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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Two days after a state senator said Maryland Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald's signature child welfare program was "not working," Donald received a warm reception - even applause - when she appeared before another group of lawmakers Thursday. At a briefing for the Joint Committee on Children, Youth and Families, Donald summarized how she believes "Place Matters," which she launched two years ago, is working to improve outcomes for vulnerable children. Under this new approach, the department focuses on reuniting foster children with their own families or keeping them in family settings, which has reduced the state's reliance on group home beds by nearly half.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Devontay Hudson moved from one foster home to another for years, but last month he was adopted by a Millford Mill family - another symbol of a statewide initiative that has sharply reduced the number of children in foster care. The Gilman School sophomore, an aspiring chemical engineer, can't remember how old he was when he entered foster care, and doesn't know much about his birth family. But ask him about his adopted family and the soft-spoken teen says he's glad to be home. "It was a blessing for me to be a part of a family," said Devontay, 15, whose adoption increased the family of Ronald Wilkins and Demetria Jackson-Wilkins to nine members.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | September 30, 2009
The Maryland Department of Human Resources' new effort to place children in family settings rather than in group homes when their parents can't care for them "is not working," a state lawmaker said at a hearing Tuesday. Sen. Joan Carter Conway, chairwoman of the Senate committee that oversees social services, also accused Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald of unfairly putting private group home providers out of business. Conway called Donald to Annapolis to answer questions about her Place Matters strategy, which has resulted in the closings of dozens of group homes.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Two days after a state senator said Maryland Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald's signature child welfare program was "not working," Donald received a warm reception - even applause - when she appeared before another group of lawmakers Thursday. At a briefing for the Joint Committee on Children, Youth and Families, Donald summarized how she believes "Place Matters," which she launched two years ago, is working to improve outcomes for vulnerable children. Under this new approach, the department focuses on reuniting foster children with their own families or keeping them in family settings, which has reduced the state's reliance on group home beds by nearly half.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Devontay Hudson moved from one foster home to another for years, but last month he was adopted by a Millford Mill family - another symbol of a statewide initiative that has sharply reduced the number of children in foster care. The Gilman School sophomore, an aspiring chemical engineer, can't remember how old he was when he entered foster care, and doesn't know much about his birth family. But ask him about his adopted family and the soft-spoken teen says he's glad to be home. "It was a blessing for me to be a part of a family," said Devontay, 15, whose adoption increased the family of Ronald Wilkins and Demetria Jackson-Wilkins to nine members.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | September 4, 1997
MIAMI -- Before last night's game, Rafael Palmeiro said the Orioles would be fine if they split their remaining eight games with New York.They might not even need to win that many.A night that began with an excellent chance of the Orioles' lead reducing to 5 1/2 games ended with it staying at 6 1/2 .They can drop four straight at Yankee Stadium and still lead by 2 1/2 -- and they're not going to lose four straight to a team that just got swept by the Phillies.The New York spin will be that the Yankees would rather face a weak AL Central champion than a strong AL West winner in the first round.
FEATURES
By YOLANDA GARFIELD | October 11, 1992
All year-round, nosegays blossom on the floor borders of this brand-new family room in Bethesda. In this transformed garage, hand-painted flowers bloom on dining chairs, and ramble up the walls between French doors. Even a short, high-traffic hallway leading from the upper-level kitchen to the family room below has been treated to a miniature garden bursting with sunflowers, rosebuds and other joyfuls signs of summer.Claire Howard, a self-taught artist, interior designer and decorative painter, selected a light honey stain for the newly laid floor.
NEWS
October 1, 2009
A hearing in Annapolis this week demonstrated with perfect clarity what the problem has been for all these years in caring for Maryland's most vulnerable children. Sen. Joan Carter Conway declared Tuesday that the Department of Human Resources' new strategy of placing troubled or neglected kids in family settings as opposed to group homes was unfair to the group homes. With all due respect to the group home operators who do a good job, that's just too bad. The children are our concern - not their livelihood.
NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,Olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | July 26, 2009
The Baltimore Department of Social Services found families for 384 children during fiscal 2009, beating its adoption goal for the first time since 2002. Baltimore children count for almost half of Maryland's total adoptions, according to the state Department of Human Resources. Statewide, the department finalized 770 adoptions, topping its goal of 707. "It's a huge accomplishment for our local departments and particularly Baltimore City, which has struggled before to achieve its adoptions goal," Brenda Donald, DHR secretary, said.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
The article by Doug Donovan related to the legislative audit of the Maryland Department of Human Resources ( "Md. agency failed to monitor placement of foster children, audit says," Aug. 20) is missing some important information. It fails to point out the enormous strides made by DHR in recognizing that when children need out-of-home care, relatives are often the best option and that "place matters. " Kinship caregivers are most likely to be known by the children, live locally and minimize the disruption and trauma when they are removed from a parent or parents they love.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | September 30, 2009
The Maryland Department of Human Resources' new effort to place children in family settings rather than in group homes when their parents can't care for them "is not working," a state lawmaker said at a hearing Tuesday. Sen. Joan Carter Conway, chairwoman of the Senate committee that oversees social services, also accused Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald of unfairly putting private group home providers out of business. Conway called Donald to Annapolis to answer questions about her Place Matters strategy, which has resulted in the closings of dozens of group homes.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | September 4, 1997
MIAMI -- Before last night's game, Rafael Palmeiro said the Orioles would be fine if they split their remaining eight games with New York.They might not even need to win that many.A night that began with an excellent chance of the Orioles' lead reducing to 5 1/2 games ended with it staying at 6 1/2 .They can drop four straight at Yankee Stadium and still lead by 2 1/2 -- and they're not going to lose four straight to a team that just got swept by the Phillies.The New York spin will be that the Yankees would rather face a weak AL Central champion than a strong AL West winner in the first round.
FEATURES
By YOLANDA GARFIELD | October 11, 1992
All year-round, nosegays blossom on the floor borders of this brand-new family room in Bethesda. In this transformed garage, hand-painted flowers bloom on dining chairs, and ramble up the walls between French doors. Even a short, high-traffic hallway leading from the upper-level kitchen to the family room below has been treated to a miniature garden bursting with sunflowers, rosebuds and other joyfuls signs of summer.Claire Howard, a self-taught artist, interior designer and decorative painter, selected a light honey stain for the newly laid floor.
NEWS
By Neal Peirce | September 6, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Labor Day and a nine-year peak in worker layoffs helped focus attention on a report that compensation for America's top corporate brass is running out of control -- now 531 times the pay of the average worker. Not only did CEO pay rise a stratospheric 571 percent from 1990 to 2000, the liberally oriented Institute for Policy Studies and United for a Fair Economy said in its report, "Executive Excess 2001," chief executive compensation continued to soar last year even while many of the same executives were firing workers by the thousands and corporate stocks lost 10 percent of their value.
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