filed a lawsuit in federal court against Baltimore County, its Police Department, several officers and officials, claiming she was assaulted and her constitutional rights violated when she was arrested while recording an encounter with police near a Towson bar two years ago. Venus C. Johnson, 30, who lives in North Baltimore, argues in the 18-count suit seeking $1 million in compensatory and unspecified punitive damages...
NEWS
By Tim Newell | December 19, 2011
The five weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day are the equivalent of "Black Friday" for charities, which receive nearly half of their annual donations during the holiday season, according to a Charity Navigator survey. Colleges and universities are no exception. Higher education institutions always have been among America's most successful fundraisers. In fact, of the 400 nonprofit organizations that raised the most money last year, nearly a third were colleges and universities, the Chronicle of Philanthropy found.
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