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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
The state's power grid operator does not need a $3.3 billion pair of transmission line projects built through Maryland because the weak economy has slowed demand for electricity, the staff of operator PJM Interconnection has concluded. The staff will recommend that PJM's board cancel the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway, or MAPP, and Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, or PATH, because its analysis showed they are not needed to maintain reliability of the power grid, according to a presentation PJM released Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
The state's power grid operator does not need a $3.3 billion pair of transmission line projects built through Maryland because the weak economy has slowed demand for electricity, the staff of operator PJM Interconnection has concluded. The staff will recommend that PJM's board cancel the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway, or MAPP, and Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, or PATH, because its analysis showed they are not needed to maintain reliability of the power grid, according to a presentation PJM released Wednesday.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 16, 2012
Solar power is gaining a toehold in the Mid-Atlantic region.  As of this month, the amount of photovoltaic electric generating capacity installed surpassed 1 gigawatt, according to PJM Interconnection , which oversees the electricity transmission grid stretching from Delaware to northern Illinois and western Kentucky. That's enough - when the sun is shining - to power 800,000 to 1 million homes. Solar capacity has more than doubled in each of the past two years, PJM reports.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 16, 2012
Solar power is gaining a toehold in the Mid-Atlantic region.  As of this month, the amount of photovoltaic electric generating capacity installed surpassed 1 gigawatt, according to PJM Interconnection , which oversees the electricity transmission grid stretching from Delaware to northern Illinois and western Kentucky. That's enough - when the sun is shining - to power 800,000 to 1 million homes. Solar capacity has more than doubled in each of the past two years, PJM reports.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
For two days now, 21 million people in the mid-Atlantic states have skated along the razor's edge of their region's ability to generate or buy electrical power.Homes, businesses and factories lost power for brief periods on Wednesday, and the daily routines of hundreds of thousands of people were disrupted by closures, early shutdowns and late openings that stretched into today.And for about six hours on Wednesday, the rising demand for electricity from 21 million people who woke up to record-breaking arctic cold threatened to overwhelm the generators and transmission lines that most people have come to take for granted.
NEWS
By Dan Ervin | March 14, 2011
In order to continue the economic recovery in Maryland and the U.S., it is necessary to maintain a dependable supply of electricity. This will require three contributing factors: conservation, generation and transmission. Each of these factors is important in different and interrelated ways. Unfortunately, while much attention has been paid in recent years to conservation and generation, little thought has been given to the equally crucial issue of transmission. Energy conservation has enjoyed support by many groups for a long time.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 14, 2011
Economists and big-business types will tell you that government price controls are a loser's game, doomed to harm consumers and producers alike. It's mainly true. President Richard M. Nixon's 1971 price controls caused shortages and failed to snuff inflation. Botched price administration contributed mightily to the fall of the Soviet Union. Electricity price controls drove California utilities into bankruptcy a decade ago. So you might wonder why two weeks ago power companies such as BGE parent Constellation Energy frantically urged Washington to slap price controls on electricity.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
Mild summer weather saved us plenty of dough. The PJM Interconnection, masters of the electric grid for 51 million of us in 13 Eastern states, says electric consumption June through August was 7.5 percent lower than in 2008. Citing National Weather Service statistics, PJM said the amount of juice required for air conditioning fell 14 percent this summer, to a level 7 percent below the average. Small favors.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly | December 29, 2007
American Electric Power and Allegheny Energy said yesterday that they have filed a request with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to approve a rate formula to recover the cost of building a $1.8 billion, 290-mile-long, extra-high-voltage transmission line from West Virginia to Frederick. If the formula is approved, the PJM Interconnection, which operates the regional power grid, would use it to charge utilities in 13 states for the use of energy from that system. Maryland is part of that grid.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Exelon Corp. said Monday that it plans to retire one of its electric generation units in Baltimore County within two-and-a-half years, citing the equipment's age as a key reason. The announcement comes as the Chicago-based energy company is ramping up plans for two new generation units in Harford County, one of the regulatory requirements of its 2012 acquisition of Baltimore's Constellation Energy Group. Exelon said Unit 4 at Riverside Generating Station, a 74-megawatt unit fueled by natural gas, was built 62 years ago and "is not economic to operate due to its age, the escalating costs of maintaining the unit, and declining revenues.
NEWS
By Dan Ervin | March 14, 2011
In order to continue the economic recovery in Maryland and the U.S., it is necessary to maintain a dependable supply of electricity. This will require three contributing factors: conservation, generation and transmission. Each of these factors is important in different and interrelated ways. Unfortunately, while much attention has been paid in recent years to conservation and generation, little thought has been given to the equally crucial issue of transmission. Energy conservation has enjoyed support by many groups for a long time.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 14, 2011
Economists and big-business types will tell you that government price controls are a loser's game, doomed to harm consumers and producers alike. It's mainly true. President Richard M. Nixon's 1971 price controls caused shortages and failed to snuff inflation. Botched price administration contributed mightily to the fall of the Soviet Union. Electricity price controls drove California utilities into bankruptcy a decade ago. So you might wonder why two weeks ago power companies such as BGE parent Constellation Energy frantically urged Washington to slap price controls on electricity.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
For two days now, 21 million people in the mid-Atlantic states have skated along the razor's edge of their region's ability to generate or buy electrical power.Homes, businesses and factories lost power for brief periods on Wednesday, and the daily routines of hundreds of thousands of people were disrupted by closures, early shutdowns and late openings that stretched into today.And for about six hours on Wednesday, the rising demand for electricity from 21 million people who woke up to record-breaking arctic cold threatened to overwhelm the generators and transmission lines that most people have come to take for granted.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Clean Currents, a Silver Spring-based provider of renewable energy for residents and businesses, said Friday it has stopped serving customers after rising wholesale electricity prices in the recent cold snap caused the company to default on payments to its supplier, electricity grid operator PJM Interconnection. Customers, including 6,000 residential and 2,000 commercial, will not see interruptions in service, said Gary Skulnik, co-founder and president. Customers will be returned to their utility service effective immediately and will see the change reflected on one of the next two bills.
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