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NEWS
July 19, 2000
Do you know? How did the bald eagle get its name? Answer: From far away, the eagle's white head looks completely bald! Learn more! Visit the bald eagle at the Baltimore Zoo. Read "Bald Eagle" by Gordon Morrison. 1. Plains Indians once used golden eagle faethers for their war bonnets. 2. Bald eagles mate for life and use the same nest each year.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
THE BOOK I'M pushing this year, by Eastern Shore native and Brown University anthropology professor Shepard Krech 3rd, is not about the Chesapeake Bay, but it's powerfully illuminating for anyone concerned with living more lightly on our lands and waters. Krech, whose father is a retired country doctor and longtime supporter of the bay, grew up hunting with his grandfather, who "made it seem normal to be both a sportsman and a conservationist." He revisits that theme in "The Ecological Indian" (W. W. Norton, 1999)
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
THE BOOK I'M pushing this year, by Eastern Shore native and Brown University anthropology professor Shepard Krech 3rd, is not about the Chesapeake Bay, but it's powerfully illuminating for anyone concerned with living more lightly on our lands and waters. Krech, whose father is a retired country doctor and longtime supporter of the bay, grew up hunting with his grandfather, who "made it seem normal to be both a sportsman and a conservationist." He revisits that theme in "The Ecological Indian" (W. W. Norton, 1999)
NEWS
July 19, 2000
Do you know? How did the bald eagle get its name? Answer: From far away, the eagle's white head looks completely bald! Learn more! Visit the bald eagle at the Baltimore Zoo. Read "Bald Eagle" by Gordon Morrison. 1. Plains Indians once used golden eagle faethers for their war bonnets. 2. Bald eagles mate for life and use the same nest each year.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
In his author's note at the beginning of "The Rough-Face Girl," Rafe Martin writes that the 1,500 or so versions of the Cinderella story have kept alive "the universal yearning for justice."Who doesn't root for good (pure-hearted Cinderella) to triumph over evil (her vain, bullying stepsisters)? It explains why it is perhaps the most popular folk tale of all time, preserved in different forms over the centuries by people of all cultures.History will show that during our blip on the screen of civilization, Walt Disney's was the definitive version.
FEATURES
By Shirley Linde and Shirley Linde,Contributing Writer | July 5, 1992
The Indian leader called out the song in Comanche, and the Indians, some costumed, some in jeans and Western shirts, started a circle. The drum beat the rhythm, the dancers chanted, and a sound like that of a thousand crickets was made by the turtle shells and homemade metal shakers on the women's ankles as they shuffle-stepped around the circle. We were watching a traditional stomp dance at an American Indian powwow.There were eight of us there as part of a vacation program called Journeys into American Indian Territory.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 19, 1994
Janesville, Wis -- Some were drawn here by a compelling legend handed down through the ages in the Native American oral tradition. Others were called by messengers of the more electronic variety: CNN, National Public Radio, Paul Harvey.Whatever the source of the beckoning, thousands of modern-day pilgrims have found their way to this small southern Wisconsin town to see an animal so rare and myth-bound that she merits the name her owner has given her: Miracle.Born four weeks ago to parents that are densely and bushily brown, the ghostly white baby is a sight to see, especially for Native Americans who believe they are witnessing part of their lore come to life.
TRAVEL
January 28, 2007
I took this photo at the Little Bighorn Battlefield in Montana, the site of the battle between Lt. Col. George Custer and the Sioux. My wife and I visited the area in August 2005 as part of an Elderhostel program on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. I was captivated by the image of the Indians on their horses with the Montana plains and sky visible through the outline of the sculpture. It was emblematic of the vanishing Plains Indians to whom it is dedicated. Tom Scheurich, Fallston
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 23, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- How do you film buffaloes being shot and killed during a stampede without injuring a single beast? How do you get a buffalo to charge an actor without endangering either?By using, respectively, fake and stunt buffaloes, says Jim Wilson, Kevin Costner's co-producer on "Dances With Wolves."To re-create the buffalo hunt so central to the survival of the Plains Indians, Wilson used five animated buffaloes -- life-size buffalo mannequins mounted on dollies and yanked to the ground while traveling at 30 mph amid a pack of live buffalo.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 7, 2008
A snowscape painting purchased for $150 is now valued at $70,000, and the owner cannot stop giggling when she gets the news - until she literally loses her breath and starts to gasp for air. A Kwakiutl ceremonial mask bought for $4,000 by a guy who sounds like a real wheeler-dealer is appraised at only $2,000 - it's not authentic - and the suddenly speechless owner looks as if he's been punched in the gut. On TV Antiques Roadshow airs at 8 tonight on...
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 19, 1994
Janesville, Wis -- Some were drawn here by a compelling legend handed down through the ages in the Native American oral tradition. Others were called by messengers of the more electronic variety: CNN, National Public Radio, Paul Harvey.Whatever the source of the beckoning, thousands of modern-day pilgrims have found their way to this small southern Wisconsin town to see an animal so rare and myth-bound that she merits the name her owner has given her: Miracle.Born four weeks ago to parents that are densely and bushily brown, the ghostly white baby is a sight to see, especially for Native Americans who believe they are witnessing part of their lore come to life.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
In his author's note at the beginning of "The Rough-Face Girl," Rafe Martin writes that the 1,500 or so versions of the Cinderella story have kept alive "the universal yearning for justice."Who doesn't root for good (pure-hearted Cinderella) to triumph over evil (her vain, bullying stepsisters)? It explains why it is perhaps the most popular folk tale of all time, preserved in different forms over the centuries by people of all cultures.History will show that during our blip on the screen of civilization, Walt Disney's was the definitive version.
FEATURES
By Shirley Linde and Shirley Linde,Contributing Writer | July 5, 1992
The Indian leader called out the song in Comanche, and the Indians, some costumed, some in jeans and Western shirts, started a circle. The drum beat the rhythm, the dancers chanted, and a sound like that of a thousand crickets was made by the turtle shells and homemade metal shakers on the women's ankles as they shuffle-stepped around the circle. We were watching a traditional stomp dance at an American Indian powwow.There were eight of us there as part of a vacation program called Journeys into American Indian Territory.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 2003
Sixteen-year-old Kevin Broderick is a history buff. On a family vacation to Montana last summer, he attended a lecture at Glacier National Park. The speaker, Blackfoot Indian Curly Bear Wagner, told Native American legends. Wagner also mentioned that he was developing a CD-ROM that explores the Lewis and Clark expedition from an Indian point of view. "I found that to be really interesting, since I knew that this year ... we would be studying the Lewis and Clark expedition," said Kevin, a junior at Glenelg Country School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Asher and James Asher,Sun Staff | March 18, 2001
"Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America," by Elliott J. Gorn. Hill and Wang. 408 pages. $27. America quaked in the decades after the Civil War. The Plains Indians were at war. The nation's cities were swollen with immigration. The industrialization of the country was well under way, marking the beginning of the end of an agrarian society. Former slaves tested their freedom. Coal was being gouged from the Appalachian and Rocky mountains in prodigious quantities. Steel was making fortunes in Pennsylvania.
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