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By Thomas Fletcher and Thomas Fletcher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 1998
Think of the Amish and most people think of Lancaster County, Pa. Here you will see these "Plain People" in their distinctive dress: the men in beards, broad-brimmed hats and black clothes; the women in their bonnets and long dresses, which are often green or purple, but always covered with black aprons. Eschewing modern conveniences, the Amish farm using horses, mules and equipment from a bygone era to work the land. Transportation is by horse and buggy. Electrical power and telephones are not found in their homes.
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NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
To commemorate H.L. Mencken's birthday on this site,* it seems particularly fitting to repeat a salient passage from The American Language , a caution to all those who hold forth and English grammar and usage: The error of ... viewers with alarm is in assuming that there is enough magic in pedagogy to teach 'correct' English to the plain people. There is, in fact, too little; even the fearsome abracadabra of Teachers College, Columbia, will never suffice for the purpose. The plain people will always make their own language, and the best that grammarians can do is to follow after it, haltingly, and often without much insight.
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FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,Special to The Sun | May 28, 1995
Lititz, Pa. -- Many days, strangers and near-strangers turn up on Esther Smucker's front porch in Lancaster County and tap softly on the screen door. When Esther appears, the visitors act as if they already know her -- or at least know her pain.One woman brings her a magnificent Easter lily. A man from Virginia stops by for an autograph. A passing acquaintance wants to buy copies of her book, "Good Night, My Son," for her co-workers at a nearby restaurant in Ephrata.Most of the visitors need to talk.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2004
Jacob Faiser said he's been growing tobacco since "I became old enough," and plans to continue, even though the majority of tobacco farmers in Maryland have agreed to stop. He also plans to put each of his nine children to work in the tobacco fields at 16. At 21, they will start their own family and farm. "It's what we know how to raise," the Amish farmer said matter-of-factly during a trip last month to Hughesville in Charles County to auction off his crop. Most of Maryland's tobacco growers - about 85 percent who produced 95 percent of the crop - have agreed to switch to other crops under a state buyout program.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
To commemorate H.L. Mencken's birthday on this site,* it seems particularly fitting to repeat a salient passage from The American Language , a caution to all those who hold forth and English grammar and usage: The error of ... viewers with alarm is in assuming that there is enough magic in pedagogy to teach 'correct' English to the plain people. There is, in fact, too little; even the fearsome abracadabra of Teachers College, Columbia, will never suffice for the purpose. The plain people will always make their own language, and the best that grammarians can do is to follow after it, haltingly, and often without much insight.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 14, 2001
The president got his budget. From now on, it's all his fault. House members are furious the United States was voted off agencies they don't even want it in anyway. "No one ... ever lost money by underestimating the intell- igence of the great masses of the plain people," wrote H. L. Mencken, who never dreamt of the XFL. Alas, there are pols in Mass. who wouldn't even give their governor their seat on a bus.
NEWS
November 22, 1993
DAVID Nicholson began his Washington Post review of a new biography this way:"Howard Stern? Howard Stern? Who would have thunk that the life story of the King of the Shock Jocks (and now the self proclaimed King of All Media) would leap to the top of the charts, selling more copies more quickly than any other book Simon and Schuster has published. It's testimony to one of the wonders of America that people with marginal talent can, and do, get rich in this land of opportunity. Or perhaps it's just another reminder of P. T. Barnum's famous dictum about how no one ever goes broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public."
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
LANCASTER, Pa. -- From a distance, the landscape is a romance of rolling hills dotted with silos and the sweet scent of honeysuckle.In closer, drowsy little towns come into view with Amish horse-drawn buggies joggling down pastoral roads amid knee-high cornfields.But at point-blank range, the picture is marred by a little sign on a storefront window: "MEGA STORES DESTROY SMALL TOWNS."Wal-Mart is coming.Here, as the nation's largest retailer plans to build four 24-hour-a-day supercenters and a discount club, a feud is playing out.Galvanized, anti-Wal-Mart citizen militias called "Save Our Small Town Way of Life" and "Up Against the Wal" have sprung up with office space, attorneys and petition drives.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry | October 22, 1990
FOR FOUR mid-October days on the campus of Gettysburg College, scholars and old-timers close to him solemnly dissected and appraised the presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower -- the former general who balanced budgets and served eight years without losing a life in war.Celebrating Eisenhower's 100th birthday anniversary, they of course found plenty in the soldier-statesman's record of economy, effective cooperation with Congress and management of the nation's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | January 18, 2004
Is God sending a fitness message or just exercising his sense of humor? According to a newly released study, the Amish, those technology-shunning, buggy-driving, gravy-loving, devoutly Christian "Plain People" -- you know, the Dour Ones who won't crack a smile even if gang-tickled -- may have the last laugh when it comes to good health. We've got the cars. They have legs of steel: The study found Amish men on average take 18,425 steps a day, about nine miles of walking; Amish women, 14,196.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | January 18, 2004
Is God sending a fitness message or just exercising his sense of humor? According to a newly released study, the Amish, those technology-shunning, buggy-driving, gravy-loving, devoutly Christian "Plain People" -- you know, the Dour Ones who won't crack a smile even if gang-tickled -- may have the last laugh when it comes to good health. We've got the cars. They have legs of steel: The study found Amish men on average take 18,425 steps a day, about nine miles of walking; Amish women, 14,196.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
"I'm committed to life. But I can't shut myself off from the past. I don't forget yesterday, so I know who I am today. I hang on to what I was yesterday, so I know what I'm going to do tomorrow." - Ralph Fasanella, as quoted by Paul S. D'Ambrosio in his book, Ralph Fasanella's America. Ralph Fasanella wanted his paintings to speak to people - plain people, working people. And they do. They all but grab you by the lapels and demand attention. They teem with people and seethe with ideas, restless as the man himself.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 14, 2001
The president got his budget. From now on, it's all his fault. House members are furious the United States was voted off agencies they don't even want it in anyway. "No one ... ever lost money by underestimating the intell- igence of the great masses of the plain people," wrote H. L. Mencken, who never dreamt of the XFL. Alas, there are pols in Mass. who wouldn't even give their governor their seat on a bus.
NEWS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1998
NEW HOLLAND, Pa. -- Eli's grandfather reckons that the Amish are like other folks."We believe the best environment for the Plain People is the farm," he explained, standing in a well-ordered woodshop near fertile fields that his family has cultivated for six generations. "So just like you will save and bend over backwards to send your children to college, we will save and bend over backwards to help our sons and daughters buy a farm."The problem for Eli's grandfather - who does not want to be identified further because of church strictures - and the 36,000 other Plain Sect disciples in Lancaster County is that developers are encroaching on farmland they have tended since William Penn welcomed their persecuted forebears nearly three centuries ago.Fastest-growing countyLancaster is the fastest-growing county in Pennsylvania as families move in from Philadelphia and other East Coast cities.
FEATURES
By Thomas Fletcher and Thomas Fletcher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 1998
Think of the Amish and most people think of Lancaster County, Pa. Here you will see these "Plain People" in their distinctive dress: the men in beards, broad-brimmed hats and black clothes; the women in their bonnets and long dresses, which are often green or purple, but always covered with black aprons. Eschewing modern conveniences, the Amish farm using horses, mules and equipment from a bygone era to work the land. Transportation is by horse and buggy. Electrical power and telephones are not found in their homes.
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
LANCASTER, Pa. -- From a distance, the landscape is a romance of rolling hills dotted with silos and the sweet scent of honeysuckle.In closer, drowsy little towns come into view with Amish horse-drawn buggies joggling down pastoral roads amid knee-high cornfields.But at point-blank range, the picture is marred by a little sign on a storefront window: "MEGA STORES DESTROY SMALL TOWNS."Wal-Mart is coming.Here, as the nation's largest retailer plans to build four 24-hour-a-day supercenters and a discount club, a feud is playing out.Galvanized, anti-Wal-Mart citizen militias called "Save Our Small Town Way of Life" and "Up Against the Wal" have sprung up with office space, attorneys and petition drives.
NEWS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1998
NEW HOLLAND, Pa. -- Eli's grandfather reckons that the Amish are like other folks."We believe the best environment for the Plain People is the farm," he explained, standing in a well-ordered woodshop near fertile fields that his family has cultivated for six generations. "So just like you will save and bend over backwards to send your children to college, we will save and bend over backwards to help our sons and daughters buy a farm."The problem for Eli's grandfather - who does not want to be identified further because of church strictures - and the 36,000 other Plain Sect disciples in Lancaster County is that developers are encroaching on farmland they have tended since William Penn welcomed their persecuted forebears nearly three centuries ago.Fastest-growing countyLancaster is the fastest-growing county in Pennsylvania as families move in from Philadelphia and other East Coast cities.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | May 29, 1991
Many people, Aaron Beiler was told recently, think the Amish are putting on some sort of show for the benefit of tourists. "A big percentage of people think it's just a big Disneyland or something," he says with a laugh.Tourists who observe the Amish horse-drawn buggies keeping their own steady, serene pace at the edges of well-traveled Lancaster County roads might be forgiven for mistaking Pennsylvania Dutch country for some sort of Williamsburgesque living-history theme park. The "Plain People" in their long beards and straw hats, or their caps and modest, aproned dresses, are so purposefully out of step with hustling mainstream America that they might be living long, long ago or far, far away instead of thriving right in our midst.
FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,Special to The Sun | May 28, 1995
Lititz, Pa. -- Many days, strangers and near-strangers turn up on Esther Smucker's front porch in Lancaster County and tap softly on the screen door. When Esther appears, the visitors act as if they already know her -- or at least know her pain.One woman brings her a magnificent Easter lily. A man from Virginia stops by for an autograph. A passing acquaintance wants to buy copies of her book, "Good Night, My Son," for her co-workers at a nearby restaurant in Ephrata.Most of the visitors need to talk.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | January 9, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- It was 20 years ago next week that the first of these contributions appeared on this page. There have been almost 1,500 of them since, which seems like a lot but really isn't. If you set all those words in one standard-width newspaper column they wouldn't even make a mile.The Sun was a different paper then, and the world was a different world. Richard Nixon was still in the White House, there were long lines at American gasoline stations, and in South Vietnam a rickety regime was tottering but hadn't yet collapsed.
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