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Plagiarism

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NEWS
November 14, 2013
The Sun and other media outlets around the nation have recently covered claims of plagiarism by U.S. Sen. Rand Paul ("Don't copy, don't tell lies," Nov. 8). While the senator has conceded to prolific plagiarism, at least by some on his staff, the real reason for concern is less with the originality of words the senator claimed as his own than about the ideas expressed. Commenting on the Supreme Court's decision upholding the Affordable Care Act, Senator Paul said, "Just because a couple people on the Supreme Court declare something to be 'constitutional' does not make it so. " I am not sure how the senator defines "a couple," but in the Supreme Court decision he refers to a majority of five justices voted to uphold the health care law enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama.
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NEWS
By Kevin M. Brien | May 4, 2014
Twenty-two years ago at the end of a semester of teaching an Intro to Philosophy course, I received an unforgettable wake-up call on the issue of plagiarism. During the reading period between the final class session and the final exam, I discovered two blatant cases of plagiarized papers - I knew the books from which these papers had been copied whole cloth. So on exam day, and with apologies to those uninvolved, I brought the issue into the open. Without naming the offenders, I told the class that I expected the students who plagiarized to meet with me privately.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
A longtime Towson University professor has resigned his post as the head of the city school system's ethics panel amid allegations that his published academic articles contain content from dozens of sources without proper - or in some cases any - attribution. University officials and journal publishers say they are reviewing several articles submitted by Benjamin A. Neil, a legal affairs professor, after a librarian at another university alerted them to the issue. A Baltimore Sun review of five papers published by Neil shows passages with identical language and others with close similarities to scholarly journals, news publications, congressional testimony, blogs and websites.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
The Sun and other media outlets around the nation have recently covered claims of plagiarism by U.S. Sen. Rand Paul ("Don't copy, don't tell lies," Nov. 8). While the senator has conceded to prolific plagiarism, at least by some on his staff, the real reason for concern is less with the originality of words the senator claimed as his own than about the ideas expressed. Commenting on the Supreme Court's decision upholding the Affordable Care Act, Senator Paul said, "Just because a couple people on the Supreme Court declare something to be 'constitutional' does not make it so. " I am not sure how the senator defines "a couple," but in the Supreme Court decision he refers to a majority of five justices voted to uphold the health care law enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama.
NEWS
By Kevin M. Brien | May 4, 2014
Twenty-two years ago at the end of a semester of teaching an Intro to Philosophy course, I received an unforgettable wake-up call on the issue of plagiarism. During the reading period between the final class session and the final exam, I discovered two blatant cases of plagiarized papers - I knew the books from which these papers had been copied whole cloth. So on exam day, and with apologies to those uninvolved, I brought the issue into the open. Without naming the offenders, I told the class that I expected the students who plagiarized to meet with me privately.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
UPDATE: See end of post for update on another journalist saying Zakaria "borrowed heavily" from him. Following the lead of Time magazine, CNN Friday suspended Sunday morning show host and international affairs analyst Fareed Zakaria for plagiarism. The magazine said its suspension was for a month "pending further review," while CNN put no time limit on its removal of Zakaria from its airwaves. Plagiarism used to be a deadly journalistic sin from which there often was no redemption.  Given the lack of values and ethics in journalism today, however, who knows what will happen to Zakaria.
NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | May 13, 1993
Walter W. Stewart and Ned Feder have created a device whose birth students have dreaded for as long as there have been term papers: a plagiarism-sniffing machine.But Mr. Stewart, a chemist, and Dr. Feder, a physician and cell biologist, have discovered that sometimes the world doesn't put down its clubs after beating a path to the door of better mouse trap builders.After some big-name scientists and a prominent historian complained that their exposes were giving scholarship a bad name, the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, where Mr. Stewart and Dr. Feder were researchers, told them that their laboratory was being closed.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 17, 2002
ONCE UPON a time, there was a very little boy with a very large forehead who lived in West Baltimore. One day his mommy moved him and his five brothers and sisters to the Forest Park section of Northwest Baltimore. The kid with the big forehead - me - attended Mordechai Gist Elementary School. As a sixth-grader, I and the rest of the class were given an assignment: Write an original story. My lazy, no-good bum side got the better of me. Rather than think of an original story, I decided to repeat one I'd read in a book when I attended one of the schools in my old neighborhood.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2003
A Naval Academy professor who was accused of plagiarism will get a chance to revise his book, which was withdrawn from bookstores this week. Michael Pietsch of Little, Brown and Co., said yesterday that he had taken the rare step of recalling Pandora's Keepers: Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb to give author Brian VanDeMark time to make revisions. The book will be reissued in paperback within a year. "Brian VanDeMark is a very serious researcher and writer, and he wrote an excellent book in which there are errors of omission," Pietsch said in a phone interview.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
A Naval Academy history professor accused of plagiarizing portions of his book on the atomic bomb was punished yesterday with a demotion, a loss of tenure and a hefty pay cut. The military college said yesterday that its five-month inquiry into the book by professor Brian VanDeMark concluded that the numerous phrases similar or identical to those of other authors were a result of "gross carelessness," not deliberate theft. "It was just very sloppy scholarship," William C. Miller, the college's academic dean and provost, said in an interview.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
A Denver-based scholarly librarian leveled plagiarism allegations against a Towson University professor after doing research for his watchdog blog and alerting university officials, journals and The Baltimore Sun. Towson is reviewing the work of legal affairs professor Benjamin A. Neil, who says that he has done nothing wrong and that the issue is a matter of "style and formatting. " Jeffrey Beall, an academic librarian at the University of Colorado, Denver, specializes in scrutinizing publishers who make content available for free online but require authors to pay a fee when their articles are accepted into a journal.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | April 1, 2013
Just hours after The Baltimore Sun broke the news that a longtime Towson University professor, Benjamin Neil, was under investigation for allegations that he plagiarized several of his academic articles, the city schools ethics panel webpage underwent a rapid revision. The Sun had been investigating several of Neil's papers for more than a week when it received word that Neil, who had denied any wrongdoing in a March 25 interview, had resigned his post as the chair of the school district's ethics panel.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Yesterday, writing at Poynter.org , Roy Peter Clark suggested that our current attitudes about plagiarism have conflated relatively minor or innocuous literary borrowings with serious thefts. One of the points he identified was the clamor about self-plagiarism. After quoting him, I'd like to add some observations. Actually, he begins by quoting Judge Richard A. Posner 's Little Book of Plagiarism : "Posner hits the target on this one: 'The temptation to lump distinct practices in with plagiarism should be resisted for the sake of clarity; "self-plagiarism," for example, should be recognized as a distinct practice and rarely an objectionable one.' All successful writers 're-purpose' their work for profit and influence, but they should always be forthright with potential publishers on whether the work is brand new or recycled.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
A longtime Towson University professor has resigned his post as the head of the city school system's ethics panel amid allegations that his published academic articles contain content from dozens of sources without proper - or in some cases any - attribution. University officials and journal publishers say they are reviewing several articles submitted by Benjamin A. Neil, a legal affairs professor, after a librarian at another university alerted them to the issue. A Baltimore Sun review of five papers published by Neil shows passages with identical language and others with close similarities to scholarly journals, news publications, congressional testimony, blogs and websites.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
UPDATE: See end of post for update on another journalist saying Zakaria "borrowed heavily" from him. Following the lead of Time magazine, CNN Friday suspended Sunday morning show host and international affairs analyst Fareed Zakaria for plagiarism. The magazine said its suspension was for a month "pending further review," while CNN put no time limit on its removal of Zakaria from its airwaves. Plagiarism used to be a deadly journalistic sin from which there often was no redemption.  Given the lack of values and ethics in journalism today, however, who knows what will happen to Zakaria.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | February 19, 2008
For being "just words," they're sure stirring up some controversy. Critics of Sen. Barack Obama are pointing to the similarity between one of the Democratic presidential hopeful's signature speeches and an address that Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick gave in 2006. Although Patrick, who is close with Obama and shares his heavyweight political adviser, says he gave his friend permission to borrow his lines, that isn't stopping accusations of plagiarism. Last weekend in Wisconsin, responding to statements from rival Sen. Hillary Clinton that she offers solutions while Obama merely "makes speeches," Obama told a stirred-up crowd, "Don't tell me words don't matter."
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | February 19, 2008
For being "just words," they're sure stirring up some controversy. Critics of Sen. Barack Obama are pointing to the similarity between one of the Democratic presidential hopeful's signature speeches and an address that Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick gave in 2006. Although Patrick, who is close with Obama and shares his heavyweight political adviser, says he gave his friend permission to borrow his lines, that isn't stopping accusations of plagiarism. Last weekend in Wisconsin, responding to statements from rival Sen. Hillary Clinton that she offers solutions while Obama merely "makes speeches," Obama told a stirred-up crowd, "Don't tell me words don't matter."
FEATURES
By Chris Lee and Chris Lee,Los Angeles Times | July 12, 2007
July is shaping up to be the cruelest month for Avril Lavigne. Over the past two weeks, the pop princess' carefully crafted image as the anti-Britney Spears - that is, a chart-topping ingenue who writes her own songs, spits at paparazzi and has shaped her own spiky-yet-vulnerable image - has come under attack on multiple fronts. In a lawsuit made public last week, the 22-year-old Canadian superstar is being sued for copyright infringement. She's accused of plagiarizing a substantial part of "I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend," a song by '70s new wave group the Rubinoos, for her hit "Girlfriend."
NEWS
By Jonathan Kirsch and Jonathan Kirsch,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
The Little Book of Plagiarism By Richard A. Posner Pantheon / 116 pages / $10.95 At 116 pages - and small pages at that - Richard A. Posner's The Little Book of Plagiarism is aptly titled. It's a brief but provocative and illuminating meditation on the current craze for searching out, denouncing and punishing authors who appear to have borrowed the work of others and passed it off as their own. Ever the controversialist, Posner is willing to entertain the idea that plagiarism is hardly the high crime that moralists in the news media and the academy advertise it as, and he makes a good case for the notion that copying is (and always has been)
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