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By Peter Hermann | February 3, 2012
State police have begun talking like real people. Troopers were ordered this week to dispense with speaking in code. Gone is the familiar 10-4 and the unfamiliar (to civilians, anyway) 10-46. Instead, when speaking over the police radio, the trooper is to just say, "disabled vehicle. " It's effort by the cops to streamline communications and make it easier for police in one jurisdiction to talk with police in another jurisdiction. The codes were originally designed to enable cops to exchange information quickly, and to keep prying ears from understanding what was being said.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
It isn't often that one hears the word "stellar" used to describe a federal form. Nevertheless, that's the term Annetta Cheek, a leading advocate of clarity in how government communicates with citizens, uses to praise the form that took the Grand ClearMark Award this spring in the annual contest run by the Center for Plain Language. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau uses the form to lay out exactly what a home mortgage will cost. It shows in concise, clear terms and large print the interest rate and how the monthly payments break down.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Advocates for plain language have issued their first report card on how clearly federal agencies communicate with taxpayers and others - and the Social Security Administration has drawn a pair of C's. That put the Woodlawn-based administration in the middle of the dozen agencies assessed by the Center for Plain Language. The Washington-based organization promotes clear, easy-to-understand communication in government, business, nonprofits and academia. On the first anniversary of the Plain Writing Act, the center graded each agency this month on how well it has met the requirements of the law and how well it has followed the "spirit" of the legislation.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Every so often Greg Rosenthal comes across a word like "diapause. " And that's when things get interesting. A 10-year veteran of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rosenthal is frequently responsible for translating the wonky, academic language used by scientists and policy experts into words and concepts the public can understand. His work is paying off for the USDA. The Center for Plain Language, a Virginia-based group that promotes clear communication in government and business, last week ranked the department's written word among the best in the federal government.
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | November 7, 2005
Over the years, true or not, the story has taken on unmistakable power: Sometime in the 1970s, two little old ladies in Derbyshire, England, had trouble making their rent. On the verge of eviction, they donned their spectacles, flipped nervously through the phone book and finally located a number for the local housing authority. To their great relief, they learned they were eligible for government support. A form arrived in the mail. They tried to read it. But its instructions were so convoluted they didn't know what to do. They died in the streets that winter.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Cops are starting to talk like the rest of us. The Maryland State Police became the latest law enforcement agency to throw out its cryptic language, directing officers this week to stop telling each other "10-4" and instead just say "OK. " It's a transformation of seismic proportions — veteran officers who in the academy had to memorize the codes and got in trouble for calling in "livestock on highway" instead of a "10-54" will now have revert...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Every so often Greg Rosenthal comes across a word like "diapause. " And that's when things get interesting. A 10-year veteran of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rosenthal is frequently responsible for translating the wonky, academic language used by scientists and policy experts into words and concepts the public can understand. His work is paying off for the USDA. The Center for Plain Language, a Virginia-based group that promotes clear communication in government and business, last week ranked the department's written word among the best in the federal government.
NEWS
November 7, 2005
NATIONAL Midwest tornado kills 22 A tornado tore across western Kentucky and Indiana early yesterday, killing at least 22 people as it cut through a mobile home park and obliterated trailers and houses as residents slept. pg 3a WORLD Russian Communists seek role As Russia's Communists celebrate the 88th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution that brought Lenin to power and laid the foundation of the Soviet state, their party finds itself without reason to celebrate much else. pg 1a Marine dies in Iraq offensive A Marine was killed in an insurgent ambush yesterday when his patrol raided a house in the tense border town of Husaybah, the first American casualty in a Marine-led sweep through the area aimed at stopping foreign jihadists from infiltrating Iraq through the Syrian border.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2005
Ousted police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark wants $120 million from the city that fired him. What he doesn't want, at least for the time being, is the $75,000 that Baltimore's Board of Estimates gave him last week. Concerned that the money would be construed as a settlement of Clark's wrongful termination lawsuit, Clark's lawyers have asked the board to rescind the $75,000 severance payment it approved Jan. 12. "There have been no settlements with respect to his termination," a Jan. 13 letter from lawyers Stuart O. Simms, A. Dwight Pettit and Neal M. Janey states.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 5, 1999
PEOPLE concerned about whether their government can do the equivalent of bombing and chewing gum at the same time ought to be reassured by a couple of government memos that have recently come to my attention.The Training and Career Development Division of the National Institutes of Health's Program Support Center is inviting employees to a May 4 "intensive three-hour workshop on a process proven to create documents that drive action and support strategic decision."The purpose of the workshop is "to learn the six steps for meeting the president's plain language requirements."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Advocates for plain language have issued their first report card on how clearly federal agencies communicate with taxpayers and others - and the Social Security Administration has drawn a pair of C's. That put the Woodlawn-based administration in the middle of the dozen agencies assessed by the Center for Plain Language. The Washington-based organization promotes clear, easy-to-understand communication in government, business, nonprofits and academia. On the first anniversary of the Plain Writing Act, the center graded each agency this month on how well it has met the requirements of the law and how well it has followed the "spirit" of the legislation.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Cops are starting to talk like the rest of us. The Maryland State Police became the latest law enforcement agency to throw out its cryptic language, directing officers this week to stop telling each other "10-4" and instead just say "OK. " It's a transformation of seismic proportions — veteran officers who in the academy had to memorize the codes and got in trouble for calling in "livestock on highway" instead of a "10-54" will now have revert...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 3, 2012
State police have begun talking like real people. Troopers were ordered this week to dispense with speaking in code. Gone is the familiar 10-4 and the unfamiliar (to civilians, anyway) 10-46. Instead, when speaking over the police radio, the trooper is to just say, "disabled vehicle. " It's effort by the cops to streamline communications and make it easier for police in one jurisdiction to talk with police in another jurisdiction. The codes were originally designed to enable cops to exchange information quickly, and to keep prying ears from understanding what was being said.
NEWS
November 7, 2005
NATIONAL Midwest tornado kills 22 A tornado tore across western Kentucky and Indiana early yesterday, killing at least 22 people as it cut through a mobile home park and obliterated trailers and houses as residents slept. pg 3a WORLD Russian Communists seek role As Russia's Communists celebrate the 88th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution that brought Lenin to power and laid the foundation of the Soviet state, their party finds itself without reason to celebrate much else. pg 1a Marine dies in Iraq offensive A Marine was killed in an insurgent ambush yesterday when his patrol raided a house in the tense border town of Husaybah, the first American casualty in a Marine-led sweep through the area aimed at stopping foreign jihadists from infiltrating Iraq through the Syrian border.
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | November 7, 2005
Over the years, true or not, the story has taken on unmistakable power: Sometime in the 1970s, two little old ladies in Derbyshire, England, had trouble making their rent. On the verge of eviction, they donned their spectacles, flipped nervously through the phone book and finally located a number for the local housing authority. To their great relief, they learned they were eligible for government support. A form arrived in the mail. They tried to read it. But its instructions were so convoluted they didn't know what to do. They died in the streets that winter.
TOPIC
By Patrice M. Jones and Patrice M. Jones,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 12, 2005
Steven Levitt looks the part of the University of Chicago's next rising-star economist as he weaves his way down Michigan Avenue, his tie flapping in the wind, his cell phone humming. His dark suit says Wall Street, but after several days of too many airports and too many public appearances, his youthful eyes resemble those of a boy who needs a nap Levitt has been crisscrossing the nation promoting his new book, Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything, which delves into the decidedly unconventional economic turf of human frailties such as cheating, corruption and crime.
FEATURES
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Most of the reporters who filed into the Roosevelt Room of the White House yesterday were eager to hear the administration's take on why a U.S. warplane fired at an Iraqi radar site. But there was Vice President Al Gore, standing beside a turkey.The cartoon depiction of the animal was intended to symbolize Gore's recently announced mission to rid the federal bureaucracy of the "gobbledygook" that pollutes the pages of the government's regulatory codebooks.And while Gore eventually got to questions about the diplomatic tension in the Persian Gulf, he spent the bulk of his time on the event's advertised purpose: to praise the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which Gore says has led the pack in putting regulations in plain English, and is the winner of his inaugural monthly Plain Language Award.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
It isn't often that one hears the word "stellar" used to describe a federal form. Nevertheless, that's the term Annetta Cheek, a leading advocate of clarity in how government communicates with citizens, uses to praise the form that took the Grand ClearMark Award this spring in the annual contest run by the Center for Plain Language. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau uses the form to lay out exactly what a home mortgage will cost. It shows in concise, clear terms and large print the interest rate and how the monthly payments break down.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2005
Ousted police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark wants $120 million from the city that fired him. What he doesn't want, at least for the time being, is the $75,000 that Baltimore's Board of Estimates gave him last week. Concerned that the money would be construed as a settlement of Clark's wrongful termination lawsuit, Clark's lawyers have asked the board to rescind the $75,000 severance payment it approved Jan. 12. "There have been no settlements with respect to his termination," a Jan. 13 letter from lawyers Stuart O. Simms, A. Dwight Pettit and Neal M. Janey states.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2004
Cornerstone Community Church in Columbia describes itself as a "what you see is what you get" kind of church. That's because the people who attend its services aren't bombarded with "religiosity," said the Rev. Bruce Hopler, senior pastor of the church. Instead, they are given God's word in a plain way that most people can understand, he said. "We burst through what has become `Christian culture' by using everyday language to deliver messages that people can relate to, and use music and art forms that are similar to today's culture," Hopler explained.
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