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NEWS
April 21, 2001
THE NATION'S new center of population, according to the 2000 federal census, is once more in Missouri but farther south and west -- deeper in the Ozarks. The population center, which crossed the Mississippi in 1980, had been near DeSoto and then Steelville. Now the nearest road junction is said to be Edgar Springs. Lower Missouri does have its special place names -- Annapolis, Liberal, Plato, Herculaneum Humansville. The Ozark Plateau, with its forests and folkways, is sometimes thought of as West Appalachia.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
You may want to grab a paper bag to breathe into in case this post provokes hyperventilation. Apostrophes are not all that important. This insight came to me as I was reading an important distinction that Geoffrey Pullum makes at Lingua Franca : "The apostrophe is  not  a punctuation mark. It doesn't punctuate. Punctuation marks are placed between units (sentences, clauses, phrases, words, morphemes) to signal structure, boundaries, or pauses. The apostrophe appears within words.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
You may want to grab a paper bag to breathe into in case this post provokes hyperventilation. Apostrophes are not all that important. This insight came to me as I was reading an important distinction that Geoffrey Pullum makes at Lingua Franca : "The apostrophe is  not  a punctuation mark. It doesn't punctuate. Punctuation marks are placed between units (sentences, clauses, phrases, words, morphemes) to signal structure, boundaries, or pauses. The apostrophe appears within words.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
You will excuse me for not getting exercised over the decision by Waterstone's the British bookseller, to drop the apostrophe from its name.* The Apostrophe Protection Society appears to have its knickers in a twist, as it has in the past over Harrods. Not me. The society has its work cut out for it. The semicolon has its defenders, and needs them, because that punctuation mark appears to inspire dislike or unease. The lowly comma - It's a pause mark! It's a syntax mark! It's both!
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 6, 1994
CUPIDS, Newfoundland -- It was barrel-makers, not the cherubic shooter of love's barbed arrow, that gave this Conception Bay settlement its name. The doughty Englishmen who first waded ashore in 1610, or those soon to follow, included coopers -- makers of wooden casks to contain rum and salt cod.And so the place came to be called Coopers.But Newfoundlanders' pronunciation of the mother language always has been as rough and rugged as the wind-scoured, sea-battered island they inhabit. And Newfies haven't traditionally reverenced precise spelling.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
You will excuse me for not getting exercised over the decision by Waterstone's the British bookseller, to drop the apostrophe from its name.* The Apostrophe Protection Society appears to have its knickers in a twist, as it has in the past over Harrods. Not me. The society has its work cut out for it. The semicolon has its defenders, and needs them, because that punctuation mark appears to inspire dislike or unease. The lowly comma - It's a pause mark! It's a syntax mark! It's both!
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Bready and James Bready,Special to the Sun | November 9, 2003
Hunt country, up there in Worthington and nearby valleys, acreages, manor houses, woods, streams, fences, horses, dogs, foxes, pinks (the gentleman's scarlet coat, worn in hunts and at balls) and money -- hunt country isn't normally thought of as home to authors. But Meg Waite Clayton, now of California, earlier spent four years there. Her photographer's eye and her writer's eye and ear were recording all the while; the result is The Language of Light (St. Martin's, 324 pages, $24.95), Clayton's first novel.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 1999
GRAY OWL Garth. Phantom Court. Coon Hunt Court. Columbians have endured the snickers of outsiders over the names of our streets for decades.But few know how our unique names for roads and villages came to be.Contrary to a rumor circulating when Columbia was being developed, the street names were not concocted by a reclusive old lady who was paid $100 per name.Barbara Kellner, manager of the Columbia Welcome Center and the Columbia Archives, said the system for naming Columbia's streets came into being because of a postal regulation restricting the use by the new town of names existing in the surrounding counties.
NEWS
March 6, 1992
Last weekend, while the golf world was focused on the Los Angeles Open and young Eldrick "Tiger" Woods, Crofton's own Gary Carpenter was posting some impressive numbers of his own at the Woodlands Country Club in Houston.Playing at the seventh and final stop of the ESPN-sponsored Junior Tour, Carpenter turned in a two-round total of 151, earning third place in a 140-player field.Carpenter's third-place finish at Woodlands, combined with an early season second at Marco Island, Fla., and an 18th-place finish in Phoenix, Ariz.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 26, 1999
LONDON -- NATO's admission that it may have bombed a Kosovo Liberation Army base because of a spelling error illustrates the pitfalls of language in this war.Although Western correspondents had reported for three weeks that the KLA had wrested control of the base at Kosare from the Serbs, and television crews filmed KLA fighters there last week, NATO spokesman Jamie P. Shea said the base may have been targeted because its name was misspelled and NATO planners...
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Bready and James Bready,Special to the Sun | November 9, 2003
Hunt country, up there in Worthington and nearby valleys, acreages, manor houses, woods, streams, fences, horses, dogs, foxes, pinks (the gentleman's scarlet coat, worn in hunts and at balls) and money -- hunt country isn't normally thought of as home to authors. But Meg Waite Clayton, now of California, earlier spent four years there. Her photographer's eye and her writer's eye and ear were recording all the while; the result is The Language of Light (St. Martin's, 324 pages, $24.95), Clayton's first novel.
NEWS
April 21, 2001
THE NATION'S new center of population, according to the 2000 federal census, is once more in Missouri but farther south and west -- deeper in the Ozarks. The population center, which crossed the Mississippi in 1980, had been near DeSoto and then Steelville. Now the nearest road junction is said to be Edgar Springs. Lower Missouri does have its special place names -- Annapolis, Liberal, Plato, Herculaneum Humansville. The Ozark Plateau, with its forests and folkways, is sometimes thought of as West Appalachia.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2001
A secret list kept by the state is raising concerns among privacy advocates about how far the government should go to prevent child abuse. The state Child Abuse Registry includes the names of about 100,000 people who have never been criminally charged but were the subject of complaints filed by suspicious neighbors, school officials and hospital personnel. State officials say the list, accessible only to state and county social workers, is a critical element in the fight against abuse.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 26, 1999
LONDON -- NATO's admission that it may have bombed a Kosovo Liberation Army base because of a spelling error illustrates the pitfalls of language in this war.Although Western correspondents had reported for three weeks that the KLA had wrested control of the base at Kosare from the Serbs, and television crews filmed KLA fighters there last week, NATO spokesman Jamie P. Shea said the base may have been targeted because its name was misspelled and NATO planners...
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 1999
GRAY OWL Garth. Phantom Court. Coon Hunt Court. Columbians have endured the snickers of outsiders over the names of our streets for decades.But few know how our unique names for roads and villages came to be.Contrary to a rumor circulating when Columbia was being developed, the street names were not concocted by a reclusive old lady who was paid $100 per name.Barbara Kellner, manager of the Columbia Welcome Center and the Columbia Archives, said the system for naming Columbia's streets came into being because of a postal regulation restricting the use by the new town of names existing in the surrounding counties.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 6, 1994
CUPIDS, Newfoundland -- It was barrel-makers, not the cherubic shooter of love's barbed arrow, that gave this Conception Bay settlement its name. The doughty Englishmen who first waded ashore in 1610, or those soon to follow, included coopers -- makers of wooden casks to contain rum and salt cod.And so the place came to be called Coopers.But Newfoundlanders' pronunciation of the mother language always has been as rough and rugged as the wind-scoured, sea-battered island they inhabit. And Newfies haven't traditionally reverenced precise spelling.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2001
A secret list kept by the state is raising concerns among privacy advocates about how far the government should go to prevent child abuse. The state Child Abuse Registry includes the names of about 100,000 people who have never been criminally charged but were the subject of complaints filed by suspicious neighbors, school officials and hospital personnel. State officials say the list, accessible only to state and county social workers, is a critical element in the fight against abuse.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Founded in 1754, the City of Taneytown is the oldest municipality established in Carroll County.The first inhabitants of the area were Indians, mostly of the Tuscarora tribe, who hunted otter, wolves, deer and wildcats in the woodlands. From this early history came such names as Beaver Dam, Monocacy, Otterdale and Bear Branch.Taneytown was named after Raphael Taney, a resident of St. Mary's County who never lived in Taneytown but laid out plans for the city and gave it his name.A popular misconception is that the town was named for former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney.
NEWS
March 6, 1992
Last weekend, while the golf world was focused on the Los Angeles Open and young Eldrick "Tiger" Woods, Crofton's own Gary Carpenter was posting some impressive numbers of his own at the Woodlands Country Club in Houston.Playing at the seventh and final stop of the ESPN-sponsored Junior Tour, Carpenter turned in a two-round total of 151, earning third place in a 140-player field.Carpenter's third-place finish at Woodlands, combined with an early season second at Marco Island, Fla., and an 18th-place finish in Phoenix, Ariz.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Founded in 1754, the City of Taneytown is the oldest municipality established in Carroll County.The first inhabitants of the area were Indians, mostly of the Tuscarora tribe, who hunted otter, wolves, deer and wildcats in the woodlands. From this early history came such names as Beaver Dam, Monocacy, Otterdale and Bear Branch.Taneytown was named after Raphael Taney, a resident of St. Mary's County who never lived in Taneytown but laid out plans for the city and gave it his name.A popular misconception is that the town was named for former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney.
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