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By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
Birds perched on the jagged edges of the quarry flew up and out as the first horn sounded. After the third horn, the explosives planted in holes in a quarry wall were detonated. A loud boom was followed by a huge dust cloud that mushroomed up as 5,800 tons of limestone crashed from the wall to the floor of the pit.The county's mineral mining committee stood on the edge of the quarry, about 600 feet away from the blast. The explosion was over in a few seconds, and committee members reboarded a school bus, which took them 200 feet down steep ramps into the Genstar Stone Products Co. quarry.
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NEWS
Staff Reports, Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 22, 2014
Baltimore County Police say a 2-year-old boy received "serious injuries to the upper body" from a pit bull attack on Tuesday afternoon. Police said that at about 4:26 p.m., officers and fire personnel were called to a home in the unit block of Barnacle Court in Essex, and arrived to find the boy with the injuries. Police said the boy was in the home when the family pet, a 3-year-old brown pit bull named Midnight, attacked him. During the struggle to get the dog off of the child, family members killed the dog, police said The child was transported to Johns Hopkins Hospital for treatment of what are believed to be serious but non-life-threatening injuries.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
During his four-year career as an attackman at Hobart, Tom Gravante fueled the school's run to four consecutive NCAA Division III championships between 1985 and 1988 and was inducted into the university's Hall of Fame in 2006. On Saturday, Gravante will do his best to beat his alma mater. When the Statesmen (2-6 overall and 1-1 in the Northeast Conference) visit Emmitsburg on Saturday, they will tangle with league foe Mount St. Mary's, which is coached by Gravante. The Mountaineers suffered their ninth consecutive loss Tuesday, 15-8, to Robert Morris, setting up the first all-time meeting between Gravante and Hobart.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Just hours after the General Assembly wrapped up its 90-day session, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Tuesday that will expand pre-kindergarten education and lift the "inherently dangerous" legal stigma from the pit bulls of Maryland. O'Malley, flanked by House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, put his pen to a bill that will fund pre-K for an additional 1,600 low-income youngsters at a cost of $4.3 million. By highlighting the pre-K bill, O'Malley took advantage of an opportunity to showcase the work of Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, the governor's choice to succeed him when he leaves office in January.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Howard Libit and Ivan Penn and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writers | October 11, 1994
In a shallow pit on a wooded Elkridge lot, swarms of maggots devour dozens of carcasses of dogs, cats and deer. The powerful stench of rotten flesh hangs in the air.Flies circle above a German shepherd decomposing in a begging position. The blackened skull of what looks like a cat peaks out of a small white trash bag. The body of a deer rests face down atop about 50 other animals in the uncovered pit.The animals' bodies were dumped in the uncovered grave -- and perhaps in at least six other nearby covered pits -- in a wooded area several hundred yards from the 7700 block of Mayfield Ave., off Route 108.The grisly animal dump is also several hundred yards from a large county public works facility that includes a police-car repair shop.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1998
INDIANAPOLIS -- Ravens quarterback Jim Harbaugh will be a working stiff tomorrow, down in the pits, holding a sign board for his IndyCar driver, Scott Goodyear.Football personnel and motorsports -- it's beginning to sound like love and marriage. Joe Gibbs, Dan Marino, Walter Payton, Mark Rypien, Jerry Glanville and Joe Montana all have owned one kind of race team or another.Now it's Harbaugh's turn.He is back in Indianapolis getting ready for the 82nd Indianapolis 500 as part-owner of the car that Goodyear will start from the inside of the fourth row."
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Residents of the Fells Prospect neighborhood have long grumbled about abandoned dog feces in their sidewalk tree pits. But when a recent community association newsletter advised members to, among other things, place pine cones or clippings from thorny plants in the pits to keep dogs out, some property owners saw red and said the suggestions were both harmful to pets and illegal. John Lam, a dog owner who's lived in the neighborhood -- which is near Fells Point and Butchers Hill -- for three years, said the association's January newsletter “made a point that a tremendous amount of people aren't picking up after their pets.
EXPLORE
December 13, 2011
They're dubious landmarks with the look of a low-budget post apocalyptic movie, a fascinating history and an ironic geographic anomaly. The recently-sold Funkhouser Quarry property on the Mason-Dixon Line in the Delta-Cardiff-Whiteford area was a major source of slate from the era in U.S. history when slate was the preferred material for roofing shingles. The durability of slate is evident in buildings throughout the region whose roofs, shingled with the flat rocks a century ago, remain largely as they were even as more modern roofs have been replaced two and three times in the time since mining slate became unprofitable.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2004
"I didn't win American Idol one week and become a superstar. I actually trucked up and down the country and carried gear up and down stairs and slept in flea pits." -- Sting
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Minute amounts of Freon-type chemicals have appeared for the first time in wells along the eastern side of the Millersville landfill.Officials said the amounts found in the test wells -- 10 parts per billion -- are barely detectable and pose no threat to the landfill's neighbors.The compounds are used as refrigerants and in spray-can propellants. They were first detected in about five test wells on landfill property in November, said James Pittman, who oversees the county's 567-acre landfill.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
After two years of wrangling, the General Assembly gave its final approval Thursday to legislation that overrules a state high court ruling that pit bulls are inherently dangerous and must be held to a stricter liability standard for bites than other breeds. By an overwhelming margin, the House sent a Senate-passed bill to Gov. Martin O'Malley that eliminates the distinction between breeds created by the Court of Appeals in 2012 in the case of a child who was nearly killed by a pit bull.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
During his four-year career as an attackman at Hobart, Tom Gravante fueled the school's run to four consecutive NCAA Division III championships between 1985 and 1988 and was inducted into the university's Hall of Fame in 2006. On Saturday, Gravante will do his best to beat his alma mater. When the Statesmen (2-6 overall and 1-1 in the Northeast Conference) visit Emmitsburg on Saturday, they will tangle with league foe Mount St. Mary's, which is coached by Gravante. The Mountaineers suffered their ninth consecutive loss Tuesday, 15-8, to Robert Morris, setting up the first all-time meeting between Gravante and Hobart.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
A House committee voted to approve a bill that would upend a court ruling that pit bulls are inherently more dangerous than other dogs, indicating that a long impasse with the Senate has been broken. By a lopsided vote, the Judiciary Committee agreed to the amendments added to the bill in the Senate and sent the measure to the House floor. The bill would end the different treatment of pit bulls but make it easier for victims of bites by other breeds of dog to collect damages than under current law. The measure is a compromise between the Senate, which wanted to adopt a strict liability standard, and the House, which wanted to give dog owners more of a chance to mount a defense.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 28, 2014
The Senate on Friday unanimously approved a bill to hold dog owners liable if their pet bites someone, unless they can prove they did not know it could happen. The bill, which now goes to the House, would place a "rebuttable presumption" on pet owners that they knew or should have known their dog could bite. Owners could avoid liability if they can convince a jury their animal had never bitten anyone before or shown any other vicious tendencies. The measure seeks to deal with a 2012 ruling by the Court of Appeals finding pit bulls "inherently dangerous" and holding their owners to stricter liability than those with pets of other breeds.  The bill the Senate passed treats all breeds the same.  Its passage could end a two-year deadlock with the House of Delegates over the issue, as lawmakers differed over where to draw the line in placing responsibility for bites on pet owners and landlords.  The Senate previously had insisted on holding pet owners strictly liable for any bite, while the House had held out for something similar to what the Senate approved.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 26, 2014
If the third try's the charm, the Maryland Senate gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a bill aimed at untangling for the third time an emotional controversy over dog owners' liability if their pets bite someone. The bill would reverse a Court of Appeals opinion declaring that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous", a decision that has prompted many landlords in the state to evict the dogs - or threaten to kick out their owners - to avoid potential liability if someone is bitten on the premises.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Loyola's move to the Patriot League will put women's coach Jen Adams on the opposite side of her coach at Maryland, Cindy Timchal, one of her greatest mentors. Navy's coach for all six of its NCAA seasons, Timchal coached Adams, a three-time national player of the year and the first Tewaaraton Award winner, on four national championship Terps teams from 1998-2001. This season will be the first where they square off as head coaches. Adams already has coached against two of her other coaching mentors, Syracuse coach Gary Gait, who assisted at Maryland during her run, and Maryland coach Cathy Reese, Adams' teammate for a year and briefly a Terps' assistant.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
The state announced long-awaited rules yesterday to keep toxic substances from leaking from coal-ash dumps. The regulations require liners and runoff collection systems at all new dump sites accepting coal ash. The purpose is to prevent harmful metals and chemicals from leaching into ground water or nearby streams. Dump operators must also take steps to prevent ash from being blown onto neighboring properties. The state Department of the Environment proposed regulating coal-ash dumps after it was discovered that toxic chemicals had contaminated the wells of 23 homes near two sand-and-gravel pits in Gambrills.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
I became friends with the Solesky family after I saw first-hand the aftermath of a pit bull attack on my dog ("Singling out pit bulls is unfair," Jan. 6). As a trauma nurse, I saw that the wounds inflicted by pit bulls were kill wounds - perforated carotid, brachial, femoral arteries, scalping, broken legs - far different from those from an ordinary dog fight. Since becoming part of a advocate group for victims of pit bull attacks, I have met hundreds of people who buried their children, go through repeated reconstructive surgeries, have night terrors, bear horribly disfiguring scars and loss of function, all from pit bull attacks.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Residents of the Fells Prospect neighborhood have long grumbled about abandoned dog feces in their sidewalk tree pits. But when a recent community association newsletter advised members to, among other things, place pine cones or clippings from thorny plants in the pits to keep dogs out, some property owners saw red and said the suggestions were both harmful to pets and illegal. John Lam, a dog owner who's lived in the neighborhood -- which is near Fells Point and Butchers Hill -- for three years, said the association's January newsletter “made a point that a tremendous amount of people aren't picking up after their pets.
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