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Placebo Effect

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By JUDY FOREMAN | February 10, 2006
A spate of recent studies demonstrating the powerful effect of placebos, or fake treatments, reinforces the idea that what we think about our medical care really can affect our health. The new research, particularly studies using the latest in brain scanning technology, is giving scientists the most detailed and direct evidence yet into how expectations - beliefs about whether a treatment will work - can have an actual, observable effect in patients' brains and on their well-being. In one study, researchers hooked 14 healthy young men up to PET scanners that monitored changes in brain function.
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NEWS
March 18, 2013
I read with curiosity the Marta Mossburg column regarding the Baltimore Ravens ("Faith fuels 'mighty men' of Baltimore," March 13). Without a doubt, I would estimate that 95 percent of the Baltimore area is thrilled with the success of our Ravens. Is Ms. Mossburg attributing the Ravens' success to their faith in what they have deemed beneficial or to some intrinsic, prejudiced and magical power of the Judeo/Christian Bible and Christianity? There is a huge difference. The power of belief is undeniable.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 8, 2008
For years, experts have known that placebos - fake injections and pills with no real medication - can improve the health of patients with pain, asthma, high blood pressure and angina. Now they've learned that raising the price of a fake pill makes it work even better. A report this week in The Journal of the American Medical Association shows that expectations - shaped by factors that include the price of a medication - play a key role in how we respond to pain relievers and our response to therapies for depression, cancer, stroke or heart attack.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 8, 2008
For years, experts have known that placebos - fake injections and pills with no real medication - can improve the health of patients with pain, asthma, high blood pressure and angina. Now they've learned that raising the price of a fake pill makes it work even better. A report this week in The Journal of the American Medical Association shows that expectations - shaped by factors that include the price of a medication - play a key role in how we respond to pain relievers and our response to therapies for depression, cancer, stroke or heart attack.
NEWS
By Stacey Burling and Stacey Burling,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | July 28, 2002
When Daniel Moer-man's back begins hurting, he reaches for a bottle of Advil, but he pauses a moment to talk to them before swallowing them. "You are the best pills in the world," the University of Michigan-Dearborn anthropologist tells them. "This pain is going to go, and I'm only going to need two, not three." He pauses again to think about the medicine spreading through his body before he washes the two pills down with a glass of water. What Moerman is attempting to do -- and he says it works -- is use the placebo effect to make his Advil work better.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1999
For eons doctors have advised patients to take two aspirins and call back in the morning. Now researchers are trying to find out whether the patient would do as well to skip the aspirin but, yes, call back.The placebo effect, the nonspecific reason people respond to treatments that are not proven to work on their disease -- treatments as simple as talking to a doctor -- has suffered from a bad reputation. But a small but stalwart group of researchers are looking for ways to convince medical researchers to pay it homage.
NEWS
By JEANNINE STEIN and JEANNINE STEIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
Can "super-oxygenated" water make people run faster? Yes - if they think it can. The water, marketed under different brands, is marketed as having more oxygen content than regular tap water and, thus, the ability to enhance athletic performance - claims that have been debunked by scientists who consider it no more than nicely packaged snake oil. In a new study, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse showed a video about the water's purported...
NEWS
March 18, 2013
I read with curiosity the Marta Mossburg column regarding the Baltimore Ravens ("Faith fuels 'mighty men' of Baltimore," March 13). Without a doubt, I would estimate that 95 percent of the Baltimore area is thrilled with the success of our Ravens. Is Ms. Mossburg attributing the Ravens' success to their faith in what they have deemed beneficial or to some intrinsic, prejudiced and magical power of the Judeo/Christian Bible and Christianity? There is a huge difference. The power of belief is undeniable.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,JEF DAUBER/STAFF GRAPHICStaff Writer | November 28, 1993
When E. J. Roberts seeks respite from the disabling fatigue caused by AIDS, he dons a green paper coverall, green paper shoes and a plastic hood that looks like a space helmet. He enters a steel chamber resembling a small submarine.As oxygen is piped into his hood, the 24-year-old Essex resident says he sits back and passes the time by singing show tunes.The chamber belongs to Life Force, a clinic set up three months ago in a former Mount Vernon art gallery. Mr. Roberts and others infected with the human immunodeficiency virus come here from as far away as North Carolina for treatment at $125 per session.
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | June 5, 1991
Boston -- WHITE HOUSE doctors are concerned that George and Barbara Bush have Graves' disease.The Secret Service was dispatched to find how much iodine and lithium is in the drinking water at the White House, Bush's residences in Kennebunkport, Me., and Camp David, Md., and his former vice- presidential home at the Naval Observatory."
NEWS
By JEANNINE STEIN and JEANNINE STEIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
Can "super-oxygenated" water make people run faster? Yes - if they think it can. The water, marketed under different brands, is marketed as having more oxygen content than regular tap water and, thus, the ability to enhance athletic performance - claims that have been debunked by scientists who consider it no more than nicely packaged snake oil. In a new study, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse showed a video about the water's purported...
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | February 10, 2006
A spate of recent studies demonstrating the powerful effect of placebos, or fake treatments, reinforces the idea that what we think about our medical care really can affect our health. The new research, particularly studies using the latest in brain scanning technology, is giving scientists the most detailed and direct evidence yet into how expectations - beliefs about whether a treatment will work - can have an actual, observable effect in patients' brains and on their well-being. In one study, researchers hooked 14 healthy young men up to PET scanners that monitored changes in brain function.
NEWS
By Stacey Burling and Stacey Burling,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | July 28, 2002
When Daniel Moer-man's back begins hurting, he reaches for a bottle of Advil, but he pauses a moment to talk to them before swallowing them. "You are the best pills in the world," the University of Michigan-Dearborn anthropologist tells them. "This pain is going to go, and I'm only going to need two, not three." He pauses again to think about the medicine spreading through his body before he washes the two pills down with a glass of water. What Moerman is attempting to do -- and he says it works -- is use the placebo effect to make his Advil work better.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1999
For eons doctors have advised patients to take two aspirins and call back in the morning. Now researchers are trying to find out whether the patient would do as well to skip the aspirin but, yes, call back.The placebo effect, the nonspecific reason people respond to treatments that are not proven to work on their disease -- treatments as simple as talking to a doctor -- has suffered from a bad reputation. But a small but stalwart group of researchers are looking for ways to convince medical researchers to pay it homage.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,JEF DAUBER/STAFF GRAPHICStaff Writer | November 28, 1993
When E. J. Roberts seeks respite from the disabling fatigue caused by AIDS, he dons a green paper coverall, green paper shoes and a plastic hood that looks like a space helmet. He enters a steel chamber resembling a small submarine.As oxygen is piped into his hood, the 24-year-old Essex resident says he sits back and passes the time by singing show tunes.The chamber belongs to Life Force, a clinic set up three months ago in a former Mount Vernon art gallery. Mr. Roberts and others infected with the human immunodeficiency virus come here from as far away as North Carolina for treatment at $125 per session.
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | June 5, 1991
Boston -- WHITE HOUSE doctors are concerned that George and Barbara Bush have Graves' disease.The Secret Service was dispatched to find how much iodine and lithium is in the drinking water at the White House, Bush's residences in Kennebunkport, Me., and Camp David, Md., and his former vice- presidential home at the Naval Observatory."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 5, 1995
The tranquilizer Xanax can relieve the tension, irritability and aches of severe premenstrual syndrome, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center researchers say.Their study, published in Wednesday's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, also found that the hormone progesterone is not particularly effective in treating PMS, even though it has been widely prescribed for that purpose for more than a decade.Coming on the heels of a study that found Prozac can help with severe PMS, the new research offers yet more insight into the hormonal and nervous system interactions that trigger the mysterious malady.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun Reporter | January 24, 2008
R. Barker Bausell says he arrived at the University of Maryland's alternative medicine center with an open mind toward exploring the potential of acupuncture, herbal remedies and other unconventional treatments. But after five years as research director, he quit the Center for Integrative Medicine in 2004, convinced of one thing: None of the alternative treatments he has seen works any better than a placebo. "They can go on forever" conducting studies, Bausell said recently in his office at UM's School of Nursing, where he is a professor.
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