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By Arlene Karidis, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
A nimals have done it since the beginning of time. Women in Asia and Africa have done it for centuries. But lately, more women in Western cultures are turning to an ancient practice.  Following childbirth, they are ingesting their placenta - after it's been steamed, dehydrated and put into capsules.  These new mothers and some health practitioners say this tissue, which nourishes the baby in utero, can also nourish the mother. Limited published research suggests ingesting the placenta, or placentophagia, also helps with lactation and postpartum depression because of the hormones it contains.  The idea has gained popularity as celebrities share their experiences with placenta.
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By Arlene Karidis, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
A nimals have done it since the beginning of time. Women in Asia and Africa have done it for centuries. But lately, more women in Western cultures are turning to an ancient practice.  Following childbirth, they are ingesting their placenta - after it's been steamed, dehydrated and put into capsules.  These new mothers and some health practitioners say this tissue, which nourishes the baby in utero, can also nourish the mother. Limited published research suggests ingesting the placenta, or placentophagia, also helps with lactation and postpartum depression because of the hormones it contains.  The idea has gained popularity as celebrities share their experiences with placenta.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Stacy Keibler plans to take a special supplement after she gives birth next month -- a pill made from her placenta. The Rosedale native and host of "Supermarket Superstar" is among a growing number of women who are returning to the ancient practice of consuming the placenta , the organ which nourishes the fetus during pregnancy. Most other mammals eat the placenta immediately after birth, as do many women in some Asian and African cultures.  Some believe that consuming the placenta can ward off postpartum depression, boost energy and speed healing, although few studies have been conducted.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Stacy Keibler plans to take a special supplement after she gives birth next month -- a pill made from her placenta. The Rosedale native and host of "Supermarket Superstar" is among a growing number of women who are returning to the ancient practice of consuming the placenta , the organ which nourishes the fetus during pregnancy. Most other mammals eat the placenta immediately after birth, as do many women in some Asian and African cultures.  Some believe that consuming the placenta can ward off postpartum depression, boost energy and speed healing, although few studies have been conducted.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 19, 1991
About to give birth to her first baby, a 33-year-old Baltimore County woman thought she was going to die.Dr. Charles T. Canady, struggling to deliver her full-term baby under rare and adverse conditions at Sinai Hospital, had answered honestly when she insisted on knowing what she was up against.He had told her there was at least a 20 percent chance she would not make it. Actually, he was sweating out a potential catastrophe -- the loss of both the mother and the baby.That was nine days ago.But, today, the mother -- who does not want to be identified -- and her 6-pound, 4-ounce baby boy are alive and well after having made a little bit of medical history.
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By Donna Alvarado and Donna Alvarado,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 20, 1994
We've had test-tube babies, we've had grandmothers giving birth -- and now we have a man, Arnold Schwarzenegger, getting pregnant.Instead of biceps, it's Mr. Schwarzenegger's belly that bulges in his latest movie, "Junior," in which he plays a fertility researcher who bears a baby. Only in Hollywood? Maybe not. Fertility experts say the idea, although risky, is technically possible.In rare cases, some women without uteri have had babies. So it's only a little more of a stretch -- so to speak -- for men to do the same.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain | March 31, 2011
He was going to be named Nicholas. Or as the lineup card might declare, Nick McGee. "It's funny," Mike McGee said. "I wanted a name that sounds good in sports, and Annika wanted a name that looked good on the business card. " He's William McGee now — Will for short. Change of plans. And whether he lights up the scoreboard or makes Fortune 500 standing — or something a little less — Mike McGee and wife Annika Sorenstam already know the newest family member is a battler.
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By Robin Givhan and Robin Givhan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 6, 1991
Pity those who follow these 'leaders'We were breezing through the March issue of Bazaar when we spotted a story about "The Fashion 50." The story promised to tell us about the 50 women who start and end trends. They are not necessarily the best-dressed, the story cautioned; it's just that when they wear chartreuse, so do the masses.Of course, there are the usual suspects such as model-actress Isabella Rossellini, singer Janet Jackson, models Iman and Naomi Campbell, designer Donna Karan, designer/social butterfly Paloma Picasso, eternal gamine Audrey Hepburn and fashion muse Donatella Versace.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 18, 1996
NEW YORK -- Blood from a newborn infant's umbilical cord and placenta, normally discarded in the delivery room, can provide urgently needed treatment for patients with leukemia and other diseases that damage the blood and immune system, scientists reported yesterday.In a study published in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, and announced at a news conference at the New York Blood Center in Manhattan, researchers from Duke University and the blood center said blood from the umbilical cord and the placenta had successfully taken the place of bone-marrow transplantation in 25 patients, mostly children.
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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | June 21, 1994
In the past several decades, medical science has developed new ways to monitor the health and development of fetuses. It now is possible to detect disease, defects and other genetic disorders in the womb, a feat not possible a generation ago. These modern procedures give both the physician and the pregnant woman a literal insight into the health of the developing fetus.As with any medical procedure, prenatal testing is most effective when women have a clear, informed understanding of its purposes, benefits, risks and costs.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain | March 31, 2011
He was going to be named Nicholas. Or as the lineup card might declare, Nick McGee. "It's funny," Mike McGee said. "I wanted a name that sounds good in sports, and Annika wanted a name that looked good on the business card. " He's William McGee now — Will for short. Change of plans. And whether he lights up the scoreboard or makes Fortune 500 standing — or something a little less — Mike McGee and wife Annika Sorenstam already know the newest family member is a battler.
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By Donna Alvarado and Donna Alvarado,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 20, 1994
We've had test-tube babies, we've had grandmothers giving birth -- and now we have a man, Arnold Schwarzenegger, getting pregnant.Instead of biceps, it's Mr. Schwarzenegger's belly that bulges in his latest movie, "Junior," in which he plays a fertility researcher who bears a baby. Only in Hollywood? Maybe not. Fertility experts say the idea, although risky, is technically possible.In rare cases, some women without uteri have had babies. So it's only a little more of a stretch -- so to speak -- for men to do the same.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 19, 1991
About to give birth to her first baby, a 33-year-old Baltimore County woman thought she was going to die.Dr. Charles T. Canady, struggling to deliver her full-term baby under rare and adverse conditions at Sinai Hospital, had answered honestly when she insisted on knowing what she was up against.He had told her there was at least a 20 percent chance she would not make it. Actually, he was sweating out a potential catastrophe -- the loss of both the mother and the baby.That was nine days ago.But, today, the mother -- who does not want to be identified -- and her 6-pound, 4-ounce baby boy are alive and well after having made a little bit of medical history.
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By Linell Smith | June 22, 1993
Since 1976, the Food and Drug Administration has regulated home medical tests through its Center for Devices and Radiological Health. The following categories of tests are currently approved:* Glucose monitoring kits ($69-$169) permit diabetics to measure glucose (sugar) in their blood. The test allows them to track blood-sugar levels and adjust dietary and insulin needs. The tests are not intended to diagnose diabetes.* Pregnancy test kits ($8-$19) detect human chorionic gonadotropin in urine.
NEWS
By Lauren Eisenberg Davis | September 2, 2010
You can't be serious, people said, when I announced my intention to spend the better part of the weekend at the Maryland State Fair. True, I no longer had small children. Who, then, would be clamoring for more tickets to go on more rides, more cash to buy more deep-fried snacks? Therein lies the error. The fair is not about the rides and the greasy food — at least not to me. If you want rides, go to Hershey Park. The State Fair is an agricultural festival. It's all about the animals.
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