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By HAL PIPER | January 23, 1993
Doctors describe a ''placebo effect'' that may sometimesresult when a patient gets better without treatment, so long as he thinks his condition is receiving medical attention. Placebo dieting has been my strategy for years.We who enjoy, er, robust health fall into two groups, one of which is actively dieting. I am in the other, the control group. I don't actually do anything about my physique, but perhaps secret shame, reinforced by the unremitting mockery of my children, will produce a placebo effect.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 8, 2008
For years, experts have known that placebos - fake injections and pills with no real medication - can improve the health of patients with pain, asthma, high blood pressure and angina. Now they've learned that raising the price of a fake pill makes it work even better. A report this week in The Journal of the American Medical Association shows that expectations - shaped by factors that include the price of a medication - play a key role in how we respond to pain relievers and our response to therapies for depression, cancer, stroke or heart attack.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Using brain scans, acupuncture and the nasty stuff that puts the sting in pepper spray, researchers are learning how placebos play out in our brains. These innocuous medications - long used as decoys in clinical drug trials - aren't supposed to have real chemical effect on the body. But experience over the years has taught doctors that some patients who take placebos experience real relief. Now brain scans show that when test subjects think a placebo is a real medication or treatment, the expectation of relief can release natural painkillers.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun Reporter | January 24, 2008
R. Barker Bausell says he arrived at the University of Maryland's alternative medicine center with an open mind toward exploring the potential of acupuncture, herbal remedies and other unconventional treatments. But after five years as research director, he quit the Center for Integrative Medicine in 2004, convinced of one thing: None of the alternative treatments he has seen works any better than a placebo. "They can go on forever" conducting studies, Bausell said recently in his office at UM's School of Nursing, where he is a professor.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2004
There might be something to positive thinking after all - and it's not just in your head. Researchers at the University of Michigan, Princeton and several other universities say that electronic signals fired off in the brains of 48 volunteers show that the brain reacts differently to pain when someone is given a placebo and believes in it. "How much the placebo effect is felt correlates with how much you believe," said Tor D. Wager, lead author of...
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | April 17, 2007
A dietary supplement widely used for achy joints does little if anything to relieve arthritic pain, according to researchers who found that chondroitin is no more effective than a placebo. The Swiss researchers combined results from recent large-scale studies on chondroitin's effectiveness and say their results overshadow smaller, less rigorous studies that suggested a benefit. "The longer you look and the more rigorously you look, the less effect you see," said Dr. Peter J?ni, an epidemiologist at Switzerland's University of Bern and an author of the new study.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2007
Neurochem Inc. Shares declined $2.40 to $3.16 after the drug developer said a study of its Alzheimer's disease drug candidate Alzhemed did not show a statistically significant benefit, compared with a placebo.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | July 4, 1995
Q: I have tried many different remedies but continue to be terribly irritable before each menstrual period. Is it true that there is a new treatment for this problem?A: A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine reported the results of a Canadian study on the treatment of premenstrual syndrome with fluoxetine (Prozac). Surveys have shown that between 3 percent and 8 percent of North American women suffer from premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms, which may begin seven to 10 days before menstrual periods and end soon after the onset of menstrual flow, include increased tension, irritability, agitation, difficulty sleeping and fatigue.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | October 27, 1992
Q: I have read about the benefits of aspirin for the prevention of heart attacks but have hesitated to take it regularly because of my diabetes. Is aspirin safe in people with diabetes?A: A study of 3,711 diabetic patients between the ages of 18 and 70 found that daily aspirin, compared with a placebo, produced a small but significant decrease in the frequency of fatal and non-fatal heart attacks over a five- to seven-year period. There was no difference between the two groups in the overall death rate.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1994
Q: My son is hyperactive and a friend suggested that this can be caused by an allergy to aspartame. We do let him drink a lot of diet soda so I wonder if he should be tested.A: Many parents of hyperactive children (the term doctors now tend to use is attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity) wonder whether additives in food could be responsible for their children's condition. To date, however, scientists have not been able to establish any clear-cut relationship between these additives and the observed behavior.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2007
Neurochem Inc. Shares declined $2.40 to $3.16 after the drug developer said a study of its Alzheimer's disease drug candidate Alzhemed did not show a statistically significant benefit, compared with a placebo.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | April 17, 2007
A dietary supplement widely used for achy joints does little if anything to relieve arthritic pain, according to researchers who found that chondroitin is no more effective than a placebo. The Swiss researchers combined results from recent large-scale studies on chondroitin's effectiveness and say their results overshadow smaller, less rigorous studies that suggested a benefit. "The longer you look and the more rigorously you look, the less effect you see," said Dr. Peter J?ni, an epidemiologist at Switzerland's University of Bern and an author of the new study.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | December 23, 2006
When Vanda Pharmaceuticals Inc., a Rockville drug company with no products on the market, reported a successful study of an experimental schizophrenia drug on Dec. 7, its shares soared as much as 85 percent that day. Four days later, six Vanda insiders, including Chief Executive Officer Mihael H. Polymeropoulos, sold $43 million in stock, or about 7.5 percent of the company, according to regulatory filings. A venture capital firm whose general partners include Vanda Chairman Argeris N. Karabelas sold $19.3 million in Vanda stock on Dec. 11 and 12. Neither Vanda nor its backers told investors that the pill previously had been cast aside by three drugmakers, including Novartis AG, Dr. Polymeropoulos' former employer.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Using brain scans, acupuncture and the nasty stuff that puts the sting in pepper spray, researchers are learning how placebos play out in our brains. These innocuous medications - long used as decoys in clinical drug trials - aren't supposed to have real chemical effect on the body. But experience over the years has taught doctors that some patients who take placebos experience real relief. Now brain scans show that when test subjects think a placebo is a real medication or treatment, the expectation of relief can release natural painkillers.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | July 28, 2006
My daughter is entering puberty and dealing with the usual underarm body odors. We tried many different deodorants and antiperspirants, to no avail. I figured if Listerine killed the germs that cause bad breath, it might kill the bacteria that cause underarm odor. I checked with the pediatrician first to make sure it would be safe. Sure enough, Listerine works. She applies it after showering, lets it dry and then applies an antiperspirant. She can go just about the entire day without any odor.
NEWS
By JEANNINE STEIN and JEANNINE STEIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
Can "super-oxygenated" water make people run faster? Yes - if they think it can. The water, marketed under different brands, is marketed as having more oxygen content than regular tap water and, thus, the ability to enhance athletic performance - claims that have been debunked by scientists who consider it no more than nicely packaged snake oil. In a new study, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse showed a video about the water's purported...
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | January 19, 1994
Washington.--Politicians and the public are recoiling at revelations of government-sponsored nuclear experiments on unwitting victims in the early post-war period. But rogue science conducted with official blessings is not merely a historical relic. It continues today, despite a multitude of safeguards designed to assure compliance with rules of informed consent and the first canon of medicine: Do no harm.Consider, for example, trials of vaccines for pertussis, or whooping cough, financed last year in Italy and Sweden by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, renowned as the world's leading biomedical-research institution.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | February 10, 2006
A spate of recent studies demonstrating the powerful effect of placebos, or fake treatments, reinforces the idea that what we think about our medical care really can affect our health. The new research, particularly studies using the latest in brain scanning technology, is giving scientists the most detailed and direct evidence yet into how expectations - beliefs about whether a treatment will work - can have an actual, observable effect in patients' brains and on their well-being. In one study, researchers hooked 14 healthy young men up to PET scanners that monitored changes in brain function.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2004
There might be something to positive thinking after all - and it's not just in your head. Researchers at the University of Michigan, Princeton and several other universities say that electronic signals fired off in the brains of 48 volunteers show that the brain reacts differently to pain when someone is given a placebo and believes in it. "How much the placebo effect is felt correlates with how much you believe," said Tor D. Wager, lead author of...
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