Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPixar
IN THE NEWS

Pixar

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | January 27, 2006
Animation has always been a tip-of-the-iceberg art in which seconds of finished work represent weeks of thought and labor. Ever since he put Toy Story into production, John Lasseter, the reigning genius at Pixar and the new chief of Disney animation, has infused that arduous process with joy and a love for movie heritage - even as he's taken cartooning (in the words of Toy Story's Buzz Lightyear) "to infinity and beyond." For anyone who's followed Pixar closely, everything Lasseter has been saying in the wake of Pixar's sale to Disney - about the culture of Pixar being more important than its economics - rings as true as a church bell.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | June 29, 2011
"Cars 2" runs out of gas long before it runs out of running time. This sequel qualifies as the rare Pixar misfire. Unlike the wit and warmth of such animated favorites as the "Toy Story" series and "Wall-E," "Cars 2" seems cold and shrill. One reason why the earlier Pixar pictures work so well is that they aren't afraid to slow down in order to appreciate the gentler emotions common to both humans and anthropomorphized toys. Although the first "Cars" certainly had its share of automotive racing action, it also spent quality time with the automotive residents of a Southwestern town called Radiator Springs.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By CLAUDIA ELLER, KIM CHRISTENSEN AND RICHARD VERRIER | January 24, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Walt Disney Co.'s directors have tentatively agreed to buy Pixar Animation Studios, although the two sides late yesterday continued working on the final price, according to one person close to the matter. A proposal is nonetheless expected to be presented to Pixar directors this morning, with an announcement of a deal planned later in the day. Disney is expected to pay close to $7 billion - about $59 a share - for the pioneer in computer-generated animation responsible for such blockbuster films as The Incredibles, Finding Nemo and Toy Story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Five years ago, pundits were quick to cast doubt on "Cars. " A version of "Local Hero" or "Doc Hollywood" starring a high-speed auto? How misbegotten and outre! It turned out to be one of Pixar's most profitable pictures — and one of its best-loved. Creating a cast of automobiles with human features — eyeballs in the middle of their windshields, eyebrows at the top of them, and mouths and teeth under the grilles — director John Lasseter pulled off an ultra-contemporary yet homespun fable about a hot-shot racer who wins big when he slows down and smells the desert roses in the Southwestern town of Radiator Springs.
BUSINESS
By Richard Verrier and Claudia Eller and Richard Verrier and Claudia Eller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2004
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. -Steve Jobs, chief executive of Pixar Animation Studios, stunned the Walt Disney Co. and Wall Street last week by abruptly ending negotiations with the Burbank, Calif., entertainment giant to extend one of Hollywood's richest relationships, one that has produced five straight hit films. Disney executives and many independent financial analysts said Pixar was demanding too much, including sole ownership of the films the two had made under the existing pact, such as the Toy Story series and Monsters, Inc. But sources close to Eisner and Apple Computer Inc. founder Jobs said the stunning split was less about the math of the deal than about the personalties involved.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | May 24, 2009
The legend goes that when Walt Disney looked for a distributor for his Mickey Mouse cartoons, mogul Louis B. Mayer reacted with horror at the amiable rodent. How could you turn a mouse into a comic hero? Pregnant housewives would stare at the creature on the screen and miscarry right in the theater, Mayer predicted. Of course, Mickey eventually became the mascot and mainstay of Disney's own studio. So it's poetic justice that the art of upsetting conventional wisdom with original ideas has fallen to Disney's heir, John Lasseter, the creative chief of Pixar and the head of Disney animation.
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2004
EMERYVILLE, Calif. - Poor Bob Parr. Not too long into the opening of the new animated film The Incredibles, the man formerly known as the superhero Mr. Incredible has become a faceless corporate drone - consigned to the quietly humiliating life of a powerless insurance adjuster. Driven by skyrocketing malpractice claims into a witness protection program for superheroes, his once fabulous physique has gone to seed, his spirit has deflated and he's literally squished into a tiny office chair where his days are ruled by the mercurial whims of a Nazi bean counter.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Everything about Up is an up, in the most visceral and poetic ways. Pete Docter's new Pixar animated feature is even fresher, more inventive and inspired than his previous one, Monsters, Inc. Up takes its title from the defining act of a rickety widower, Carl Fredricksen (the voice of Edward Asner), who attaches thousands of helium balloons to his house and sails it to South America. He hopes to complete a promise he made to his wife, Ellie: traveling to Paradise Falls, trailblazed by their childhood hero, Charles Muntz (Christopher Plummer)
BUSINESS
By CLAUDIA ELLER AND KIM CHRISTENSEN and CLAUDIA ELLER AND KIM CHRISTENSEN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- The Walt Disney Co. formally announced yesterday an agreement to buy industry pioneer Pixar Animation Studios, sending a clear signal it intends to fix its ailing animation unit while aggressively pursuing a strategy to be at the forefront of Hollywood's digital future. The $7.4 billion all-stock deal aims to re-establish a tradition of creative and technological innovation that began with founder Walt Disney 80 years ago. It allies Disney Chief Executive Officer Robert A. Iger with Pixar Chairman Steven P. Jobs, the co-founder and head of Apple Computer Co., whose iTunes technology and other innovations changed the way people consume entertainment.
BUSINESS
By Richard Verrier, Claudia Eller and Sallie Hofmeister and Richard Verrier, Claudia Eller and Sallie Hofmeister,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2005
Bob Iger has a message for Steve Jobs: Let's talk. Yesterday, the day after he was named the next chief executive of Walt Disney Co., Iger said a top priority was to reach out to the Pixar Animation Studios chief in hopes of repairing a fractured partnership that over the years produced such blockbusters as The Incredibles, Finding Nemo and the Toy Story films. "I will certainly make an attempt and look forward to some dialogue provided he's willing," Iger, now Disney's president, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011
The cartoons have "it" — and the live-action shorts only some of "it" — in the slate of Oscar-nominated short subjects opening Friday at the Charles. The best live-action entries are Ivan Goldschmidt's "Na Wewe," a frightening, illuminating depiction of 1994 Burundi, and Luke Matheny's "God of Love," a sweet hipster comedy about a latter-day Cupid. But the live-action slate also includes the awful childhood melodrama "The Confession," as well as "The Crush," an opportunistic comedy that exploits audience qualms about a boy professing love for his teacher and then handling a gun. Happily, the animated shorts, no matter how erratic, boast a charismatic kind of inspiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
"Toy Story 3" is a prison break movie — and prison break movies have always juggled laughs and jolts. A Newsweek writer has raised the question of whether "Toy Story 3" is too frightful for small children. But children have always loved to be scared, whether by reading fairy tales or watching "The Wizard of Oz." As screenwriter Michael Arndt says, "There's nothing wrong with strong emotions — you go to a film to feel strong emotions. And the only time that doesn't work is if the emotions are cheaply earned or are made gratuitously.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
The "Toy Story" trilogy is a primal suburban growing-up story. The movie's screenwriter, Michael Arndt, whose father was in the foreign service, grew up in the suburbs of Northern Virginia. "We moved there when I was 4 or 5 years old, then went to Sri Lanka for two years; then I went to junior high and high school in McLean, right near the Potomac River. To paraphrase Sarah Palin, 'We could see Maryland from our front porch!' " Now Arndt may become the first screenwriter to go two for two at the Oscars.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | November 8, 2009
CABARET Euan Morton: Taking inspiration from Karen Carpenter (his muse) and Boy George (his most famous role), this Broadway actor brings his broad take on cabaret this week to CenterStage. It's the theater's second plate of its self-described "theatrical tapas," yet Morton's lively show should be more than filling. His four-day run starts 7 p.m. Thursday. Web: centerstage.org DVD 'Up': A rat that cooks? Talking cars and silent robots? The animators at Pixar specialize in harebrained ideas that seem doomed to fail.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Everything about Up is an up, in the most visceral and poetic ways. Pete Docter's new Pixar animated feature is even fresher, more inventive and inspired than his previous one, Monsters, Inc. Up takes its title from the defining act of a rickety widower, Carl Fredricksen (the voice of Edward Asner), who attaches thousands of helium balloons to his house and sails it to South America. He hopes to complete a promise he made to his wife, Ellie: traveling to Paradise Falls, trailblazed by their childhood hero, Charles Muntz (Christopher Plummer)
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | May 24, 2009
The legend goes that when Walt Disney looked for a distributor for his Mickey Mouse cartoons, mogul Louis B. Mayer reacted with horror at the amiable rodent. How could you turn a mouse into a comic hero? Pregnant housewives would stare at the creature on the screen and miscarry right in the theater, Mayer predicted. Of course, Mickey eventually became the mascot and mainstay of Disney's own studio. So it's poetic justice that the art of upsetting conventional wisdom with original ideas has fallen to Disney's heir, John Lasseter, the creative chief of Pixar and the head of Disney animation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Five years ago, pundits were quick to cast doubt on "Cars. " A version of "Local Hero" or "Doc Hollywood" starring a high-speed auto? How misbegotten and outre! It turned out to be one of Pixar's most profitable pictures — and one of its best-loved. Creating a cast of automobiles with human features — eyeballs in the middle of their windshields, eyebrows at the top of them, and mouths and teeth under the grilles — director John Lasseter pulled off an ultra-contemporary yet homespun fable about a hot-shot racer who wins big when he slows down and smells the desert roses in the Southwestern town of Radiator Springs.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 28, 2006
The perils of being a meanie - any kind of meanie - are brought home in the animated Ant Bully, a derivative little tale with enough good intentions to recommend it, but not enough substance to embrace it. This is an animated film that seems peculiarly stuck in time, a pint-sized morality tale aimed exclusively at young audiences. Yes, there's something reassuring about an animated feature that'll never be accused of being too smart for its own good. But as Pixar's movies have shown, most recently the marvelous Cars, it is possible for a cartoon to appeal to all ages without having to compromise anything.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 22, 2008
Even for Pixar, a company that thrives on new frontiers, WALL-E is a gutsy next move. It's the first dystopian parable that's actually ecstatic fun. It's also the closest Pixar has come to making a full-length silent movie. The choice of hero is audacious: a beeping, whirring Waste Allocation Load Lifter, Earth class, or WALL-E. For long, unbroken, startlingly seductive stretches, we see him navigate an abandoned American city all by himself. (He does have a pet cockroach.) Thanks to him, towering ziggurats made of trash compacted into cubes have sprouted up among malls and skyscrapers.
NEWS
By Jodi Liss | July 10, 2007
On its opening weekend, Pixar's Ratatouille, the story of a rat who finds his true calling in the kitchen of human beings, topped the box office list, making $47.2 million. I do not know if I will see the movie. For one thing, I have had rodents in my home and found the experience revolting, and have not yet decided whether I can stomach seeing a film about vermin, despite its obvious creativity and good reviews. Something else disturbs me even more about Ratatouille, though. I see a fair number of family movies, and it has become hard not to notice that although those extraordinary minds at Pixar, as with every other major Hollywood animation studio in recent years, can find inspiration in many forms - toys, cars, ogres, rats, bugs and countless other critters - they cannot seem to find inspiration in a female of any species.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.