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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 7, 1999
I'M WONDERING IF ANY OF YOU readers out there have noticed any suspicious behavior on the part of frogs. I ask because the ones at my house are definitely up to something.I live in South Florida, which has a hot, moist, armpit-like climate that is very favorable for life in general. Everything down here is either already alive, or about to be. You could leave your toaster out on your lawn overnight, and by morning it would have developed legs, a tail, a mouth, tentacles, etc., and it would be prowling around looking for slower, weaker appliances to prey on.So I am used to wildlife.
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NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | September 4, 2014
Throughout the Baltimore City school year, student success will be measured in the traditional ways, through test scores and grades, and, for high school seniors, by whether or not they graduate. While tracking such standards is vital to understanding student achievement and progress as well as the success of our school system as a whole, another key indicator deserves far more focused attention: attendance. For students to succeed in school, they have to be in school. And not enough of Baltimore City students are attending school as much as they should.
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NEWS
By JOAN BECK | August 29, 1995
Chicago. -- The phone rings. -- You've just started to eat dinner. Or the two of you are in just the right romantic mood.Or you're in the basement folding laundry.Or the baby's sick and crying and you're waiting for the pediatrician to call you back. Or guests have just rung your doorbell. Or you're concentrating successfully on an overdue work assignment.The voice is friendly, warm, nice. ''Is this Mrs. Beck? Joan! How are you today?''An old friend? A business colleague? Someone from church or your kids' school?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Johns Hopkins returned to the NCAA tournament after falling short of the postseason in 2013 for the first time in 42 years. But if the Blue Jays intend to make a deep run in the tournament, they have a couple of areas to address. One is the offense's woes in Saturday's 13-10 loss to Loyola Maryland. The unit was mired in scoring droughts of 16 minutes, 22 seconds spanning the first and second quarters and 17:31 stretching over the third and fourth periods as the Greyhounds mixed a zone defense with their traditional man-to-man schemes.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 22, 2000
DENVER - The mock bio-terrorism attack on Denver reached a pretend full-scale crisis with 1,314 confirmed cases of pneumonic plague and 255 "deaths." Area airports, bus stations and train depots were closed, and the governor ordered residents of the city to remain in their homes - all in the fictional context of the congressionally-ordered exercise. Called "TOPOFF," the exercise was the largest-ever test of the nation's ability to respond to a terrorist attack with biological and chemical weapons.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2004
In a case that has drawn protests from leading scientists, a prominent plague researcher who touched off a brief bioterrorism scare last year when he reported germ vials missing was sentenced yesterday to two years in prison by a federal judge in Lubbock, Texas. Dr. Thomas C. Butler, 62, was acquitted in a three-week trial of lying to the FBI about the missing vials and of most charges alleging that he mishandled plague samples. But he was convicted of 47 criminal counts, including theft, embezzlement and fraud in connection with consulting contracts.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
For the L. L. Bean of bacteria, it was an unfortunate first.A nonprofit organization in Rockville, which mails biological specimens to scientists all over the world, recently shipped a Federal Express package containing three vials of the deadly bubonic plague bacteria to an Ohio white supremacist.Frank P. Simione, vice president of the American Type Culture Collection, said it was the first known case where his 70-year-old organization delivered potentially lethal biological materials to someone who was not authorized to receive them.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff | November 17, 2003
America's trees are under attack. Species by species, they're being invaded by insects and fungi, native and foreign. Scientists fear their loss will devastate suburban streets and upset the delicate ecological balance of many woodlands. "Invasive species are a real threat to the nation's forests," said Dale Bosworth, chief of the U.S. Forest Service, at a recent conference in New Orleans. "There are so many things, it just seems too big to talk about. ... Like a slow-moving fire, they're going everywhere."
NEWS
January 3, 2000
LEAD paint poisoning makes a mockery of the city's effort to improve chlidren's reading scores. Even microscopic bits of lead in the human bloodstream impairs development of cognitive ability -- the ability to read, the ability to think, to reason and to control violent impulses. Once burrowed into brain, bone and other organ tissue, impairments are permanent. The only cure is prevention. In Baltimore, 31.6 percent of children tested have dangerously high levels of lead poisoning. That's more than seven times the national average of 4.4 percent.
NEWS
October 11, 1994
Health officials in India believe they have brought under control an outbreak of plague that began last month in the western city of Surat. Within days it had spread from one coast to the other.With modern medicines and sanitary methods, India appears to have been able to limit the loss of life. But already scores of people have died and hundreds have contracted the deadly disease.Throughout history plague has been one of the major killers of mankind, attacking in devastating epidemics that brought death and terror to millions.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Tourists never come to see the cherry blossoms in West Baltimore, in the heart of what local residents warmly refer to as "the hood. " But they could, as far as Marvin "Doc" Cheatham is concerned. "We could have people ride through, neighbors selling hot dogs and hamburgers, saying, 'You don't got to go to Washington for cherry blossoms!'" Cheatham said this weekend from his front steps in the 1600 block of Appleton St. The block has about 40 occupied homes, 11 boarded-up vacants, and about a dozen cherry trees - planted by the city in the 1970s, as Cheatham recalls.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
UMBC's defense picked an inopportune time to play its worst game of the season. The Retrievers surrendered a season-worst 17 goals in a two-goal defeat at High Point on Saturday. It was the biggest offensive display for the Panthers (6-2) in their two-year history as a Division I program. UMBC coach Don Zimmerman said the defense didn't seem to have the ability to match the energy demonstrated by High Point. “We looked tired, lethargic, flat, whatever you want to call it,” he said Monday morning.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
In meeting No. 13 Loyola on Wednesday at 3 p.m. at Ridley Athletic Complex in Baltimore, No. 18 Towson will play its third game of the season without midfielders Andrew Hodgson and Ben McCarty. Hodgson, a senior, and McCarty, a sophomore, have been sidelined by undisclosed injuries, and coach Shawn Nadelen said it was too much to expect the duo to return for a midweek contest after the Tigers lost, 15-8, to No. 12 Johns Hopkins on Saturday. “I think with the quick turnaround, it's tough on those guys getting ready with three games within seven days,” Nadelen said Monday.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 14, 2014
The Obama administration's latest delay in fully implementing the employer mandate in its embattled health-care insurance law confirms the harsh fact that it remains a huge political albatross hanging around the president's neck. The conceding of another year or more of time to employers to offer health-care coverage to their workers guarantees that the contentious issue will continue to plague Barack Obama as he struggles to free himself of the legislative near-paralysis that has gripped Washington throughout his Oval Office tenure.
NEWS
January 20, 2014
Fred Medinger hit the nail on the head ("Fireworks shock and intimidate," Jan. 13). As a fellow resident of Baltimore County, I have experienced the same problems in my neighborhood on New Year's Eve (from midnight until 2 a.m.) and on July 4th (usually starting at all hours of the night on the weekend prior to the 4th and continuing through the following weekend). These people are just one more example of how our society has deteriorated in this "me" generation. These people are thinking only of themselves and could care less that they are disturbing their neighbors and putting their neighbors' families and properties at risk.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
The Navy men's basketball team has dropped its last three games - a streak culminating with a 63-48 loss to UMBC Monday night. And coach Ed DeChellis said he knows what has contributed to the setbacks. DeChellis said the Midshipmen's defense and rebounding have been less than stellar in losses to Bryant on Dec. 14, Northern Kentucky on Dec. 21 and UMBC. The Bulldogs shot 50.9 percent (28-of-55) and collected 44 rebounds to Navy's 33 in a 90-80 victory in overtime. The Norse converted 51.0 percent (25-of-49)
NEWS
July 22, 2007
Baltimore's mayor fired Leonard D. Hamm, the city's eighth police commissioner in as many years. Dixon, facing a plague of murders that could top 300 by year's end and a pivotal mayorial primary in September, decided to dump Hamm after a poll conducted by The Sun indicated a lack of public confidence in the commissioner's leadership. ?I don't do things for form and fashion, I don't do things because it's politically correct.? Sheila Dixon
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | April 8, 2001
"In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World It Made," by Norman F. Cantor. The Free Press, 245 pages, $25. From the 1950s to the early 1980s, Americans popped antibiotics, vaccinated their children and assumed that infectious disease would soon be an enemy as obsolete as the woolly mammoth. Then came AIDS. Today it seems naive to believe humans will ever achieve total victory in their ancient contest with microbes. Human immunodeficiency virus is annihilating half a generation in parts of Africa.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 16, 2013
A careful reader pointed out a flaw in my column of Thursday. I noted that, before leaving for his nine-day trip to Brazil, Gov. Martin O'Malley had said problems with Maryland's mind-numbingly bad health insurance exchange would be fixed by mid-December. I said mid-December was Dec. 15 at noon. In fact, the halfway point of the month was Dec. 16 at noon. My math was off by a full 24 hours, so I may have been a little unfair to the governor. Turns out, it didn't matter. O'Malley announced on Saturday, Dec. 14, two days ahead of his deadline, that the state's online exchange was "now functional for most citizens.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Although state officials have provided the public scant detail about the troubled launch of Maryland's version of Obamacare, emails and documents show that the project was beset behind the scenes for months by an array of technical issues, warring contractors and other problems. Since Maryland's online health exchange opened Oct. 1 for people to buy insurance under the Affordable Care Act - and immediately crashed - the two main companies in charge of the website have taken their fight to court, a corporate project manager was replaced and a high-powered consulting firm was quietly brought in to restore order.
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