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NEWS
January 12, 2012
Exposing children to books an early age, be they printed or digital, is vital to fighting the problem of illiteracy in our city ("Some parents say physical books kindle kids' reading," Jan. 7). At Baltimore Reads, we see just how important reading is every day. Since the Baltimore Reads' Book Bank was founded 20 years ago, we have distributed more than 1.5 million children's books free of charge. Reaching out to kids with books helps to break the cycle of illiteracy that plagues our city.
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NEWS
January 12, 2012
Exposing children to books an early age, be they printed or digital, is vital to fighting the problem of illiteracy in our city ("Some parents say physical books kindle kids' reading," Jan. 7). At Baltimore Reads, we see just how important reading is every day. Since the Baltimore Reads' Book Bank was founded 20 years ago, we have distributed more than 1.5 million children's books free of charge. Reaching out to kids with books helps to break the cycle of illiteracy that plagues our city.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lou Dolinar and Lou Dolinar,NEWSDAY | November 2, 1998
Ask a dozen computer users which they'd prefer, a big monitor or a fast computer, and 11 out of 12 will tell you a fast computer.Not me. I love big monitors. The bigger, the brighter, the higher the resolution, the better. So big you have to remodel your office to fit one in (I have). So bright you have to wear sunscreen and a radiation dosimeter badge while you work. Enough resolution to read the fine print in an Arkansas lawyer's prenuptial contract.Big monitors are cool. And they are an affordable luxury this year, with a 19-incher going for as little as $500.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | November 4, 2007
After Rick Calvert started a political blog two years ago, he was startled when other Web logs, including some well-known ones, began linking to his within just a few weeks. He was even more stunned when he called to interview the journalist Fred Barnes about his biography of President Bush and Barnes was available, eager to chat. Then other publishers began sending Calvert their books for him to review. Calvert marveled at the ease of blogging and the authority it bestowed. To think he got into to it mostly to do something smarter with his spare time than play video games.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 27, 2003
When I run game programs on my Toshiba Tecra 8000 laptop, they fill just part of the screen display, about a 7-by-5-inch rectangle. How can I set things up so that the game programs will fill the whole 14.1-inch screen? I've tried changing the pixel dimensions in the Display/Settings/Screen area but that doesn't help. As you've found, the solution doesn't always lie with going to the screen resolution settings tab after right-clicking on the desktop and picking Properties. This is because most Windows computers don't permit settings as low as required for many games - resolutions of 640 by 480 pixels.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | March 2, 1997
I GOT ELECTRONIC mail the other day from a fellow named Dan who installed a new video board in his computer and got a nasty surprise when he turned it on."I bought the video card because it was supposed to give me higher resolution, and I went through all the stuff I was supposed to and installed the programs from the disk that came with it," he said. "But when I started the computer back up, the picture wasn't any better. Everything was just a lot smaller. I could hardly make it out, even with my reading glasses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | February 27, 2003
Today's digital cameras provide terrific resolution at reasonable prices, but if you e-mail photos to friends and family, they may offer too much of a good thing. In fact, I frequently get complaints from people who receive digital photos so large that only a fraction of the image shows up on the screen. Although it isn't hard to turn these pictures into images that can be viewed at a glance, the grandmas and grandpas who are likely to be on the receiving end often have no clue about what to do with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 2, 2002
If you walk around a room full of people using PCs, you'll notice more than a few who seem to be craning their necks and squinting at their screens. This is a sure sign that they're not comfortable using their computers, and that's bad news. Eyestrain is the No. 1 ergonomic hazard involved with extended computer use. Fortunately, it's a problem that's relatively easy to fix with a few simple adjustments to your hardware, software and headware. Even if you think you're comfortable at your machine, pay attention, because what we mistake for comfort is often a case of getting used to a condition that's mildly annoying but can be harmful in the long run. First, look at the height of your monitor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | October 21, 2004
FLAT-PANEL monitors are outselling traditional computer screens these days, even though they're still far more expensive than traditional monitors built around cathode ray tubes. In most buyers' minds, there's a good reason for switching. Flat panels take up a fraction of the front-to-back space of traditional monitors. They use less than a third of the electricity and produce very little heat. And let's be honest - they look cool. Many users also buy into flat-panel monitors because they think they're getting a sharper image, and that's true to a point.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | September 21, 1997
FROM time to time, I like to let the readers take over, and the last few weeks have produced some particularly good questions. So here we go.Q: Please address in your column why monitors cost so much. For example, a 20-inch monitor costs far more than a 32-inch TV set. How come?A: While monitors and TV sets look alike and both display images on cathode ray tubes, the resemblance ends there. Anyone who remembers the days when home computers hooked up to TV sets can tell you that televisions weren't designed to display high-resolution text and graphics.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 18, 2007
When the Gingerbread Man's life flashes before his eyes in Shrek the Third, and icing covers the scars where Lord Farquaad tortured him in Shrek, you're savoring the craft of Larry Cutler, a former Marylander. When thousands of baby Shreks invade the ogre's hovel and somehow look right at home there - that's partly due to the eye of another former Marylander, Jimmy Maidens. Cutler and Maidens belong to the PDI/DreamWorks Animation empire, based in Redwood City, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | May 3, 2007
I have several flash drives and a couple of memory card readers and want to change the automatic-play options that Windows XP offers when I plug them into a USB port. XP will automatically open Windows Explorer - unless there are JPG picture or AVI movie files on the drive. In that case, it opens a window giving me several program choices. I only want to use Windows Explorer, but I have to scroll down to see that "Folder View" option.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | November 30, 2006
I've never run across a new technology that caused more confusion than HDTV. The consumer electronics industry took a simple entertainment device that most of us understand and turned it into a monster with enough specifications, whereases and wherefors to stump a convention of rocket scientists. Hoping to get folks started, last week I offered suggestions for picking the right size set and deciding which HDTV technology is best for you. This time we'll talk about specifications - the geekspeak you need to know to make the right choice.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
You may not know it, but you are adept at lip reading. That's the only conclusion we can draw from new censorship guidelines crafted by lawyers for the Public Broadcasting Service, whose 354 member stations - including Maryland's own MPT - could face hefty fines if they allow you to see someone even mouthing salty language in one of their prime-time shows. Reacting to the Federal Communications Commission's newfound muscle in its campaign against what it considers to be indecent programming and profane language, the lawyers maintain that simply bleeping over certain words is no longer sufficient.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | October 21, 2004
FLAT-PANEL monitors are outselling traditional computer screens these days, even though they're still far more expensive than traditional monitors built around cathode ray tubes. In most buyers' minds, there's a good reason for switching. Flat panels take up a fraction of the front-to-back space of traditional monitors. They use less than a third of the electricity and produce very little heat. And let's be honest - they look cool. Many users also buy into flat-panel monitors because they think they're getting a sharper image, and that's true to a point.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 27, 2003
When I run game programs on my Toshiba Tecra 8000 laptop, they fill just part of the screen display, about a 7-by-5-inch rectangle. How can I set things up so that the game programs will fill the whole 14.1-inch screen? I've tried changing the pixel dimensions in the Display/Settings/Screen area but that doesn't help. As you've found, the solution doesn't always lie with going to the screen resolution settings tab after right-clicking on the desktop and picking Properties. This is because most Windows computers don't permit settings as low as required for many games - resolutions of 640 by 480 pixels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | April 2, 2001
Hewlett Packard's digital camera copies feel of trusty 35 mm Hewlett Packard has designed one of the few cameras under $1,000 in the digital realm that effectively mimic a 35-mm single lens reflex camera. The HP Photosmart 912 - with a Pentax lens and HP electronics - has the look and feel of a boxy 35 mm camera with a 34 mm to 107 mm zoom lens. The 912 uses a large barrel-twist zoom mechanism similar to a 35-mm camera rather, than the typical rocker switch. For $700, you'll get a solid 2.24-megapixel camera (1,600 by 1,280 pixels)
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | June 19, 1995
Here's looking at you, kids.The Connectix Quickcam, for Macintosh and Windows computers, is a gray-scale video camera that resembles an oversized eyeball with freckles and a tail. The camera, smaller than a baseball, comes with a built-in microphone and pyramid stand.To get an idea of what it will look like atop your computer, check out the design on the back of a dollar bill.In fact, check out the backs of 99 dollar bills, which is what many catalogs charge for this endearing little gadget.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | February 27, 2003
Today's digital cameras provide terrific resolution at reasonable prices, but if you e-mail photos to friends and family, they may offer too much of a good thing. In fact, I frequently get complaints from people who receive digital photos so large that only a fraction of the image shows up on the screen. Although it isn't hard to turn these pictures into images that can be viewed at a glance, the grandmas and grandpas who are likely to be on the receiving end often have no clue about what to do with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | October 31, 2002
If you're starved for desktop space, a liquid-crystal display is a good choice when compared to a bulky CRT monitor. But if you want one of the sleekest LCD monitors available and plan to hook up a high-definition television tuner, Sony's SDM-V72W Personal Entertainment Display ($1,000) can double as utilitarian monitor and style statement. The 17.1-inch screen orientation made this PED monitor look cool next to hulking CRTs on nearby desks. With a set of solid speakers below the screen, Sony's PED offers a number of input optionsm including component, S-Video and RGB connections.
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