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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
The Indianapolis Airport Authority has signed an agreement to be managed for the next 10 years by a private British company, BAA.The most visible evidence of change to travelers is expected to be more name-brand stores and concessions at the airport.BAA, which owns seven airports in Britain, including Heathrow outside London, and was known as the British Airports Authority until it was privatized in 1987, manages the Airmall at Pittsburgh International Airport, where there are dozens of stores and restaurants like those found in malls around the country: the Body Shop, the Nature Co. and T.G.I.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Massive girders and freshly poured concrete form a bump in the middle of the low-slung terminal, almost as if BWI Marshall Airport is expecting. In a way, it is. Before next summer, a glassed-in walkway, new shops and a modern security checkpoint will spring from the framework. Passengers will be able to get from the concourses used by Southwest and AirTran to the one used by American and Spirit without leaving security. By the time summer is out, the oldest part of BWI will be modernized and directly connected to the busiest part.
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TRAVEL
January 24, 1999
Bargains If you pay only half the usual greens fees, will all that surplus cash in your pocket affect your swing? There's only one way to find out. Go to Hilton Head, S.C., and stay at the Hyatt Regency, where you can check in through March 15 for $74 a night, their "Secret Season" rate. You'll get a card that's good for discounts of 10 to 15 percent on tennis, horseback riding, fly fishing, shopping and dining. But as a Hyatt guest you also may play on five championship courses, with greens fees starting at $40 per round, and that includes the cart.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
Now a year old, the terminal built for Southwest Airlines at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport appears to be running well -- a model of planning, and a little luck, in a turbulent industry where choosing the right airline partner makes a world of difference. The airline's passengers enjoy the terminal's vast lobby and new choices of restaurants and stores. After an initial glitch that caused some mishandling of luggage, the terminal's automated conveyor-belt system is helping security agents and baggage handlers get the airplanes off on-time and loaded with the right bags.
FEATURES
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1995
Pittsburgh -- The traveler arrived at the airport wearing two different shoes.Clark Kemp understood the harried customer's plight and promptly sold him a pair of black-tasseled loafers. Customer service takes on a whole new meaning at an "airmall."At Pittsburgh International Airport, travelers with time on their hands can shop for everything from running shoes to massage cream and pay the same for them as they would at the local mall. The airmall is the first of its kind in the country, boasting 60 stores that provide travelers with more than paperback novels, the morning newspaper and a toothbrush.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2005
In a move that is expected to reverberate locally and nationally in the already turbulent airline industry, Southwest Airlines Co. announced yesterday that beginning in May it will add Pittsburgh to the cities where it flies. The news is considered a major blow to US Airways Group Inc., the bankrupt Arlington, Va.-based carrier that was already shrinking in Pittsburgh, and is emblematic of the shift in power toward discount airlines over the more traditional, so-called "legacy" carriers.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
Now a year old, the terminal built for Southwest Airlines at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport appears to be running well -- a model of planning, and a little luck, in a turbulent industry where choosing the right airline partner makes a world of difference. The airline's passengers enjoy the terminal's vast lobby and new choices of restaurants and stores. After an initial glitch that caused some mishandling of luggage, the terminal's automated conveyor-belt system is helping security agents and baggage handlers get the airplanes off on-time and loaded with the right bags.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Massive girders and freshly poured concrete form a bump in the middle of the low-slung terminal, almost as if BWI Marshall Airport is expecting. In a way, it is. Before next summer, a glassed-in walkway, new shops and a modern security checkpoint will spring from the framework. Passengers will be able to get from the concourses used by Southwest and AirTran to the one used by American and Spirit without leaving security. By the time summer is out, the oldest part of BWI will be modernized and directly connected to the busiest part.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 10, 1994
HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, Pa. -- A high school student named Chris Ciccone saw a lone Reebok sneaker and the charred body of a child.Episcopal Bishop Alden Hathaway discovered a perfectly manicured fingernail lying in the mud.But for Beaver County Sheriff Frank Policaro, the most haunting image was this:There was hardly anything left of the fuselage of USAir Flight 427."You go up there and look for an airplane, and you won't find one," he said. "This is my first airplane crash. I hate to tell you, but they're different from auto crashes, suicides, train wrecks and tornadoes.
NEWS
December 16, 1992
WAITING IN LINE at the post office can seem like forever -- unless you're watching the troubles young Jimmy Stewart is experiencing as George Bailey in "It's A Wonderful Life." And then you realize that cooling your heels for several minutes for some stamps isn't really the worst torture you could ever endure.Workers at the post office in Harford County's Abingdon came up with the idea of setting up a TV set in the lobby and playing tapes continuously, such as the Christmas classic, "It's a Wonderful Life," or for children waiting with their parents, "Beauty and the Beast" and "101 Dalmatians."
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2005
In a move that is expected to reverberate locally and nationally in the already turbulent airline industry, Southwest Airlines Co. announced yesterday that beginning in May it will add Pittsburgh to the cities where it flies. The news is considered a major blow to US Airways Group Inc., the bankrupt Arlington, Va.-based carrier that was already shrinking in Pittsburgh, and is emblematic of the shift in power toward discount airlines over the more traditional, so-called "legacy" carriers.
TRAVEL
January 24, 1999
Bargains If you pay only half the usual greens fees, will all that surplus cash in your pocket affect your swing? There's only one way to find out. Go to Hilton Head, S.C., and stay at the Hyatt Regency, where you can check in through March 15 for $74 a night, their "Secret Season" rate. You'll get a card that's good for discounts of 10 to 15 percent on tennis, horseback riding, fly fishing, shopping and dining. But as a Hyatt guest you also may play on five championship courses, with greens fees starting at $40 per round, and that includes the cart.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
The Indianapolis Airport Authority has signed an agreement to be managed for the next 10 years by a private British company, BAA.The most visible evidence of change to travelers is expected to be more name-brand stores and concessions at the airport.BAA, which owns seven airports in Britain, including Heathrow outside London, and was known as the British Airports Authority until it was privatized in 1987, manages the Airmall at Pittsburgh International Airport, where there are dozens of stores and restaurants like those found in malls around the country: the Body Shop, the Nature Co. and T.G.I.
FEATURES
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1995
Pittsburgh -- The traveler arrived at the airport wearing two different shoes.Clark Kemp understood the harried customer's plight and promptly sold him a pair of black-tasseled loafers. Customer service takes on a whole new meaning at an "airmall."At Pittsburgh International Airport, travelers with time on their hands can shop for everything from running shoes to massage cream and pay the same for them as they would at the local mall. The airmall is the first of its kind in the country, boasting 60 stores that provide travelers with more than paperback novels, the morning newspaper and a toothbrush.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1995
As federal investigators convene a weeklong hearing in Pittsburgh today, they have little progress to report on the crash of USAir Flight 427 in September.After five months of investigating a plane crash, the National Transportation Safety Board usually comes up with something telling.That hasn't happened in the case of the Sept. 28 crash.The Boeing 737 jetliner rolled suddenly to the left and plunged 5,000 feet to the ground as it approached Pittsburgh International Airport, killing all 132 people on board.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
Whether the Ravens win or lose Sunday, fans should stay home or gather at the team's training center in Owings Mills, Baltimore-Washington International Airport officials are saying. Hoping to avoid a repeat of Sunday night, when thousands of boisterous fans showed up at the airport to greet the Ravens, officials are urging people to stay away from BWI when the team returns from Oakland early Monday morning. "The team members are not going to be accessible," Jennifer Cassidy, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Aviation Administration, said yesterday.
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